Environmental Science and Management

(Interdepartmental)

M.E.S.M.

401.874.4880

Steering committee: Professors P.V. August, and A.J. Gold, co-chairs; Professors Bengtson, Paton, Boving, Gordon and Y.Q. Wang.

Faculty: Professors Alm, Amador, Atash, August, Bengtson, Boving, Burroughs, Dalton, Fastovsky, Forrester, Ginsberg, A. Gold, Gomez-Chiarri, Green, Husband, LeBrun, T. Mather, B. Maynard, McWilliams, Opaluch, Paton, Pollnac, Rhodes, Rice, Sheridan, Simeoni, Stolt, Swift, and Y.Q. Wang; Associate Professors Gordon, Meyerson, E. Uchida, H. Uchida, and Veeger; Assistant Professors Becker, R. Brown, Cardace, Karraker, Macinko,  Mitkowski, Petersson, Sartini, and Savage; Adjunct Associate Professor Abedon.

The Master of Environmental Science and Management (M.E.S.M.) is an interdisciplinary, interdepartmental, professional degree program designed for students who seek professional environmental positions in areas other than research.  The M.E.S.M. degree program serves graduate students from six departments within URI’s College of Environment and Life Sciences (CELS): Environmental and Natural Resource Economics; Fisheries, Animal and Veterinary Science; Geosciences; Marine Affairs; Natural Resources Science; and Plant Sciences. It is administered by a steering committee selected from the graduate faculty.

Specializations

Conservation biology; earth and hydrologic science; environmental policy and management; remote sensing and spatial analysis; sustainable systems; and wetland, watershed, and ecosystem science.

Master of Environmental Science and Management

Admission requirements: GRE and bachelor’s degree in biological science, physical science, environmental science, natural resources, or engineering. Applicants with course deficiencies may be required to take appropriate undergraduate courses for no program credit and to demonstrate, by their performance in such coursework or through a qualifying exam, basic knowledge of the subject matter in the area(s) of deficiency. Application must be made to one of the six specializations.

Program requirements: A minimum of 36 credits of course work consisting of 21-25 credits of core courses, including at least 9 credits in natural sciences, at least 6 credits in social sciences, and at least 3 credits in numerical methods; 6-10 credits of electives, up to 3 credits of which might be an internship (EVS 597) with an environmental agency, nongovernmental agency, or private firm; an independent research project (EVS 598) that culminates in a substantial, high-quality, written report; and at least 2 credits of graduate seminar (typically EVS 501, 502), including a terminal oral presentation. Written comprehensive examination on coursework. Course requirements that are unique to each of the specializations are as follows. Conservation biology: 12-16 credits in natural sciences, including at least 3 credits in plant and animal biology, at least 3 credits in ecology, and at least 3 credits in biodiversity analysis and management; and at least 2 credits of graduate seminar from EEC, EVS, NRS, or PLS. Earth and hydrologic science: 12-16 credits in natural sciences from any or all of the following categories: earth surface processes, hydrology, solid earth materials and processes, or spatial analysis and remote sensing; and at least 2 credits of graduate seminar from EVS, GEO, MAF, or NRS. Environmental planning and design: 13 credits in planning and design including at least 4 credits in design studio and at least 9 credits in planning; 9 credits in natural sciences from any or all of the following categories or from numerical methods: geology, hydrology, and soil science; ecology and management; or remote sensing and spatial analysis. Environmental policy and management: 9 credits in social sciences from policy, planning, economics, and research methods; 9 credits in natural sciences from any or all of the following categories or from numerical methods: geology, hydrology, and soil science; ecology and management; or remote sensing and spatial analysis; and at least 2 credits of graduate seminar from CPL, EEC, EVS, GEO, MAF, or NRS. Remote sensing and spatial analysis: 12-16 credits in natural sciences, including at least 9 credits in remote sensing and spatial analysis, and 0-7 credits in earth and ecosystem science; and at least 2 credits of graduate seminar from EVS, GEO, or NRS. Sustainable systems: 12-16 credits in natural sciences, including at least 3 credits in natural ecosystems and at least 3 credits in managed ecosystems; and at least 2 credits of graduate seminar from AFS, EEC, EVS, NRS, or PLS. Wetland, watershed, and ecosystem science: 12-16 credits in natural sciences, including at least 3 credits in each of the following topics watersheds, wetlands, and ecosystems plus 3 credits in earth science, soils, or spatial analysis; and at least 2 credits of graduate seminar from EEC, EVS, GEO, MAF, or NRS.

 Graduate Certificate in GIS and Remote Sensing

The URI Graduate Certificate in Geographic Information Systems and Remote Sensing (GIS/RS) provides students advanced training in using geospatial technologies to address analytical problems where location is an essential parameter.

Admission requirements: To apply you will need to provide: (1) college transcripts certifying successful completion of a bachelor’s degree, (2) two letters of recommendation from peers, mentors, or colleagues attesting to your ability to complete graduate-level coursework, and (3) a personal written statement explaining why you are seeking a graduate certificate in GIS/RS.  GRE’s are not required.  Applications for Fall semester admission should be completed by 10 August and applications for Spring semester admission should be completed by 1 December.

Program requirements: 15 credits of graduate coursework that consists of: NRS410, NRS509, NRS522, and NRS51 or NRS415. The remaining credits are taken from an approved list of additional courses.

For more information: see http://web.uri.edu/cels-gradprograms/certificate-in-gis-and-remote-sensing/