Graduate Degree Program Descriptions

This section describes the admission and degree requirements for the University’s graduate programs, which are included within the general requirements set forth previously, and do not reduce those requirements.

The specific program requirements that follow are also minimum requirements; additional course credits may be required for students whose academic background is considered insufficient.

For example, in nonthesis master’s degree programs, all students must take at least one course requiring a substantial paper involving significant independent study, and all Ph.D. students who do not hold an earned master’s degree in a closely related field are required to take the Ph.D. qualifying examination even if it is not listed in the individual program requirements.

The standardized test scores admission requirement is also specific to each particular program. For programs requiring a standardized test, applications will not be reviewed until scores have been received. In all other cases, scores may be submitted if applicants believe the test results will enhance their application. However, the test results should be submitted as early as possible. If an application is received before test results, the admission decision may be made without the scores.

Successful completion of any course of study at URI does not guarantee that the student will find either a specific kind or level of employment. Graduate students interested in the career opportunities related to their program of study are encouraged to discuss their interests with the appropriate department chair or director of graduate studies, the Graduate School’s dean, or Career Services staff. Students uncertain about career choices are also invited to use the services offered by the Counseling Center.

The availability of these programs of study and areas of specialization, administrative locations, requirements, and titles, are subject to change without notice.

For information on the background of your program’s faculty, turn to the directory at the end of this catalog or visit the website of the relevant department(s) at uri.edu.

Accounting

M.S.

401.874.5000

Faculty: Professor Schwarzbach, director of graduate studies. Professors Beckman, Martin, and Matoney; Associate Professors Boyle and Hazera; Assistant Professors Graham, Jervins, and Blanthorne.

Master of Science

The Master of Science in accounting program is appropriate for students with a variety of educational backgrounds and professional interests. The program’s objective is to provide an accounting and business foundation for the student with an undergraduate degree in an area other than accounting. These students graduate with a strong theoretical understanding of accounting along with the necessary technical background. They are equipped to perform exceedingly well in entry-level positions in accounting. An objective for students with undergraduate degrees in accounting is to provide a fifth year of conceptual, theoretical, and technical education in accounting, finance, management science, and other areas where the student and program director feel the student can gain the most toward achieving his or her educational objectives.

An applicant with a bachelor’s degree in accounting from an accredited institution can complete the program of study in one year. Applicants with no prior education in business will need to spend two years in full-time study or longer if studying part-time. The course of study is divided into two parts. Part one is a common body of knowledge in business and accounting that is required for all students without a bachelor’s degree in business. The student’s undergraduate record is evaluated, and common body of knowledge courses are waived when a student has undergraduate equivalents. The second phase of the program allows the students to build on their accounting foundation and develop a high level of theoretical knowledge and a sound understanding of accounting principles and techniques. During the second part of the program, the student selects an area of specialization. Two areas are available: 1) financial reporting and auditing, or 2) taxation.

Admission requirements: An undergraduate grade point average of approximately B or above and a score at the 50th percentile or above on the GMAT examination are expected. The GMAT score and the undergraduate grade point average are not the sole criteria for admission. However, those with undergraduate grade point averages of less than B or with lower than 50th percentile scores on the GMAT have a reduced probability of admission. The GRE may be used in lieu of the GMAT at the discretion of the director of graduate studies. Applicants for whom English is not the native language will be expected to demonstrate proficiency in written and oral communications (TOEFL score of 91 or above), or they may be required to correct deficiencies by taking selected courses for no program credit. The University minimum must be met on each of the four sections of the TOEFL; see uri.edu/gsadmis/gs_apply_int.

Program requirements: From 30 to 63 credits, depending on undergraduate program. A course requiring a major paper involving independent study is required in the nonthesis option. All graduate-level courses offered by the College of Business Administration are open to matriculated graduate students only.

Applied Mathematical Sciences

See applied mathematics track under Mathematics. For a description of the former Ph.D. program in Applied Mathematical Sciences, which is no longer open to incoming students, please refer to the 2010-2011 URI Catalog.

Biological and Environmental Sciences

M.S., Ph.D. (Interdepartmental)

401.874.2957

The M.S. and Ph.D. in biological and environmental sciences (BES) are interdisciplinary, interdepartmental graduate degrees that involve faculty from a diverse set of departments in URI’s College of the Environment and Life Sciences (CELS), including Biological Sciences; Cell and Molecular Biology; Fisheries, Animal and Veterinary Science; Geosciences; Natural Resources Science; Nutrition and Food Sciences; and Plant Sciences; as well as faculty from the Graduate School of Oceanography. Contact information and a list of faculty in each of these departments are provided below.

Students accepted into the M.S. and Ph.D. degree programs in BES are organized into graduate specialization groups that include Cell and Molecular Biology (CMB), Integrative and Evolutionary Biology (IEB), Ecology and Ecosystem Sciences (EES), Environmental and Earth Sciences (EVES), and Sustainable Agriculture and Food Systems (SAFS). These graduate specialization groups are described in more detail below, along with the admissions and degree requirements for M.S. and Ph.D. students in BES. When applying to the BES graduate program, prospective students should indicate which of the graduate specialization groups listed below represents their primary area of interest. Prospective students are encouraged to contact individual faculty to learn more about graduate research opportunities.

Departments in CELS that train graduate students in Biological and Environmental Sciences:

Biological Sciences 401.874.2373, uri.edu/cels/bio

Faculty: Professor Goldsmith, chair; Associate Professor Wilga, director of graduate studies. Professors Bullock, Fastovsky, Kass-Simon, Killingbeck, Koske, A. Roberts, and Webb; Associate Professors Irvine, Katz, Norris, Siebel, and Thornber; Assistant Professors Lane, Preisser, and Sartini; Adjunct Professors Carlton, Deacutis, Fogarty, Henry, Lauder, Sanford, and Schneider; Adjunct Associate Professors Bailey, Cromarty, Ewanchuk, Gemma, Orwig, T. Roberts, and Thursby; Adjunct Assistant Professor Raposa; Research Professor Hill.

Cell and Molecular Biology 401.874.2201, cels.uri.edu/cmb

Faculty: Professor Sperry, chair; Professor Nelson, director of graduate studies. Professors Chandlee, Cohen, Hufnagel, Kausch, Paquette, and Sun; Associate Professor Martin; Assistant Professors Howlett and Jenkins; Research Professors A. de Groot, L. de Groot, and Spero; Research Assistant Professor Moise; Professors Emeriti Laux and Mottinger.

Fisheries, Animal and Veterinary Science 401.874.2477, uri.edu/cels/favs

Faculty: Professor Bengtson, chair; Professor Gomez-Chiarri, director of graduate studies. Professors Bradley, Costa-Pierce, DeAlteris, Mallilo, Rhodes, and Rice; Assistant Professors Peterson and Sartini; Adjunct Professors Hoey, Klein-MacPhee, Musick, Serra, and Smolowitz; Adjunct Associate Professors Colwill and Hare; Adjunct Assistant Professors Brumbaugh, Castro, Dudzinski, Gleason, Hancock, Leavitt, Rheault, Petersson, Schwartz, and Wetherbee; Professors Emeriti Chang and Recksiek.

Geosciences 401.874.2265, uri.edu/cels/geo

Faculty: Associate Professor Veeger, chair; Professor Boving, director of graduate studies. Professor Fastovsky; Assistant Professors Cardace and Savage; Adjunct Professors Burks, Fischer, and Spiegelman.

Natural Resources Science 401.874.2495, nrs.uri.edu

Faculty: Professor Paton, chair; Professor Forrester, director of graduate studies. Professors Amador, August, Gold, Husband, McWilliams, Paton, Stolt, and Wang; Assistant Professors F. Meyerson and L. Meyerson; Adjunct Professors Paul and Perez; Adjunct Associate Professors Abedon, Cerrato, Daehler, Gorres, Groffman, Nowicki, O’Connell, Reed, and Rockwell; Adjunct Assistant Professors Augeri, Bergondo, Buffum, Dabek, Eisenbies, Eldridge, Farnsworth, Gayaldo, Hollister, Jarecki, Kellogg, Lashcomb, McKinney, Milstead, Mitchell, Peters, Pierce, Rubenstein, Saltonstall, Steele, and Tefft.

Nutrition and Food Sciences 401.874.2253, cels.uri.edu/nfs

Faculty: Professor Greene, chair; Assistant Professor Lofgren, director of graduate studies. Professor English; Associate Professors Gerber and Melanson; Assistant Professor Tovar; Adjunct Professor Sebelia; Adjunct Associate Professor Pivarnik; Professors Emeriti Rand, Lee, Caldwell, Fey-Yensan and Patnoad.

Plant Sciences and Entomology 401.874.2791, cels.uri.edu/pls

Faculty: Professor Maynard, chair; Professor Mather, director of graduate studies. Professors Alm, Casagrande, LeBrun, Ruemmele, and Sullivan; Associate Professors Englander and Mitkowski; Assistant Professor Brown; Professor in Residence Ginsberg; Adjunct Assistant Professor Gettman; Professors Emeriti Beckman, Hull, and Jackson.

Graduate Specialization Groups

Cell and Molecular Biology (CMB): This graduate research group focuses on the molecular basis of life, offering solid foundations in biochemistry, microbiology, and molecular genetics, with an emphasis on interdisciplinary training. Faculty research interests are diverse and include the molecular basis of microbial colonization and virulence; the biochemistry of cellular signaling; the molecular origins of cancer; the development of vaccines against infectious disease; the roles of microbial consortia in the marine environment; comparative and evolutionary genomics; the control of gene expression by endogenous and environmental signals; the genetics of marine organisms; the molecular biology and genetic modification of plants; agricultural biotechnology; and developmental gene regulation.

Integrative and Evolutionary Biology (IEB): This graduate group focuses on the diversity of form and function of organisms from evolutionary and physiological perspectives, as well as the application of these approaches to health, agriculture, and the environment. Faculty research interests are diverse and include animal science (including reproduction, nutrition, management, and health), aquaculture (including ecology, physiology, nutrition, and health), cellular and behavioral neurobiology (including sensory biology and neuroethology), evolutionary biology, genomics (comparative, evolutionary, and marine), morphology and development (including functional morphology, biomechanics, and evolutionary developmental biology), paleontology, physiology and pathology (including environmental, stress, reproductive, and comparative physiology, endocrinology, aquatic pathology), plant biology, and human health.

Ecology and Ecosystem Sciences (EES): This graduate research group focuses on patterns and processes within and among populations, communities, and ecosystems. Faculty research interests are diverse and include ecological studies across the spectrum of biological organization (molecular, organismal, population, community, ecosystem, and landscapes) that focus on the intra- and interspecific interactions of microbes, algae, plants, insects, invertebrates, and vertebrates that inhabit a variety of terrestrial, coastal, freshwater, and marine ecosystems. Much of this research addresses important environmental issues with implications for public policy such as the ecology of endangered species and habitats, the biological control of algal blooms, invertebrate pests, parasites and disease, anthropogenic nutrient enrichment and bioremediation, ecohydrology of coastal wetlands, landscape change, climate change, invasive species, fisheries, and habitat restoration.

Environmental and Earth Sciences (EVES): This graduate research group focuses on the history, function, and condition of earth’s environments from local to global scales. Faculty research interests encompass all aspects of the natural sciences including geology, biogeochemistry, hydrology, soil science, assessment of biodiversity, microbial ecology, and global change. Most of this research uses combinations of geospatial data technologies, computer modeling, state-of-the-art analytical instruments, and field investigations to advance our knowledge of earth processes and the management of water resources, shorelines, wetlands, and terrestrial landscapes to sustain healthy environments and to rehabilitate and restore damaged environments.

