Environmental and Natural Resource Economics

M.S., Ph.D.

401.874.2471

Faculty: Professor J.J. Opaluch, chair; Associate Professor H. Uchida, Director of Graduate Studies. Professor J Burkett; Associate Professors: H. Uchida, E. Uchida; Assistant Professors: T. Guilfoos, C. Lang, T. Sproul, S. Trandafir; Professor Emeriti: J. Sutinen, T. Tyrrell.

Specializations

Economics and policy in environment, renewable/nonrenewable natural resources, agriculture, and international development; behavioral economics, experimental economics, economics of risk and uncertainty, nonmarket valuation, energy economics, and agent-based modeling. More specific specializations include, but not limited to: fisheries and aquaculture management and marketing;  land use change and management of coastal zone and terrestrial areas; green economy including tourism; climate change; management and valuation of ecosystem services; renewable energy policy; water resource management; and  natural resource pricing policies.

Master of Science

Admission requirements: the GRE is required. A strong undergraduate record in economics, statistics, and mathematics is advantageous but not required.

Program requirements: for the thesis option, 24 credits including EEC 501, 502, 528, 534, 535, and 576, in addition to a written comprehensive examination, and at least six EEC 599 M.S. thesis credits. For the nonthesis option, 33 credits including 501, 502, 528, 534, 535, and 576, in addition to a written comprehensive examination, and one EEC 598 credit given for a major paper requiring significant independent research. EEC 501 must be taken each semester by full-time graduate students in residence, but only one credit may count toward the program.

Doctor of Philosophy

Admission requirements: GRE,is required. Master’s degree in environmental and natural resource economics or related fields is preferred but not required. Strong background in mathematics (calculus and linear algebra) and statistics are essential.

Program requirements: the Ph.D. qualifying exam is required of students admitted without the master’s degree in related fields. EEC 501, 502, 528, 534, 535, 576, 602, 624, 628, 630, 634, 676, and 699 are required. EEC 501 must be taken each semester by full-time graduate students in residence, but only one credit may count toward the program. Students with a master’s degree in a closely related field may transfer up to 30 credits toward their Ph.D. Additional courses may be elected from appropriate offerings, such as economics, engineering, geography, oceanography, mathematics, natural resources science, political science, statistics, computer science, finance, marine affairs, and management science. The Ph.D. dissertation will be written on a problem involving one of the areas of specialization above.