Computer Science

 

M.S., Ph.D.

401.874.2701

Faculty: Professor Peckham, chair; Associate Professor Baudet, director of graduate studies. Professors DiPippo, Fay-Wolfe and Lamagna; Associate Professors Hamel and Hervé; Adjunct Assistant Professors Dickerman, Encarnação, Henry, and Ravenscroft; Professors Emeriti Carrano and Kowalski.

SPECIALIZATIONS

Analysis of algorithms, artificial intelligence, bioinformatics, computer algebra, computer graphics, computers in education, cryptography, cyber security, databases, data mining, digital forensics, distributed computing, implementation and semantics of programming languages, logic-based programming, parallel computing, real time systems, simulation, sensor networks, vision, and visualization.

CORE AREAS

For the purpose of describing graduate degree requirements, core computer science courses are grouped into the following core areas:

Mathematical Foundations: CSC 541, 542, 544, 550

Programming Languages: CSC 402, 501, 502

Architecture and Systems: CSC 511, 512, 519

 

MASTER OF SCIENCE

Admission requirements: bachelor’s degree in computer science or a closely related field. Applicants with a bachelor’s degree in an unrelated field will be considered provided they have completed course work covering the material in CSC 211, 212, 301, 305, 340 and MTH 141, 142, plus one MTH or STA course for which calculus is a prerequisite. Students may be admitted who have completed only a part of the above course work but they will be required to complete the deficiencies before taking more advanced classes.

The GRE General test is required. A subject test in computer science or a related field is not required but may be considered by the admission committee.

Program requirements: The M.S. curriculum in computer science has three tracks: thesis, nonthesis, and applied nonthesis.

Program requirements for thesis option: 1) at least one course from each of the following core areas: mathematical foundations, programming languages, and architecture and systems; 2) at least five other courses chosen with the approval of the major professor (at least two of these must be approved CSC courses or equivalents); 3) eight credits of thesis.

Program requirements for nonthesis option: 1) at least two courses from mathematical foundations, one course from programming languages, and two courses from architecture and systems; 2) at least three more approved CSC courses or equivalents; 3) at least two more courses chosen with the approval of the advisor; 4) at least one of the ten courses listed above should include writing a substantial paper based on significant independent research; 5) passing a written comprehensive examination.

Program requirements for applied nonthesis option: 1) at least two courses from mathematical foundations, one course from programming languages, and two courses from architecture and systems; 2) at least two more approved CSC courses or equivalents; 3) at least one course should include writing a substantial paper based on significant independent research; 4) an approved concentration in another discipline consisting of a minimum of four graduate courses in the area of concentration; 5) passing a written comprehensive examination.

Approved applied nonthesis option concentrations exist for Computers and Business Management, Computers and Operations Research, and Computers and Statistics. Other concentrations are possible. Students should meet with their faculty advisors to discuss requirements. The department encourages other application areas in the physical, biological, mathematical, and social sciences. Students in the applied track will have an advisor in computer science and an advisor in their application area. Together, these advisors will approve the student’s program of study.

 

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY

Admission requirements: Bachelors degree in computer science or a closely related field. Applicants with a bachelors degree in an unrelated field will be considered provided they have completed course work covering the material in CSC 211, 212, 301, 305, 340 and MTH 141, 142, plus one MTH or STA course for which calculus is a prerequisite. Students may be admitted who have completed only a part of the above course work but they will be required to complete the deficiencies before taking more advanced classes.

The GRE general test is required. A subject test in computer science or a related field is not required, but may be considered by the admission committee.

Program requirements: The student must complete 54 credits of course work beyond the bachelors degree in addition to 18 credits for the doctoral dissertation. A student entering the program with an M.S. degree in computer science or a related area may be granted up to 30 credits toward the Ph.D. in computer science.

Students must complete two courses from mathematical foundations, one course from programming languages, two courses from architecture and systems, plus three more approved CSC courses or equivalents. Other courses must be selected in order to meet the 54-credit minimum and will be selected in consultation with the student’s advisor or major professor.

Students must take a comprehensive examination, which is composed of a written examination and an oral examination. The written examination, which will be held at least once a year, covers the three core areas listed above. Success in the written examination is conditional upon obtaining passing grades in all areas, and is a prerequisite for taking the oral examination. Typically, a student would be expected to take the comprehensive examination within two years after joining the program. The objective of the oral examination is for the student to present an intended research program and demonstrate satisfactory knowledge and understanding of the scientific literature of the corresponding research domain. A candidate whose comprehensive exam performance is deemed as failing by the Computer Science Graduate Committee may, with the recommendation of the committee and the approval of the Graduate School, be permitted one re-examination, to be taken no sooner than four months and no later than one year after the initial examination.

 

DIGITAL FORENSICS GRADUATE CERTIFICATE PROGRAM

The Graduate Certificate in Digital Forensics is designed for professionals who have a four-year undergraduate degree and wish to pursue a focused program in the field of digital forensics. A student wishing to receive a Graduate Certificate in Digital Forensics must complete the following courses:  CSF 410, 512, 516, and one of CSF 414, 524. For more information, including a list of required courses and an application to the program, please visit dfcsc.uri.edu/academics/digital_forensics.

 

CYBER SECURITY GRADUATE CERTIFICATE PROGRAM

The Graduate Certificate in Cyber Security is designed for professionals who have a four-year undergraduate degree and wish to pursue a focused program in the field of cyber security. A student wishing to receive a Graduate Certificate in Cyber Security must complete the following courses:  CSF 430, 432, 534, and one of CSF 524, 538, 536. For more information, including a list of required courses and an application to the program, please visit dfcsc.uri.edu/academics/cyber_security.

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