Sustainable Agriculture and Food Systems (SAFS): This graduate research group takes a systems-based, interdisciplinary approach to the biological and environmental sciences as applied to agriculture, aquaculture, fisheries, nutrition, and food safety. The diverse group of faculty, with contributors from both the natural and social sciences, uses a broad array of approaches, from molecular to ecosystem-based, to help achieve the economically sustainable production, management, consumption, and utilization of plants and animals for the development of healthy communities. Areas of research include animal science (reproduction, nutrition, management, and health), aquaculture (ecology, physiology, nutrition, and aquatic pathology), horticulture (fruit and vegetable production, environmental horticulture, and turfgrass management), entomology and biocontrol of invasive species, nutrition and food safety, and soil science.

Master of Science in Biological and Environmental Sciences

Admission requirements: GRE general test and a bachelor’s degree in a biological or physical science, natural resources science, math, engineering, or other appropriate discipline. Applicants with course deficiencies may be required to take additional undergraduate courses for no program credit, and to demonstrate, by their performance in such course work or through a qualifying exam, basic knowledge of the subject matter in the area(s) of deficiency.

Program requirements: a minimum of 30 credits beyond the bachelor’s degree. This includes a minimum of six and a maximum of nine thesis credits (599 courses), a minimum of 18 credits of formal course work, and a maximum of six credits in special problems and directed studies courses.

Doctor of Philosophy in Biological and Environmental Sciences

Admission requirements: GRE general test and a bachelor’s degree in a biological or physical science, natural resources science, math, engineering, or other appropriate discipline. Applicants with course deficiencies may be required to take additional undergraduate courses for no program credit.

Program requirements: a minimum of 72 credits of graduate study beyond the bachelor’s degree (a master’s degree may count for up to 30 credits). At least 42 credits must be taken at the University of Rhode Island. Required course work and dissertation credits depend on the preparation and study plan of the individual student. All degree candidates are required to prepare a Program of Study in consultation with their major professor and doctoral committee. Written and oral comprehensive examinations and a defense of dissertation are required. A qualifying examination will be required for students who are admitted without a master’s degree and may be required for students whose prior degrees are outside of the proposed Ph.D. field of study.

Business Administration

M.B.A., Ph.D.

401.874.5000

Faculty: Professor Higgins, dean; Professors S. Chen and Rosen, associate deans.

Accounting: Professors Beckman, Higgins, Martin, Matoney, and Schwarzbach; Associate Professors Blanthorne, Boyle, Graham, Hazera, and Jervis; Assistant Professor Jelinek.

Business Law: Professor Hickox; Associate Professor Dunn.

Decision Science: Professors Budnick, S. Chen, and Jarrett.

Entrepreneurial Management: Professors Beauvais, Comerford, Cooper, and Scholl; Associate Professors Dorado-Banacloche, Creed, Dugal, and Wheeler.

Finance: Professor Dash; Associate Professors Lee, Lin, and Oppenheimer; Assistant Professors DaDalt, Xu, and Yu.

Information Systems: Professor Westin; Associate Professors Lloyd and Shin.

Marketing: Professors Della Bitta, N. Dholakia, R. Dholakia, Mazze, and Rosen; Associate Professors Leonard and Sheinin; Assistant Professor Cai.

Supply Chain Management: Professor Mangiameli; Associate Professor Hales; Assistant Professors Y. Chen and Ozpolat.

Specializations

For the M.B.A.: finance, general business, management, marketing, and supply chain management.

For the Ph.D.: finance and insurance, management, operations and supply chain management, and marketing.

General Information

In addition to the University’s Office of Information Services, business students have access to three other computer facilities: the Bruce S. Sherman trading room, the college’s general computer facility, and a computer laboratory at the Alan Shawn Feinstein College of Continuing Education (in Providence).

Master of Business Administration

The Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.) program prepares students for leadership positions in business, government, and nonprofit organizations. The faculty seeks to develop a global perspective while stressing the ethical and environmental responsibilities inherent in all management activities. Full-time candidates may begin the program in the fall semester only and will complete the program in one calendar year. Part-time candidates may begin the program in the fall, spring, or summer semester.

Admission requirements: Graduate Management Admissions Test (GMAT) or Graduate Record Exam (GRE), a statement of purpose, application fee, a résumé, two letters of recommendation, and transcripts of all previous undergraduate or postbaccalaureate work are required. Work experience is valued. Applicants for whom English is not the native language are required to score 91 or above on the TOEFL (or 6.5 on the IELTS) and to meet the University minimum on each of the four sections of the TOEFL exam; see uri.edu/gsadmis/gs_apply_int.  The GMAT or GRE score and undergraduate grade point average are not the sole criteria for admission. However, those with undergraduate grade point averages of less than B or those with less than 50th percentile scores on the GMAT or GRE have a low probability of admission. Applications from well-qualified individuals who can contribute to the cultural and ethnic diversity of the College of Business Administration and the University are welcome. Part-time M.B.A. applications are due June 30 for September admission, October 31 for January admission, and March 31 for summer admission. Full-time M.B.A. applications are due April 15 for September admission.

Program requirements: The M.B.A. program curriculum has been updated to maintain a program that is current and relevant in the workplace.

The part-time M.B.A. program requires a minimum of 36 credits and a maximum of 45 credits. First, students are required to take the following seven courses: ECN 590, MBA 500, 502, 503, 504, 505, 565. Waiver exams are available for MBA 500, 504, and 505. MBA 500, MBA 503, and ECN 590 can be waived with permission of the program director based on successful completion of recent equivalent college-level courses at an AACSB-accredited institution. Students then must select five out of the following seven courses: MBA 510, 530, 540, 550, 555, 560, and 562. Finally, students are required to take three electives to complete their program of study.

The one-year full-time M.B.A. program is a nonthesis program consisting of a 45-credit integrated curriculum. Students take day classes during the fall and spring semesters. During the summer, they complete their program by participating in an internship or elective course work. Completed application packages must be received by April 15 for U.S. residents and February 15 for international applicants; applications received after that date are reviewed on a space-available basis.

Doctor of Philosophy

The Ph.D. program in Business Administration is a research-based program. In addition to advanced course work, students work closely with faculty to conduct research on business issues of national and global importance. The program prepares students for faculty positions at research colleges and universities. The Ph.D. program is highly selective-only a small number of students are accepted each year. To be admitted you must demonstrate both academic merit and research capabilities.

Admission requirements: GMAT or GRE, a master’s degree, original online application, a statement of purpose, a resume, three letters of recommendation, and transcripts of all previous degrees are required. Applicants with diverse academic backgrounds and previous industry experience are encouraged to apply.

Applicants are admitted for the fall semester only. Due to the selectivity of the programs, new admissions to the doctoral program must be limited to a small number each year. Since applicants are evaluated by the doctoral faculty in each of the specialization areas independently, all applicants must specify a single area of specialization on the application form. Completed application packages must be received by February 1.

Applicants for whom English is not the native language will be expected to score 575 (paper-based), 233 (computer-based), or 91 (iBT) or above on the TOEFL and to meet the University minimum on each of the four sections of the exam; see uri.edu/gsadmis/gs_apply_int.  Students may substitute the IELTS (minimum score of 6.5) for the TOEFL. The GMAT or GRE scores and master’s grade point average are not the sole criteria for admission. However, those with master’s grade point averages of less than 3.20 on a 4.00 point scale or those who score lower than 600 on the GMAT or GRE have a low probability of admission. The average master’s grade point average for current doctoral candidates is 3.60, and their standardized scores average is 640.

Program requirements: Students must have a broad understanding of the major disciplines that comprise the study of business administration and their application to organizational settings. If you do not have this prerequisite knowledge, you may be required to complete up to 12 credits of prerequisite course work in the following areas: behavioral science applications to business administration (management or marketing), financial economics (economics or finance), statistics, and accounting. These prerequisite courses are not included for program credit. Students with previous course work in these areas are normally exempted. There are other avenues for an exemption. Students should discuss these alternatives with the doctoral program director.

The advanced course work phase entails a minimum of 32 credit hours of advanced course work beyond the master’s degree. It consists of 12 credits of doctoral research seminars in your area of specialization, six credits of research methods, and 12 credits of supporting electives. There are also two one-credit courses on teaching and research. As part of this phase, you will write two major papers of publishable quality. These papers are under the guidance of your professors. This phase culminates in written and oral comprehensive examinations covering your area of specialization, research methods, and other areas deemed appropriate by your doctoral dissertation committee.

After passing the comprehensive examination, doctoral candidates enter the dissertation research phase and engage in significant research under the supervision of their major professor and the doctoral committee. Doctoral dissertation research is expected to make a major contribution to the state of knowledge in the candidate’s field. The dissertation defense is a final oral examination administered according to procedures established by the Graduate School.

Chemical Engineering

M.S., Ph.D.

401.874.2655

Faculty: Professor Brown, chair; Professor Greenfield, director of graduate studies. Professors Bose, Brown, Gregory, and Lucia; Associate Professors Bothun, Greenfield, and Rivero-Hudec; Associate Research Professor Crisman; Adjunct Associate Professors Park and Mehos, Professors Emeriti Barnett, Gray, Knickle, Rockett, and Rose.

Specializations

Biochemical engineering: reactors, purification methods, degradation, and chemical production.

Bionanotechnology: hybrid bio/nano materials, drug delivery, biomolecular processes, sensors and devices.

Energy engineering: analysis of energy systems, multiphase flow and water conservation.

Environmental engineering: separation methods, heavy metal removal, solvent recovery, hazardous waste minimization, and desalination.

Materials engineering: corrosion and erosion, electronic materials processing, ceramic processing, polymer films, conducting polymers and thin film materials and sensors.

Polymer process engineering: thermophysical properties of polymers, polymer process modeling and control, and molecular modeling.

Process simulation: process design, optimization, and analysis; process control; numerical methods.

Surface, interfacial and colloidal phenomena: soft and hard colloids, nano composites, and imaging techniques.

Unit operations: mixing, vacuum processes, chromatography, electrodialysis, ultrafiltration and microfiltration.

Master of Science

Admission requirements: bachelor’s degree in chemical engineering; candidates from other engineering fields or from mathematics, biology, chemistry, or physics may be accepted into the program with possible addition of prerequisite courses.

Program requirements: 30 credits including CHE 501, 502, 513, 541, 599 (6-12 credits). For 12 thesis credits, no special problems or graduate seminar credit is permitted, 18-24 credits of course work. Nonthesis option for part-time students, with permission of the chair; master’s examination and comprehensive report with oral examination. Attendance in CHE 501 or 502 is required every semester for all on-campus students.

Doctor of Philosophy

Admission requirements: B.S. or M.S. degree in engineering.

Program requirements: Candidate’s program will be determined in consultation with his or her committee and will be based on his or her background and career goals, but must include CHE 501, 502, 614, 641, 699 (24 credits). Twelve credits of course work in addition to the required courses would be needed. A comprehensive examination and an acceptable dissertation are required to complete the program, along with CHE 501, 502.

Polymer Certificate Program

The postbaccalaureate certificate program in polymers is targeted toward students who possess a bachelor’s degree in an engineering or science field and are seeking further education in polymers. The program provides opportunities for students to improve their knowledge of polymers in areas outside of their specific field of expertise, to apply their technical knowledge to problems in polymer engineering and science, and to develop technical skills that can be applied in industrial polymer engineering positions.

Admission requirements: same as for M.S.

Program requirements: successful completion of four courses: CHE 513, 530, 531, and 537.

Chemistry

M.S., Ph.D.

401.874.2318

Faculty: Professor Euler, chair. Professors Dain, Freeman, Kirschenbaum, Lucht, Oxley, Rosen, Smith, and Yang; Associate Professor DeBoef; Assistant Professors Dwyer, Levine, and Narayanan; Professors Emeriti C. Brown, P. Brown, Cheer, Cruickshank, Fasching, Goodman, Nelson, Traficante, and Vittimberga.

Specializations

Analytical chemistry: vibrational spectroscopy, separations science, laser spectroscopy, bioanalyses, surface science, explosives.

Biological chemistry: enzyme inhibition, neurochemistry, oxidative stress, macromolecular recognition.

Inorganic chemistry: metals in high oxidation states, solution kinetics, coordination complexes, electron transport, polymers.

Organic chemistry: reaction mechanisms, synthesis, electron transfer, heterocycles, polymers, organometallics.

Physical chemistry: theoretical chemistry, molecular spectroscopy, polymer arrays, statistical mechanics, smart materials.

Master of Science

Admission requirements: Preference is given to candidates with undergraduate majors in chemistry or chemical engineering including mathematics through calculus. GRE only for graduates of non-U.S. universities, with advanced test strongly recommended.

Program requirements: placement examination to determine specific program requirements and successful completion of master’s qualifying examinations. For thesis option (31 credits), 12 credits of graduate core courses in at least three of the four areas of chemistry; one additional graduate-level course in chemistry; CHM 642 or 643; and thesis. For nonthesis option (30 credits), 18 credits of graduate core courses; six additional credits of graduate course work; CHM 642 (1 credit); CHM 551, 552 (minimum 5 credits); and a written comprehensive examination.

The 30-credit nonthesis option is also offered on-site at Pfizer, Inc. (Groton, Conn.)—18 credits of graduate core courses; six additional credits of graduate course work; CHM 642 (1 credit, taken in Kingston), CHM 551 (minimum 5 credits); and a written take-home comprehensive exam.

Doctor of Philosophy

Admission requirements: same as for master’s degree.

Program requirements: successful completion of qualifying examination; 15 credits of graduate core courses; one additional graduate-level course in chemistry; and CHM 642-644 (3 credits). Comprehensive examination and dissertation.

Civil and Environmental Engineering

M.S., Ph.D.

401.874.2692

Faculty: Professor Tsiatas, chair; Associate Professor Gindy, director of graduate studies. Professors Lee, Veyera, and Wright; Associate Professors Baxter, Hunter, Karamanlidis, Thiem, and Thomas; Assistant Professor Craver; Adjunct Professors Harr and O’Neill; Adjunct Assistant Professors Badorek and George; Professors Emeriti Kovacs, Marcus, McEwen, Poon, and Urish.

Specializations

Environmental engineering: water supply and treatment facilities, municipal and industrial waste treatment, flocculation and coagulation of wastes, solid waste and hazardous waste management, modeling of environmental systems, groundwater pollution, groundwater exploration, coastal groundwater, nonpoint source pollution, stormwater management, river and estuary hydrology, hydraulics and water quality.

Geotechnical engineering: geoacoustic modeling and properties of marine sediments, sediment sampling, in-situ testing, deep-sea sedimentary processes, sediment transport, creep processes, environmental geotechnology, dredge material disposal, experimental geomechanics, soil-structure interaction, constitutive modeling of geological materials, particulate mechanics, applications of nonlinear finite element and discrete element methods to geomechanics problems, earthquake engineering, wave propagation in granular media, dynamic soil properties, liquefaction, geosynthetics.

Structural engineering: matrix and finite element analysis, computer and numerical methods, deterministic and stochastic structural dynamics, earthquakes, system identification, fatigue, design of steel and concrete structures, marine structures, structural stability, thin-walled structures, coastal structures, vibration control, soil-structure interaction, condition assessment and rehabilitation of bridges, structural safety and reliability, structural health monitoring, extreme event analysis.

Transportation engineering: properties of pavement materials, pavement theory and design, pavement management system, highway location, geometric design, traffic operation and control, transportation cost, transportation supply and demand analysis, and transportation system analysis.

Master of Science

Admission requirements: bachelor’s degree in civil or environmental engineering. Candidates in other engineering fields or in mathematics, biology, chemistry, or physics may be accepted with the possibility of additional undergraduate prerequisite courses being required.

Program requirements: thesis or nonthesis option. Thirty credits plus CVE 601, 602 except for part-time students. For the thesis option, the thesis counts as six to nine of the required credits. The nonthesis option requires a comprehensive technical report and a written comprehensive exam.

Doctor of Philosophy

Admission requirements: master’s degree in civil or environmental engineering or a related field. Exceptional students with a bachelor’s degree will also be considered.

Program requirements: a minimum of 42 credits plus CVE 601 and 602 except for part-time students beyond the M.S. degree. Students take between 18 and 24 dissertation credits, including the two-course minor outside of the candidate’s area of specialization, where required by the candidate’s committee; a comprehensive examination; and a dissertation. Although there is no formal departmental language requirement, the committee may require proficiency with a research tool or in a foreign language.

Communication Studies

M.A.

401.874.2552

Faculty: Professor McClure, chair; Professor Mundorf, director of graduate studies. Professors Brownell, Chen, Ketrow, Logan, Salazar, Swift, and Wood; Associate Professors Dicioccio, Leatham, McClure, Quainoo, and Torrens; Assistant Professors Healey Jamiel, Reyes, Roth, and Ye; Professors Emeritae Anderson, Devlin, and Doody.

Specializations

Specializations offered in interpersonal communication, media studies, organizational communication, and public discourse. In consultation with advisors, students prepare for careers in public and private industry, government, or academic areas. Students are encouraged to develop their course plans to foster their evolving academic and career needs. Thus, one might advance specific interests and competencies in areas such as college teaching, communication technology, conflict management, political media, organizational communication training and development, or public relations. Individual specialties can be developed within each of the specialization areas.

For students’ convenience, most courses are offered in late afternoon or evening in Providence and Kingston. Full- and part-time programs of study are available.

Master of Arts

Admission requirements: Generally, GRE General Test (current GRE test format with analytical writing, verbal, and quantitative sections is requested), not older than five years, and bachelor’s degree with undergraduate credit in communication studies. Applicants should submit a paper with a research focus written for an undergraduate course. Students from other academic backgrounds may be admitted with the permission of the director of graduate studies, although some basic courses may have to be taken for no program credit. Nonnative speakers of English are expected to demonstrate proficiency in written and oral English communication (TOEFL score of 230 CBT or 88 iBT for admission; minimum of 250 CBT or 100 iBT, including 23 speaking score, for consideration for teaching assistantships. In all cases, the University minimum must be met on each of the four sections of the TOEFL exam; see uri.edu/gsadmis/gs_apply_int. Applications should be completed online (uri.edu/gsadmis); completed application packets with support materials should be sent directly to Director of Graduate Studies, Department of Communication Studies, 60 Upper College Road, Suite 1, URI, Kingston, RI 02881. Completed applications, including support materials, must be received by February 1 for applicants who wish to be considered for financial aid. Applications received after that deadline but before July 15 will be reviewed on a space-available basis until the program is filled.

Program requirements: an approved program will include a minimum of 30 credits for both the thesis and nonthesis options. COM 501 and 502 are required for all students, and must to be completed prior to seminar or other course work. All students must complete one seminar in each of the four focus areas (12 credits): COM 510-interpersonal communication; COM 520-media studies; COM 530-organizational communication; and COM 540-public discourse. An additional course in research methods, statistics (e.g. STA 409 or PSY/STA 532), or data analysis is strongly recommended.

For the thesis option, the requirements are 24 course credits plus thesis (6 credits) and its oral defense. For the nonthesis option (admission with approval of the director of graduate studies), requirements are 30 credits of course work that includes a course requiring a substantial paper based on significant independent study, plus a comprehensive examination. The comprehensive consists of two sections: the written section, which examines the students proficiency and knowledge in each of the four focus areas; and the oral section, which allows for the student to strengthen written answers, and to address material related to the written questions.

For thesis students, six elective credits beyond their 18 specified credits may be taken. For nonthesis students, up to 12 credits of free electives may be taken. A limited number of 500- and 600-level courses in other departments and programs may be used for program credit if approved by the graduate program director as part of the students program of study before the courses are taken.

Students who take six credits per semester, plus one summer, may complete their studies in two years.

Financial Aid

All requests for assistantships must be sent to the director of graduate studies with the application packet. A limited number of teaching assistantships and an occasional research assistantship are available. In addition, some graduate assistantships outside the department may be available, such as in student life or residential housing. Priority will be given to applications received by February 1; therefore, assistantships will be awarded on a space-available basis.

Computer Science

M.S., Ph.D.

401.874.2701

Faculty: Professor Peckham, chair; Associate Professor Baudet, director of graduate studies. Professors Fay-Wolfe and Lamagna; Associate Professors DiPippo, Hamel, and Hervé; Adjunct Assistant Professors Dickerman, Henry, and Ravenscroft; Professors Emeriti Carrano and Kowalski.

Specializations

Analysis of algorithms, artificial intelligence, bioinformatics, computer algebra, computer architecture, computer graphics, computing education, cybersecurity, databases, data mining, digital forensics, distributed computing, real time systems, software engineering, VLSI systems, simulation, theory of computation, vision, and visualization.

Master of Science

Admission requirements: bachelor’s degree in computer science or a closely related field. Applicants with a bachelor’s degree in an unrelated field will be considered provided they have completed course work covering the material in CSC 211, 212, 301, 305, 340 and MTH 141, 142, 215, 243. Students may be admitted who have completed only a part of the above course work but they will be required to complete the deficiencies before taking more advanced classes.

The GRE General test is required. A subject test in computer science or a related field is not required but may be considered by the admission committee.

Program requirements: The M.S. curriculum in computer science has three tracks: thesis, nonthesis, and applied nonthesis. For the purpose of describing degree requirements, computer science courses are organized into the following groups:

Algorithms: CSC 440, 541, 542, 550

Programming Languages: CSC 402, 501, 502

Computer Architecture: CSC 411, 415, 511, 517

Computer Systems: CSC 412, 512, 517, 519

Theory of Computation: CSC 445, 544

Software Design: CSC 505, 509

Applications: CSC 406, 436, 481, 485, 486, 522, 536, 581, 583, 585, 586

A Program of Study can include at most three courses at the 400-level. Students who have undergraduate credits for a particular 400-level course (or equivalent) cannot repeat the course for graduate credit.

Program requirements for thesis option: 1) at least one course from each of the following course groups: algorithm or theory of computation, programming languages or software design, computer architecture or computer systems; 2) at least five other courses chosen with the approval of the major professor (at least two of these must be CSC courses or approved equivalents); 3) eight credits of thesis.

Program requirements for nonthesis option: 1) at least one course from each of the following groups: algorithms, programming languages, computer architecture, computer systems, theory of computation, and software design; 2) at least two courses from the applications group; 3) at least two more courses chosen with the approval of the advisor; 4) at least one of the ten courses listed above should include writing a substantial paper based on significant independent research; 5) passing a written comprehensive examination.

Program requirements for applied nonthesis option: 1) at least one course from each of the following course groups: algorithms, programming languages, computer architecture, computer systems, and software design; 2) at least two courses from the applications group; 3) at least one course should include writing a substantial paper based on significant independent research; 4) an approved concentration in another discipline consisting of a minimum of four graduate courses in the area of concentration; 5) passing a written comprehensive examination; 6) minimum of 40 credits required.

Approved applied nonthesis option concentrations exist for Computers and Business Management, Computers and Operations Research, and Computers and Statistics. Other concentrations are possible. Students should meet with their faculty advisor to discuss requirements.

The department encourages other application areas in the physical, biological, mathematical, and social sciences. Students in the applied track will have an advisor in computer science and an advisor in their application area. Together, these advisors will approve the student’s program of study.

Doctor of Philosophy

Admission requirements: Bachelor’s degree in computer science or a closely related field. Applicants with a bachelor’s degree in an unrelated field will be considered provided they have completed course work covering the material in CSC 211, 212, 301, 305, 340 and MTH 141, 142, 215, 243. Students may be admitted who have completed only a part of the above course work but they will be required to complete the deficiencies before taking more advanced classes.

The GRE general test is required. A subject test in computer science or a related field is not required, but may be considered by the admission committee.

Program requirements: The student must complete 54 credits of course work beyond the bachelor’s degree in addition to 18 credits for the doctoral dissertation. A program of study can include, at most, three courses at the 400-level. Students who have undergraduate credits for a particular 400-level course (or equivalent) cannot repeat the course for graduate credit. A student entering the program with an M.S. degree in computer science or a related area may be granted up to 30 credits toward the Ph.D. in computer science.

Students must complete at least one course from each of the following course groups (the groups are those listed above in the master’s degree section): algorithms, programming languages, computer architecture, computer systems, theory of computation, and software design; at least two courses from the applications group; and at least two separate semesters of one credit of CSC 592, Computer Science Seminar Series. Other courses must be selected in order to meet the 54-credit minimum and will be selected in consultation with the student’s advisor or major professor.

Students must take a comprehensive examination, which is composed of a written examination and an oral examination. The written examination, which will be held at least once a year, covers the first six core course areas listed above. Success in the written examination is conditional upon obtaining passing grades in all core areas, and is a prerequisite for taking the oral examination. Typically, a student would be expected to take the comprehensive examination within two years after joining the program. The objective of the oral examination is for the student to present an intended research program and demonstrate satisfactory knowledge and understanding of the scientific literature of the corresponding research domain. A candidate whose comprehensive exam performance is deemed as failing by the Computer Science Graduate Committee may, with the recommendation of the committee and the approval of the Graduate School, be permitted one re-examination, to be taken no sooner than four months and no later than one year after the initial examination.

Students enrolled in the program must give at least one presentation in the regular department research seminar series prior to defending their Ph.D. dissertation.

Digital Forensics Graduate Certificate Program

The Graduate Certificate in Digital Forensics is designed for professionals who have a four-year undergraduate degree and wish to pursue a focused program in the field of digital forensics. For more information, including a list of required courses and an application to the program, please visit dfcsc.uri.edu/academics/digital_forensics.

Cyber Security Graduate Certificate Program

The Graduate Certificate in Cyber Security is designed for professionals who have a four-year undergraduate degree and wish to pursue a focused program in the field of cyber security. For more information, including a list of required courses and an application to the program, please visit dfcsc.uri.edu/academics/cyber_security.

Education

M.A. 401.874.2564

Ph.D. 401.874.4877

Professor Seitsinger, coordinator of graduate studies.

Faculty for the M.A.: Professors Boulmetis, S. Brand, S. T. Brand, Byrd, Eichinger, Hammadou-Sullivan, Seitsinger, Willis; Associate Professors Adamy, Ciccomascolo, Deeney, deGroot, Hicks, Kern, Peno, and Shim; Assistant Professors Coiro, and Fogleman; Professors Emeriti Bumpus, Croasdale, Favazza, Heifetz, Kellogg, MacMillan, McKinney, Purnell, Russo, and Young; Associate Professor Emeritus Nelson.

URI Faculty for the Ph.D. in Education Program: Professor Seitsinger, URI Co-Director; Professors Boulmetis, Brady, S. Brand, S.T. Brand, Byrd, Eichinger, Hammadou-Sullivan, Hobbs, Kovarsky, McCurdy, Roush, Seitsinger, George Willis, Grant Willis, and Xiao; Associate Professors Adamy, Branch, Ciccomascolo, Deeney, deGroot, Hicks, and Shim; Assistant Professors Coiro, Fogleman, and Vaccaro; Professors Emeriti Heifetz, McKinney, Purnell, and Young.

RIC Faculty for the Ph.D. in Education Program: Professor Castagno, RIC co-director; Professors Barton, Castagno, Cordeiro, Dufour, Eldridge, Filinson, Fluehr-Lobban, Johnson, Kochanek, Lynch, Panofsky, Ozcan, Ramocki, Rowell, and Stieglitz; Associate Professors Bigler, Brell, Bogad, and Niska; Assistant Professor Horwitz; Assistant Dean E. Sullivan.

Master of Arts

Admission requirements: A faculty interview is required. Individuals seeking to undertake the initial certification options in elementary and secondary education are expected to have a substantial academic background in the field of interest. In addition, applicants should contact the department regarding the required testing, admissions portfolio, interview process, and yearly admission deadline (or visit the website at uri.edu/hss/education). For foreign applicants, a TOEFL score of 600 PBT, 250 CBT, or 100 iBT is required, and the University minimum must be met on each of the four sections of the exam; see uri.edu/gsadmis/gs_apply.html.

Program requirements: Individuals may choose the thesis or nonthesis option. Required are 30 credits for the elementary and secondary specialization; 33 credits for the adult education specialization; and a minimum of 34 credits for reading education; including a required core of at least six credits (a foundation and a research methodology course); two electives (six credits), and an academic specialization (18-24 credits). The nonthesis option requires a written comprehensive examination and at least one designated course with a substantial paper involving significant independent research.

Master of Arts Teaching Certificate Program (MATCP): applicants who wish to pursue the initial teacher certification option of the elementary or secondary specializations take 19-34 additional credits. Students may obtain certification prior to completing the requirements for the M.A., as listed above. See Teacher Certification.

Specializations: Applicants seeking the Master of Arts degree must declare an area of specialization. A specialization may be one predefined by the department or designed in accordance with the applicant’s background and interest. Defined specializations include:

Elementary education—advanced study for elementary teachers; the MATCP option is available for students seeking initial certification in elementary teaching.

Secondary education—advanced study for secondary teachers of English, history, languages, mathematics, science, and social studies; the MATCP option is available for students seeking initial certification in these areas.

Reading education—program leading to advanced certification as reading specialist/consultant. Applicants must hold initial teaching certification in early childhood, elementary, or secondary education. A résumé of experience must be submitted with an application.

Adult education—administration; adult literacy; education, training, and management (ETMS); gerontology; training and development; and vocational education.

M.A. in Special Education

Admission requirements: A faculty interview is required. Applicants seeking special education certification need to have the necessary certification in early childhood, elementary, or secondary education. Applicants should contact the department or check the School of Education website for complete admission information.

Program requirements: The graduate program in special education enables students to meet the Council for Exceptional Children standards and the requirements for a RI special education teaching certificate in the area of mild/moderate disabilities either at the elementary and middle school levels (grades K-8) or at the secondary and middle school levels (grades 5-12). Students complete a total of 36 credits over a three-semester sequence. Students must also achieve a passing score on the comprehensive exams and on all state or University outcome measures.

Applications will continue to be accepted for fall admission after the February 1 deadline until the cohort is full.

Doctor of Philosophy (Joint with Rhode Island College)

Rhode Island College and the University of Rhode Island offer a Ph.D. in education, which prepares scholar practitioners for new professional roles as educational leaders, mentors, and scholars. The program is grounded in the knowledge bases of school teaching and learning. The program’s four objectives provide a framework for the preparation of scholar practitioners to: 1) develop and employ collegial relationships through professional collaboration; 2) acquire and apply the skills and processes of scholarly inquiry; 3) demonstrate expertise in an area of specialization that advances the mission of American education; and 4) implement professional practices that promote progress in educational settings.

Designed for professionals involved in prekindergarten through adult education, the doctoral program admits 12 to 15 students per year. This cohort-based research program is for students who previously earned a master’s degree in education or an allied field or have earned at least 30 graduate credits from a regionally accredited institution. The graduate-level work must include three credits in each of the following areas: a) educational foundations; b) curriculum; and c) research. A major segment of each student cohort will be made up of teachers and administrators from Rhode Island who are committed to developing advanced teaching, leadership, and research skills.

Admission requirements: Graduate Record Exam (GRE) scores no older than 5 years, official transcripts, curriculum vita, and letters of recommendation are required. Finalists in the application process must participate in a personal interview. Applicants are admitted for the fall semester only. The completed application package must be received by January 27. The program is offered jointly by the two institutions with single admission and administrative processes. Prospective applicants should address inquiries concerning the program to one of the co-directors at either Rhode Island College or URI. All applicants must complete the electronic graduate application for admission, available online at uri.edu/gsadmis.

Program requirements: the program requires a minimum of 56 credits beyond the master’s degree or 86 graduate credits. Three year-long core seminars emphasize different aspects of education from history, culture, and foundations, to curriculum development, teaching, and learning, and finally to administration, leadership, and policy analysis (EDP 610, 611; 620, 621; 630, 631, for a total of 18 credits). Field research seminars (EDP 641, taken four times for a total of four credits) are taken in parallel with the core seminars. Field-based research (EDP 622, two credits, taken in the second year) explores community service and service learning in the context of schools. Students gain research expertise to help their development as school leaders through course work (EDP 612, 613, 623 for a total of ten credits) and the field research seminars. Scholarly expertise in a professional area is acquired through specialization courses (12 credits).

All students must complete a doctoral dissertation (12 credits). To progress through this program, students must 1) receive positive recommendations from core seminar professors; 2) pass a qualifying examination upon completion of the first core seminar (EDP 610, 611) and the first two courses in research methodology (EDP 612 and 613) if they have not previously completed a master’s degree in education or a closely related field; 3) pass a comprehensive examination after completion of all core seminars and research courses; and 4) complete a successful dissertation and defense.

Electrical Engineering

M.S., Ph.D.

401.874.2506

Faculty: Professor Fischer, chair; Associate Professor Vetter, director of graduate studies; Professors Boudreaux-Bartels, Kay, Kumaresan, Lo, Mardix, Ohley, Ying Sun, Sunak, Swaszek, Vaccaro, and Q. Yang; Associate Professors Besio, He, Huang, Sendag, and Yan Sun; Assistant Professor Wei; Professor-in-Residence Uht; Adjunct Professors Banerjee, Chiaramida, Cooley, and Harnett; Adjunct Associate Professor Jennanne; Adjunct Associate Professor Davis; Adjunct Assistant Professors Sarma and Sepe; Professors Emeriti Daly, Haas, Jackson, Lengyel, Lindgren, Mitra, Sadasiv, Spence, and Tufts.

Specializations

Acoustics and underwater acoustics: communication, detection, classification, and localization for underwater acoustic channels, speech processing.

Biomedical engineering: modeling and control of physiological systems; medical instrumentation and biosignal processing, pattern recognition and image processing (texture analysis, image classification, and segmentation) in medicine; assistive technology to aid persons with disabilities; cardiac anatomy, electrophysiology, and mechanics and resuscitation; neural engineering.

Circuit and devices: mixed signal integrated circuits, VLSI design and simulation, high-level synthesis and design tools, design automation and optimization, high-resolution data converters, low-power CMOS circuits, device physics and device modeling.

Communication theory: statistical and computer communications; data compression and coding; modulation and demodulation; Monte Carlo simulation; local area networks, reliable and secure communication.

Computer architectures and digital systems: processor architectures, memory structures, I/O systems, reliable data storage systems, RAID/SAN/NAS storages, parallel and distributed systems, FPGA designs, VHDL/Verilog, VLSI designs and layouts, adaptive systems, control and data speculation.

Computer networks: computer network architectures and protocols, TCP/IP, local area networks (LAN), Internet applications, wired and wireless computer communication, network security, distributed computing systems.

Digital signal processing: detection and parameter estimation; prediction and filtering; spectrum analysis; array processing; digital filter synthesis; adaptive filtering, algorithm design.

Embedded systems and computer applications: embedded system designs, hardware/software designs in embedded applications for networking devices, automobiles, image processing, home appliances, and computer forensics.

Fault-tolerant computing: fault-tolerant computer systems, hardware/software testing, error control coding, data protection and data recovery technologies, reliability and availability modeling, system simulations for performance and reliability analysis of computer systems.

Materials and optics: electrical and optical properties of materials, laser-matter interaction, photocathodes; crystallographic techniques for submicron X-ray lithography; radiation damage in nonmetallic solids; mode characteristics in optical and infrared fiber waveguides; fiber optic sensors; fiber optical amplifiers; electro-optic modulators.

Systems theory: control and estimation theory, intelligent systems; multivariable systems; nonlinear systems, modeling of deterministic and stochastic systems; model order reduction; optimal smoothing, filtering and prediction; pattern recognition, classification, computer vision; computerized imaging systems and image analysis.

Graduate Certificate in VLSI

The department offers a graduate certificate in Very Large Scale Integrated (VSLI) circuit design and testing. Students are required to complete four courses from a pre-approved list, subject to certain distribution requirements. Interested students are encouraged to speak with the department graduate program director to discuss course requirements.

Master of Science

Admission requirements: GRE and B.S. degree in electrical, computer, or biomedical engineering, physics, mathematics, or computer science. GRE may be waived for candidates who earned the B.S. degree from an accredited U.S. program with a GPA of 3.00 or higher. Preparation in related fields such as mechanical engineering or in the life sciences may be acceptable.

Program requirements: thesis or nonthesis option—minimum of 30 credits in science and engineering with a minimum of 16 credits in graduate-level electrical engineering courses. One credit of the departmental seminar (ELE 601 and/or 602) is required of all students. Up to two credits of seminar may be used toward the 30-credit master’s requirement. Individual programs are designed in accordance with students’ backgrounds and interests, but require departmental and Graduate School approval. For the thesis option, the thesis counts as six to nine credits. For the nonthesis option, a written master’s examination and one course involving significant independent research and a substantial paper are required.

Accelerated Five-Year B.S./M.S. Degree Program

See Electrical Engineering in the Undergraduate section of this catalog.

Doctor of Philosophy

Admission requirements: GRE and M.S. degree or equivalent in electrical, computer, or biomedical engineering, physics, mathematics, or computer science, or a related field. Exceptional candidates may be admitted directly from the B.S. degree.

Program requirements: a minimum of 72 credits beyond the B.S. degree. The M.S. degree may count up to 30 of these credits; the remaining credits are split between course work and dissertation research. Students with an M.S. in an appropriate field complete between 18-24 dissertation credits; students without the M.S. may take between 18 and 30 (in either case additional dissertation credits may be taken for no program credit). A qualifying examination is required. A comprehensive examination is required after all formal course work is completed. Two credits of the departmental seminar (ELE 601 and 602) are required of all students. These credits may not be counted as part of the 42 credits required beyond the master’s degree.

English

M.A., M.A./M.L.I.S., Ph.D.

401.874.4663

Faculty: Associate Professor Trimm, chair; Associate Professor Davis, director of graduate studies (Literature and Culture); Associate Professor M. Pennell, director of graduate studies (Rhetoric). Professors Cappello, Donnelly, Gititi, Leo, Mandel, Reynolds, Schwegler, Stein, and Walton; Associate Professors Barber, Betensky, Covino, Dyehouse, Karno, Martin, Miles, and Rojas; Assistant Professors Druschke, Eron, Faflik, Hensley Owens, Jones, Valentino, and Williams; Professors Emeriti Arakelian, Burke, Campbell, Cuddy, Dvorak, Neuse, Pearlman, and Shamoon; Associate Professor Emeritus Cane.

Specializations

Literature and culture; rhetoric and composition studies.

Master of Arts

Admission requirements: a B.A. in English or the equivalent, with a grade point average of B (3.00 on a 4.00 scale) or better in all English courses. Complete application packages are to be sent directly to the Director of Graduate Studies, English Department, Swan Hall, University of Rhode Island, and must be received by January 15. Applicants will be accepted for September admission only. A writing sample of 20 pages maximum is required. Nonnative speakers of English must have a minimum score of 91 on the TOEFL iBT in order to be considered for admission, and the University minimum must be met on each of the four sections of the exam; see uri.edu/gsadmis/gs_apply_int.

Program requirements: 30 credits, including ENG 595 (master’s project) or ENG 599 (master’s thesis). ENG 510, 511, and 514 are required. The specialization in rhetoric and composition studies requires ENG 514 and WRT 512, 524, and 599.

M.A. in English and M.L.I.S. Cooperative Program

By proper selection of course work, a student may simultaneously earn the degree of Master of Arts in English and Master of Library and Information Studies.

Admission requirements: Requirements listed for English and library science. Applicant must apply and be accepted in both programs. The application for each program must indicate English/library and information studies as the field of specialization.

Program requirements: Students must submit individual programs of study for the 36-credit M.L.I.S. program and the 30-credit M.A. in English. The integrated pursuit of the two degrees makes it possible for six credits of appropriately selected course work from one program to serve as electives in the other, and for six credits of course work to be applied in the opposite direction. Thus, when planned and taken jointly, the two programs can be completed with a total of 54 credits rather than 66. Students must complete at least 30 credits in librarianship and at least 24 credits in English.

Doctor of Philosophy

The Ph.D. program stresses faculty/student mentoring. Admission is competitive and based mainly on academic merit, demonstrated capability to do research, and the match of research interests between the applicant and faculty in indicated or developing areas of specialization.

Admission requirements: M.A. in English or equivalent. Although grades are not the only criterion, applicants having less than a 3.50 grade point average (on a 4.00 scale) have a low probability for admission. Complete application packages must be received by January 15. Applicants will be accepted for September admission only. The GRE test is required; effective Fall 2013, the GRE Literature in English test is required for applicants in literature. A writing sample of 20 pages maximum is required. Nonnative speakers of English must have a minimum score of 91 (iBT) on the TOEFL in order to be considered for admission, and the University minimum must be met on each of the four sections of the exam; see uri.edu/gsadmis/gs_apply_int.

Program requirements: 72 credits—30 credits approved for M.A. work; 24 credits of course work plus 18 credits of dissertation research. ENG 510, 511, and 514 are required. Candidates must pass comprehensive exams per area of specialization; a dissertation and an oral defense are required. The specialization in rhetoric and composition studies requires ENG 514 and WRT 512, 524, 645, and 699. Core dissertation committee must include faculty in area of specialization. Interdisciplinary study is encouraged, including coursework in other departments. A limited number of 500- and 600-level courses in other departments and programs may be used for program credit if approved as part of the student’s program of study before the courses are taken. (In some cases, a research tool may be required by a student’s doctoral committee in consultation with the director of graduate studies.)

Financial Aid

All requests for assistantships must be sent to the director of graduate studies with the application packet.

Environmental and Natural Resource Economics

M.S., Ph.D.

401.874.2471

Faculty: Professor J.L. Anderson, chair; Associate Professor C. Anderson, director of graduate studies. Professors Gates, Grigalunas, Opaluch, Roheim, and Swallow; Assistant Professors Schnier, E. Uchida, and H. Uchida; Adjunct Professors Asche, Holland, Mazzotta, and Rubino; Professors Emeriti Gates, Sutinen, and Tyrrell.

Specializations

Environmental economics, renewable and nonrenewable natural resource economics, fisheries management, international fisheries development, international trade, fisheries marketing, coastal zone land use and management, quality of the marine environment, aquaculture economics, offshore oil and gas management, and natural resource pricing policies.

Master of Science

Admission requirements: the GRE is required. A strong undergraduate record in economics, statistics, and mathematics is highly desirable.

Program requirements: for the thesis option, 24 credits including EEC 501, 502, 528, 534, 535, and 576, in addition to a written comprehensive examination, and at least six EEC 599 M.S. thesis credits. For the nonthesis option, 33 credits including 501, 502, 528, 534, 535, and 576, in addition to a written comprehensive examination, and one EEC 598 credit given for a substantial paper requiring significant independent research. EEC 501 must be taken each semester by full-time graduate students in residence, but only one credit may count toward the program.

Doctor of Philosophy

Admission requirements: GRE, six credits in statistics, and the following courses or their equivalents—ECN 327, 328, and 375.

Program requirements: the Ph.D. qualifying exam is required of students admitted without the master’s degree. EEC 501, 502, 528, 534, 535, 576, 602, 624, 628, 630, 634, 676, and 699 are required. EEC 501 must be taken each semester by full-time graduate students in residence, but only one credit may count toward the program. Students with a master’s degree in a closely related field may transfer up to 30 credits toward their Ph.D. Additional courses may be elected from appropriate offerings, such as economics, resource economics, engineering, geography, oceanography, mathematics, natural resources science, political science, statistics, computer science, finance, marine affairs, and management science. The Ph.D. dissertation will be written on a problem involving marine resources, coastal issues, or an associated industry, such as minerals, petroleum, fisheries, water, transportation, recreation, or waste disposal.

Environmental Science and Management

(Interdepartmental)

M.E.S.M.

401.874.4880

Steering committee: Professors P.V. August, and A.J. Gold, co-chairs; Professors Bengtson, Paton, and Y.Q. Wang.

Faculty: Professors Alm, Amador, J.L. Anderson, August, Bengtson, Boothroyd, Burroughs, Cain, Casagrande, Costa-Pierce, Fastovsky, Forrester, Gates, Ginsberg, A. Gold, Gomez-Chiarri, Grigalunas, Hennessey, Husband, Juda, LeBrun, Marti, T. Mather, B. Maynard, McWilliams, Nixon, Opaluch, Paton, Pollnac, Rhodes, Rice, Roheim, Stolt, Sutinen, Swallow, Swift, and Y.Q. Wang; Associate Professors C. Anderson, Boving, Dalton, Thompson, and Veeger; Assistant Professors R. Brown, Cardace, Macinko, F. Meyerson, L. Meyerson, Mitkowski, Petersson, Sartini, Savage, E. Uchida, and H. Uchida; Adjunct Associate Professor Abedon; Adjunct Assistant Professor M. Gold.

The Master of Environmental Science and Management (M.E.S.M.) is an interdisciplinary, interdepartmental, professional degree program designed for students who seek professional environmental positions in areas other than research. It is considered to be a terminal degree; students who plan to pursue a Ph.D. should enroll in the Master of Science in Biological and Environmental Sciences degree program. The M.E.S.M. degree program serves graduate students from six departments within URI’s College of Environment and Life Sciences (CELS): Environmental and Natural Resource Economics; Fisheries, Animal and Veterinary Science; Geosciences; Marine Affairs; Natural Resources Science; and Plant Sciences. It is administered by a steering committee selected from the graduate faculty.

Specializations

Conservation biology; earth and hydrologic science; environmental policy and management; remote sensing and spatial analysis; sustainable systems; and wetland, watershed, and ecosystem science.

Master of Environmental Science and Management

Admission requirements: GRE and bachelor’s degree in biological science, physical science, environmental science, natural resources, or engineering. Applicants with course deficiencies may be required to take appropriate undergraduate courses for no program credit and to demonstrate, by their performance in such coursework or through a qualifying exam, basic knowledge of the subject matter in the area(s) of deficiency. Application must be made to one of the six specializations.

Program requirements: A minimum of 36 credits of course work consisting of 21-25 credits of core courses, including at least 9 credits in natural sciences, at least 6 credits in social sciences, and at least 3 credits in numerical methods; 6-10 credits of electives, up to 3 credits of which might be an internship (EVS 597) with an environmental agency, nongovernmental agency, or private firm; an independent research project (EVS 598) that culminates in a substantial, high-quality, written report; and at least 2 credits of graduate seminar (typically EVS 501, 502), including a terminal oral presentation. Written comprehensive examination on coursework. Course requirements that are unique to each of the specializations are as follows. Conservation biology: 12-16 credits in natural sciences, including at least 3 credits in plant and animal biology, at least 3 credits in ecology, and at least 3 credits in biodiversity analysis and management; and at least 2 credits of graduate seminar from EEC, EVS, NRS, or PLS. Earth and hydrologic science: 12-16 credits in natural sciences from any or all of the following categories: earth surface processes, hydrology, solid earth materials and processes, or spatial analysis and remote sensing; and at least 2 credits of graduate seminar from EVS, GEO, MAF, or NRS. Environmental policy and management: 9 credits in social sciences from policy, planning, economics, and research methods; 9 credits in natural sciences from any or all of the following categories or from numerical methods: geology, hydrology, and soil science; ecology and management; or remote sensing and spatial analysis; and at least 2 credits of graduate seminar from CPL, EEC, EVS, GEO, MAF, or NRS. Remote sensing and spatial analysis: 12-16 credits in natural sciences, including at least 9 credits in remote sensing and spatial analysis, and 0-7 credits in earth and ecosystem science; and at least 2 credits of graduate seminar from EVS, GEO, or NRS. Sustainable systems: 12-16 credits in natural sciences, including at least 3 credits in natural ecosystems and at least 3 credits in managed ecosystems; and at least 2 credits of graduate seminar from AFS, EEC, EVS, NRS, or PLS. Wetland, watershed, and ecosystem science: 12-16 credits in natural sciences, including at least 3 credits in each of the following topics watersheds, wetlands, and ecosystems plus 3 credits in earth science, soils, or spatial analysis; and at least 2 credits of graduate seminar from EEC, EVS, GEO, MAF, or NRS.

Gender and Women's Studies

Postbaccalaureate Certificate in Gender and Women’s Studies

401.874.5150

The Gender and Women’s Studies Program at URI offers an interdisciplinary graduate certificate program informed by advanced feminist scholarship and pedagogical principles, designed to enhance the educational background and career opportunities for matriculated graduate students or nonmatriculated postbaccalaureate students.

The certificate program requires 9 credits of graduate work in any field and 6 credits of Gender and Women’s Studies (GWS) courses. (These courses may count toward a graduate degree in a field such as psychology, history, or English. Check with an advisor.)

Matriculated graduate students will take 9 credits of graduate study in their program that focuses on women or gender. The 9 credits may take the form of a course such as Women’s History, or A Woman Writer, or Psychology of Women; substantial research focused on women or gender for a course such as Social Psychology, or Special Readings in American History.

Nonmatriculated students may take 9 credits of graduate study in any relevant graduate program or combination of programs (such as communication studies, English, history, human development and family studies, nursing, or psychology), subject to approval by the program director.

Both matriculated and nonmatriculated students will take two graduate level courses to complete the certificate. For further information, contact the director of the Gender and Women’s Studies Program, wmsdir@etal.uri.edu

History

M.A., M.A./M.L.I.S.

401.874.2528

Faculty: Professor George, chair; Associate Professor Sterne, director of graduate studies; Professor Mather, director of Archaeology and Anthropology option. Professors George, Honhart, Rollo-Koster, Rusnock, and Schwartz; Associate Professors Ferguson and Pegueros; Assistant Professors Buxton, Loomis, Verskin, and Widell; Adjunct Assistant Professor Jenson; Lecturers Reumann and Ward; Professors Emeriti Cohen, Findlay, Kim, Klein, Strom, Thurston, and Weisbord.

Specializations

United States, Europe, or archaeology and anthropology option.

United States or European History: Students may complement their work with courses in Latin American or Asian history or with courses taken outside the department, particularly in political science, education, English, and languages. Students might also develop programs of study that emphasize regional studies or themes such as race, gender, or family.

The master’s program in history includes both class work and individual instruction in the form of 500-level seminars; small 400-level courses that include undergraduates; special readings; and directed study courses, as well as master’s thesis research for those who qualify for the thesis option. All graduate work stresses independent research and is designed to promote critical reading and writing. The diversified program-with its requirement for work in more than one field of history and the opportunity it offers of work in another discipline-should be of service both to students who wish to continue their graduate education at the doctoral level and to those who are interested in secondary teaching. Students are required to develop a systematic program of studies with the director of graduate studies during their first semester as a master’s degree candidate.

For special readings (HIS 502, 503, 536, 537, and 588), students participate in 300-level courses and complete additional projects assigned by the instructors. Arrangements are made with the instructor at the beginning of the semester. To be eligible, a graduate student must not have taken the 300-level course-or one closely resembling it-as an undergraduate.

Students may also take up to six credits from the graduate offerings at Rhode Island College (in Providence), or at the Summer Graduate Program in Maritime History of the Munson Institute, Mystic Seaport, New London. These courses must be approved for program credit prior to registration and are included in the six-credit maximum for transfer credit and the 12-credit maximum for advanced standing.

Archaeology and anthropology: Students study method and theory in history, anthropology, and archaeology and the connections among the disciplines. The option is offered in cooperation with the Department of Sociology and Anthropology, the Department of Philosophy, and the Department of Art (Art History). It includes both class work and individual instruction in the form of 500-level seminars, small 400-level courses, tutorials, and directed study courses. Students enrolled in this option are encouraged to work on thematic links across the disciplines such as maritime history and underwater archaeology, social history and cultural anthropology, or ancient history and classical archaeology.

The archaeology and anthropology option serves the needs of students looking for interdisciplinary opportunities in history, anthropology, and archaeology. It also provides essential humanistic and social science training for Ph.D. students in geological/archaeological oceanography.

Master of Arts

Admission requirements: GRE and bachelor’s degree. While 24 credits of history are usually required, majors in related fields may be admitted with permission of the director of graduate studies and the department chair. For the archaeology and anthropology option, credits in anthropology, archaeology, art history, and related fields may be accepted with permission of the director of graduate studies, in consultation with graduate faculty from the Departments of History, Art, and Sociology and Anthropology.

Program requirements: For the United States or Europe specializations, there are thesis and non-thesis options. In both options, the student must declare a primary concentration in European or United States history, and a secondary concentration in another area of history or in a related field outside the department. Students in the archaeology and anthropology specialization may pursue the thesis option or complete a major research paper in HIS 591. For all specializations, an approved program will require 30 credits.

United States or European History specialization program requirements: Of the 30 required credits, at least three must be from HIS 401, 441, or 481 and at least nine credits from HIS 506, 507, and 508. Three of these nine credits may be filled by a 500- or 600-level seminar in another department. The nonthesis option will require completion of a research paper in HIS 495, or, in exceptional circumstances, in HIS 591 with permission of the instructor and the graduate director or department chair. Admission to the thesis option will be granted after evaluation by the director of graduate studies and two faculty members who are familiar with the students first year of graduate work.

In the nonthesis option, the student may earn no more than 12 credits in special readings (502, 503, 536, 537, and 588) and directed studies (591). Nine credits will normally be taken in the secondary concentration. A written comprehensive examination in the student’s primary and secondary concentrations and a follow-up oral examination are required. The examining committee will normally consist of two faculty members from the student’s primary concentration and one from the secondary concentration. In the thesis option, the student may earn a maximum of nine credits of HIS 599, a maximum of three credits of Directed Study (HIS 591), and a maximum of nine credits of special readings (HIS 502, 503, 536, 537, 588). Work in the secondary concentration may be limited to six credits.

Archaeology and anthropology specialization program requirements: Of the 30 required credits, students must select at least three from HIS 401, 441, or 481; at least three credits from APG 401, 413, or 427; and at least three credits from HIS/APG 490, APG 417, and ARH 475/575. Students must take an additional six credits of 500-level history courses, including at least three credits from HIS 506, 507, or 508. Students must also take ARH/APG 465 or 565. The remaining credits are to be selected from the following approved electives: Any 400- or 500-level history course, any anthropology course listed above; any art history course listed above; APG 470; ARH 469, 470, 480; NES 400; TMD 440, 510, 520, 524, 570. Up to six credits of other graduate courses may be substituted for approved electives with approval of the student’s major professor and option coordinator. A comprehensive examination and a follow-up oral examination are required, unless the student is pursuing the thesis option. The examining committee will normally be comprised of at least two faculty members from history, and one each from anthropology and art.

M.A. in History and M.L.I.S. Cooperative Program

By proper selection of course work, a student may simultaneously earn the degrees of Master of Arts in history and Master of Library and Information Studies.

Admission requirements: GRE and other requirements listed for history and library science. Applicant must apply and be accepted in both programs. The application for each program must indicate history/library and information studies as the field of specialization.

Program requirements: students must submit individual programs of study for the 36-credit M.L.I.S. program and the 30-credit program for the M.A. in history. The integrated pursuit of the two degrees makes it possible for six credits of appropriately selected course work from one program to serve as electives in the other, and for six credits of course work to be applied in the opposite direction. Thus, when planned and taken jointly, the two programs can be completed with a total of 54 credits rather than 66 credits.

Human Development and Family Studies

M.S. (specializations listed below)

401.874.2150

Faculty: Professor McCurdy, chair.

Specializations

Human Development and Family Studies: Professor Newman, director. Professors Gray Anderson, Clark, McCurdy, Newman, and Xiao; Assistant Professors Adams-LaBonte, Dice, and Harper; Adjunct Professors P. Newman and Prochaska; Professor Emerita Rae.

Marriage and Family Therapy: Professor Adams, director. Associate Professors Kisler and Sparks; Professors Emeriti Maynard and Rae.

College Student Personnel: Associate Professor Branch, director. Assistant Professor Vaccaro; Professor Emeritus Schaffran; Associate Professor Emeritus Knott.

MASTER OF SCIENCE SPECIALIZING IN HUMAN DEVELOPMENT AND FAMILY STUDIES

This M.S. program is designed to immerse students in a specialized area of human development and family studies, while providing a strong emphasis on policy, research, and practical knowledge of the field. Graduates from this program are prepared for leadership positions in human service and education administration, research and policy organizations, and for advanced academic work at the Ph.D. level.

Admission requirements: GRE or MAT, and 18 undergraduate credits from relevant disciplines, including human development and family studies, psychology, and sociology. Majors in related fields (e.g. nursing, political science, education) may be admitted with the permission of the director of graduate studies. Two letters of recommendation are required with at least one from an academic reference. Application deadline for fall admission is March 1. Applications received after this date will be reviewed on a space-available basis.

Program requirements: a minimum of 39 credits of approved graduate courses that include a developmental seminar; a sequence in policy, research, and statistics; and a professional seminar. In addition, students will select a minimum of three credits in a specialization, such as child development, early childhood education, adult development/gerontology, public policy/administration, family studies, and family financial counseling/education. Students complete a master’s thesis. Students will have the option of including up to six credits of a policy, administrative, or research internship as part of the program of study.

Master of Science specializing in Marriage and Family Therapy

Admission requirements: GRE or MAT; at least 12 credits of relevant preparation, including courses in family relations, developmental theory, abnormal psychology, and introduction to counseling or equivalent courses. Two letters of recommendation should be from supervisors in a related field attesting to observed experience, emotional stability, and maturity. After initial screening, qualified applicants will be required to come to campus for a personal interview. The goal of the personal interview is to determine whether the applicant possesses the full range of academic qualifications, experiential background, clinical competency, and readiness to undertake the rigors of an academically and emotionally demanding clinical preparation program. Program faculty members will conduct the interviews. Selection for admission to this program is competitive and enrollment is limited. Diversity among the students in the program is a major program goal. The program is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation for Marriage and Family Therapy Education. Review of applications begins February 1.

Program requirements: a minimum of 45 credits of approved graduate courses, including 12 credits of pratica and internship, a comprehensive examination, and a research project. This program involves intense clinical practice and requires a year-long clinical placement at approved agencies or the department’s Family Therapy Clinic.

Master of Science specializing in College Student Personnel

The mission of URIs College Student Personnel program is to prepare reflective practitioners for professional careers in student affairs. Graduates seek entry-level positions such as advisors, coordinators, directors, and deans at institutions of higher education. Our vision is to engage one another in an extended community of co-learning relationships that inspire optimal development and promote growth in leadership, all based on creating and sustaining the best practices in college student personnel preparation and professional work. The program is designed in accordance with the guidelines established by the Council for the Advancement of Standards in Higher Education (CAS).

For students’ convenience, most courses are offered in the late afternoon or early evening in Kingston. Full- and part-time programs of study are available.

Admission requirements: Online submission of an application through the Graduate School website. Supporting materials must include at least two letters of recommendation (one academic and one student affairs professional), official transcripts of all previous college course work, and a current résumé. The completed application package, including supporting materials, is due for fall admission by January 15; materials received after this date and prior to April 1 are reviewed on a space-available basis. After initial screening, selected applicants will be invited to interview either in person or via the telephone with a faculty representative. Selection for admission to this program is competitive and enrollment is limited; preference is given to applicants with experience in college student affairs. Diversity among students is valued by the program and student affairs profession. If admitted into the program, you will be given information on applying for Graduate Assistantships or other direct links to practice in college student affairs settings.

Program requirements: 42-credit program consisting of 26 credits in core HDF courses: 551, 560, 562, 567, 568, 570, 572 [1], 573 [1], 574, 575 [1], 576 [2], six elective credits, a multi-part comprehensive examination, plus one of the following capstone options: nonthesis internship (HDF 580 [2], 581 [2], 583, 584), nonthesis action research project (HDF 595 [6], HDF 580 [1], HDF 553), or thesis (HDF 599 [6], HDF 580 [1], HDF 553).

Certification Programs

Postbaccalaureate Early Childhood Education (ECE): If you wish to pursue a postbaccalaureate early childhood education teacher certification (nursery to grade 2) and do not have a human development and family studies background, you will need to take certain courses from the HDF undergraduate curriculum and should consult an HDF advisor. Students apply to URI’s Teacher Certification Program (nondegree status) administered through the Graduate School and must submit a candidate’s statement, official transcripts of all previous course work, and two letters of recommendation. Applicants must also complete the same ECE admission process as undergraduate students, including the portfolio, admission tests, and interview coordinated through the University’s Office of Teacher Education.

Kinesiology

M.S.

401.874.2976

Faculty: Professor Blissmer, director of graduate studies. Professors Blissmer, Lamont, Manfredi, and Riebe; Associate Professors Ciccomascolo, Delmonico, and Kusz; Assistant Professors Clapham, Hatfield, and Xu; Professor Emerita Bloomquist.

Specializations

Exercise science; physical education pedagogy; cultural studies of sport and physical culture; psychosocial /behavioral aspects of physical activity.

Master of Science

Admission requirements: MAT or GRE with B.S. degree in physical education, exercise science, kinesiology, or related discipline. An applicant with a degree in an unrelated field who possesses a strong emphasis in the sport sciences may be considered. Completed application packages should be sent to the Director of Graduate Studies, URI Department of Kinesiology, 126 Tootell, and must be received by April 15 for September admission, or October 15 for January admission. Applications received after April 15 but before July 15 will be reviewed on a space-available basis.

Program requirements: 32 credits, including 11 credits in core courses and six (nonthesis option) to nine (thesis option) of research requirements. The required core courses are KIN 501 (must be repeated twice), 508, 578, and 515 or 562. The required research courses are KIN 530 and 599 (thesis option) or 591 (nonthesis option). Required courses for exercise science include selecting nine to 12 credits from KIN 559, 563, 564, 565, 524, 531, and 592, plus up to six credits of electives. Required courses for physical education pedagogy include KIN 510, 545, and 580, plus three to six credits of electives. Required courses for cultural studies of sport and physical culture include KIN 478 and 465, plus six to nine credits of electives. Required courses for psychosocial/behavioral aspects of physical activity include KIN 563 and 581, plus six to nine credits of electives.

Labor Relations and Human Resources

M.S., M.S./J.D.

401.874.2239

Faculty: Professor Scholl, director, Schmidt Labor Research Center. Professors Beauvais, Burkett, Cooper, Croasdale, Lardaro, McIntyre, Miller, Molloy, Overton, Poggie, Rothstein; Associate Professor Bodah; Adjunct Professors Keating and Taylor; Professors Emeriti Gersuny, Rayack, and Schmidt.

This program is designed for union, government, neutral, or human resource management, labor, and industrial relations professionals, or for those students who aspire to such positions. Students in other graduate programs may find it rewarding and professionally desirable to enroll in one or more of the labor relations and human resource courses. All courses are offered in the very late afternoon or in the evening in Providence and Kingston so that they are convenient for working students. Full-time and part-time programs are also available.

Specializations

Areas of specialization include labor relations and human resources, both with elective and required courses. Substitutions may be made with permission of the director of the Schmidt Labor Research Center and approval of the Graduate School. Exceptional students who come into the program with a well-defined interest, as well as a proposed plan of study, may choose to create their own specializations by choosing four courses in an area that satisfies their professional needs, e.g., computer science or statistics, economics or social policy, law and legal processes, or workplace issues such as alcohol and drug abuse, sexual or age discrimination, or racism.

Master of Science

Admission requirements: GRE or MAT or GMAT. Undergraduate majors in any field are considered for admission; those with majors in social science, history, management, and labor studies are especially encouraged to apply, as are those with engineering, nursing, education, urban affairs, black studies, and women’s studies backgrounds. Professional experience in labor and industrial relations will carry additional weight in admission decisions.

Program requirements: minimum of 39 credits, including 27 credits in core courses and 12 credits of specialization. The required courses are LRS/HIS 544; LRS/PSC 521; LRS/ECN 526; LRS 531, 541, 542, 500, 551, and 580. For a specialization in labor relations, select two courses from LRS 520, 543, and 545; and two courses from LRS 432, 503, 532, 533, 546, 579, 581, 591, and MBA 577 and 578. For a specialization in human resources, required courses include two courses from LRS 432, 503, 520, 532, 533, 543, 545, 546, 579, 581, 591, and MBA 502, 577, and 578. Students are advised that many of the core required courses and electives in the program assume competence in basic statistics and economics as well as a working knowledge of computers. Students should remedy any deficiencies in these areas either prior to or during enrollment in the program. Please contact the director of the Schmidt Labor Research Center for further advice.

Joint Program: Master of Science in Labor Relations and Human Resources (URI) and Juris Doctorate (Roger Williams University School of Law)

A cooperative dual degree program offered at URI and Roger Williams University School of Law permits dual enrollment leading to an M.S. in labor relations and human resources and a J.D. The integrated program of the two degrees allows a student to complete both programs in four years instead of the five required if both degrees are pursued separately.

Admission requirements: Students must apply and be accepted into each program under the separate admission requirements currently in effect at each school. Applicants must indicate the M.S./J.D. on the “Degree Sought” section of the URI application form.

Program requirements: At Roger Williams University, the J.D. program requires 90 credits, which can be completed on a full-time basis in three years. The M.S. degree in labor relations and human resources at URI requires 39 credits, which can be completed on a full-time basis in two years. A student matriculated in the joint program will take some credits in one program that will help satisfy the overall credit requirements of the other degree program as well. Students in the joint program must complete the following core required courses as part of their 30-credit requirement at URI in addition to nine credits taken at Roger Williams: LRS 542, 500, 551, and 580; LRS/PSC 521; LRS/ECN 526; and LRS/HIS 544. Students who specialize in human resources must also take MBA 577 and 578, while students specializing in labor relations must take LRS 520 and 545. Students must complete the required law school curriculum at Roger Williams. For students matriculated in the joint program, Roger Williams will accept the following 15 URI credits to satisfy the requirements for the J.D. degree: LRS 542, 500, and 580; LRS/ECN 526; and LRS/PSC 521.

Graduate Certificate Programs in Labor Relations and Human Resources

Admission requirements: Applicants with undergraduate majors in any field are considered for admission; applicants must submit two official transcripts of all academic work, two letters of recommendation, and a résumé of professional experience.

Program requirements: To earn a graduate certificate in labor relations, students must satisfactorily complete four of the following courses: LRS 432, 500, 520, 521, 526, 531, 532, 533, 541, 542, 543, 545, 546, and 579. To earn a graduate certificate in human resources, students must satisfactorily complete four of the following courses: LRS 500, 503, 526, 531, 532, 533, 541, 542, and 551; MBA 502, 577, and 578.

Library and Information Studies

M.L.I.S., Cooperative Programs

401.874.2947

Faculty: Professor Hobbs, interim director, Graduate School of Library and Information Studies, and director, Harrington School of Communication and Media; Professors Gilton, Ma, McCarthy, and Mandel.

The Graduate School of Library and Information Studies is part of the Harrington School of Communication and Media.

The Master of Library and Information Studies (M.L.I.S.) degree prepares students for professional service and leadership in libraries and other organizations, including information positions in business and government. Specializations include service to children and young adults, reference and bibliography, organization of information, technical services, information literacy instruction, special collections and rare books, automation, information science, and others. The program leading to the M.L.I.S. is accredited by the American Library Association (ALA).

The School Library Media Specialist certification program leads to both the M.L.I.S. and eligibility for Library Media Specialist K-12 certification in Rhode Island and other states participating in the Interstate Compact. This program is approved by the Rhode Island Department of Education (RIDE), accredited by the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE), and “nationally recognized” by ALA’s American Association of School Librarians (AASL).

Master of Library and Information Studies

Admission requirements: bachelor’s degree (B average); undergraduate GPA of 3.00 or equivalent; GRE or MAT at the 50th percentile or above. GRE or MAT may be waived if undergraduate GPA is above 3.30 or if applicant has successfully completed another post-baccalaureate degree. The completed application package should be received by October 15 for spring admission, March 15 for summer admission, and June 15 for fall admission.

Program requirements: 36 credits, 21 in required core courses (LSC 502, 503, 504, 505, 508, 557, and 595) and 15 in electives, six of which may be taken in courses outside library science when relevant to the student’s specialization; one course (LSC 557) with major paper requiring significant independent research; and a written comprehensive examination. Students in the school library media program must take both LSC 530 and LSC 531. Students who take both LSC 530 and LSC 531 may waive LSC 503. No more than six credits or two courses may be taken in nonmatriculating status for transfer into the degree program.

Requirements for the M.L.I.S. must be met within five calendar years after the date when the student is first enrolled as a graduate student at the University. With the submission of a written request for an extension and a schedule for completion, endorsed by the major professor and the graduate program director, a specific, time-limited extension may be approved by the dean of the Graduate School. Extensions are generally undesirable because of the rapid change in library and information services. If such extensions are granted, courses completed more than five calendar years prior to graduation will no longer be valid, and must be replaced by new courses or reinstated by examination to ensure that the graduate’s knowledge of the field is current.

School Library Media Track: To complete the M.L.I.S. and meet certification requirements, candidates are required to complete LSC 502, 504, 505, 508, 520, 527, 530, 531, 557, and 596. LSC 520, which includes 60 hours of pre-practicum field experience, must be taken in the summer or fall prior to LSC 596. LSC 596, a nine-credit practicum and seminar, includes 12 weeks of fieldwork and must be taken in the final spring semester.

Teacher Certification Program: Candidates who already have an accredited M.L.I.S. degree may apply for the TCP program for school library media. Candidates for certification must apply for admission following GSLIS guidelines and complete the same requirements as M.L.I.S. students in the school library media track. Analysis of transcripts will determine the number of courses needed to complete the TCP.

Certificate in Information Literacy Instruction

A 15-credit post-baccalaureate certificate in Information Literacy Instruction (ILIC) is open to current students (who may take it as part of their M.L.I.S. program) and college graduates with or without the M.L.I.S. Completion of the following courses is required: LSC 504, Reference and Information Studies; LSC 524, Teaching About Information; LSC 525, Multiculturalism in Libraries; LSC 527, Information Literacy Instruction; LSC 528, Instructional Technology in Library and Information Services.

Candidates for the ILIC must apply for admission following GSLIS. guidelines and will be required to earn a grade of B or better in each course. A maximum of three graduate credits will be accepted from another graduate library school program for transfer of credit.

M.A. in History and M.L.I.S. Cooperative Program

By proper selection of course work, a student may simultaneously earn the degrees of Master of Arts in history and Master of Library and Information Studies.

Admission requirements: GRE and other requirements listed for history and library science. Applicant must apply and be accepted in both programs. The application to each program must indicate history/library and information studies as the field of specialization.

Program requirements: Students must submit individual programs of study for the 36-credit M.L.I.S. program and the 30-credit program for the M.A. in history. The integrated pursuit of the two degrees makes it possible for six credits of appropriately selected course work from one program to serve as electives in the other, and for six credits of course work to be applied in the opposite direction. Thus, when planned and taken jointly, the two programs can be completed with a total of 54 credits rather than 66 credits.

M.P.A. and M.L.I.S. Cooperative Program

A cooperative program permits joint enrollment in the Master of Library and Information Studies and Master of Public Administration programs. The integrated pursuit of the two degrees makes it possible for six credits of appropriately selected course work from one program to serve as electives in the other, and for six credits to be applied in the opposite direction. Thus, when planned and taken jointly, the two programs can be completed with a total of 60 credits.

Admission requirements: GRE and other requirements listed for M.L.I.S. and M.P.A. Applicant must apply and be accepted in both programs. The application to each program must indicate M.L.I.S./M.P.A. as the field of specialization.

Program requirements: Each student must complete the required core courses for both programs plus three credits of PSC 590 for the M.P.A. After consultation with, and approval of, both departments, students must file separate programs of study for each degree, indicating the courses to be jointly counted. Each student must pass the separate comprehensive examination for each degree.

M.A. in English and M.L.I.S. Cooperative Program

By proper selection of course work, a student may simultaneously earn the degree of Master of Library and Information Studies and Master of Arts in English.

Admission requirements: GRE and all other requirements listed for M.L.I.S. and M.A. in English. Applicant must apply to both programs and be accepted by both. The application to each program must indicate English/library and information studies as the field of specialization.

Program requirements: Students must submit individual programs of study for the 36-credit M.L.I.S. program and the 30-credit M.A. in English. ENG 510, 511, and 514 are required. The integrated pursuit of the two degrees makes it possible for six credits of appropriately selected course work from one program to serve as electives in the other, and for six credits of course work to be applied in the opposite direction. Thus, when planned and taken jointly, the two programs can be completed with a total of 54 credits rather than 66. Students must complete at least 30 credits in librarianship and at least 24 credits in English.

Other Cooperative Programs

Under existing University policy, students may be able to establish cooperative programs with other master’s degree programs within the University. Interested persons should consult with the director.

Marine Affairs

M.A., M.M.A., Ph.D.

401.874.2596

Faculty: Associate Professor Thompson, chair; Professor Burroughs, director of master’s studies; Associate Professor Macinko, director of Ph.D. studies. Professors Hennessey, Juda, Marti, and Nixon; Associate Professors Dalton and Macinko; Professors Emeriti Alexander, Knauss, and West; Associate Professor Emeritus Krausse.

Specializations

Ecosystem-based management of coastal/ocean areas, coastal zone management, marine transportation and port planning, fisheries law and management, international marine policy and law.

Master of Arts (M.A.)

Admission requirements: GRE and bachelor’s degree in related science or social science. For international students, minimum TOEFL scores on the iBT as follows: Reading, 20, Writing 22, Listening 17, and Speaking 17 (total of 213 CBT or 550 PBT). Full-time applicants are admitted for the fall semester only.

Program requirements: thesis or a major paper and MAF 482, 502, 577, 651; MAF 511 or appropriate oceanography substitute; EEC 514 or appropriate resource economics substitute; plus a minimum of 21 elective credits for a total of 45 credits. Students who elect to do a major paper (MAF 589) will also be required to pass a written comprehensive exam.

Master of Marine Affairs (M.M.A.)

Admission requirements: (1) Individuals with a prior graduate degree or five years of equivalent experience in marine areas, or (2) law students in good standing who have completed one year of full-time study at Roger Williams University School of Law, or (3) students who have successfully completed the comprehensive examinations in the oceanography doctoral program may apply through the Graduate School. For international students, minimum paper TOEFL scores on the iBT as follows: Reading 20, Writing 22, Listening 17, and Speaking 17 (total of 213 CBT or 550 PBT). GREs are not required for admission to this program.

Program requirements: nonthesis program; EEC 514; MAF 577, 589, 651, 511 or appropriate oceanography substitute; plus 15 elective credits for a total of 30 credits; written comprehensive examination. Roger Williams School of Law students may transfer in up to six credits from that curriculum to meet the requirements of the M.M.A. degree. Students in the oceanography doctoral program may count up to six credits of courses taken for that degree toward the M.M.A. degree.

Doctor of Philosophy

Admission requirements: the Ph.D. program is small and selective. Admission is based on academic merit, research capability, availability of faculty, and match of interests between applicant and faculty. Applicants must have completed work for the master’s degree in some related area. GRE, letters of recommendation, writing samples including master’s thesis or major research paper, statement of purpose, and interview are required.

The statement of purpose shall include a description of the intended research topic and the names of the professors most suited to direct the research. Consult the department Web pages (cels.uri.edu/maf) for current research interests of the faculty.

Program requirements: students must complete the following required courses or their equivalents (18 credits): MAF 482, 502, 511, 577, 651; EEC 514. Beyond the courses indicated above, Ph.D. candidates are required to complete a minimum of 48 additional credits, of which no more than 24 will be awarded for dissertation research. The course credits earned to meet this requirement will be selected by the student from among 500- and 600-level courses with the approval of the student’s Ph.D. committee. Students will have to demonstrate proficiency in research tools, foreign language(s), and/or statistics as appropriate for the proposed course of study and dissertation. Required capabilities will be determined by the Ph.D. committee.

Upon completion of course work, students will have to pass written and oral comprehensive examinations in major and minor fields of marine affairs. Each student is to write and successfully defend a dissertation of high quality.

Mathematics

M.S., Ph.D.

401.874.2709

Faculty: Professor Eaton, chair; Associate Professor Kook, director of graduate studies. Professors Finizio, Kulenovic, Ladas, Merino, and Pakula; Associate Professors Baglama, Kook, Medina-Bonifant, Thoma, and Wu; Assistant Professors Bella and Comerford; Professors Emeriti Datta, Driver, Fraleigh, Grove, Lewis, Roxin, Schwartzman, Suryanarayan, and Verma.

Specializations

Research activities are mainly concentrated in the areas of combinatorics and graph theory, complex dynamical systems, difference equations, numerical analysis, and applied analysis.

General Information

Programs of study can be designed for individuals who are employed on a full-time basis. However, all Ph.D. candidates must register full-time for two consecutive semesters prior to taking the doctoral comprehensive examination.

Master of Science

Admission requirements: bachelor’s degree with strong undergraduate background in mathematics. Applicants with deficiencies in mathematics may be accepted subject to taking certain undergraduate courses in addition to the graduate program requirements.

Program requirements: 30 credits (or 24 plus thesis), including at least 18 credits in mathematics of which at least 15 must be at the 500 level or above. A course requiring a substantial paper involving significant independent study and a written comprehensive examination are required for the nonthesis option. MTH 435 and 513 must be completed with a grade of A or B. Recommended courses include MTH 515, 525, 535, 536, and 562.

Doctor of Philosophy

Admission requirements: same as for master’s program.

Program requirements: Two tracks are offered: Pure Mathematics and Applied Mathematics. A total of 72 credits is required. Of these, 18 credits of dissertation work (MTH 699) are required. Within the first year of the Ph.D. program, the student, in conjunction with the Graduate Committee, will select a research advisor (major professor) from the graduate faculty of the Mathematics Department, including persons holding limited joint appointments. At this time, the student’s doctoral committee is selected and the program of study is carefully prepared by the student with his or her major professor. The program of study must be approved by the student’s doctoral committee, the department chairperson or graduate program director, and the dean of the Graduate School. Soon after that, in a similar manner, the dissertation proposal must be prepared and approved. The candidate shall successfully defend his or her dissertation in an oral defense. This is an oral exam, usually two hours long, administered by the candidates dissertation defense committee composed of the doctoral committee and two additional members approved by the Graduate School. This oral exam is in addition to the oral part of the comprehensive exam (see below).

The Department of Mathematics requires that doctoral candidates have reading proficiency in mathematical French, German, or Russian. The specific requirement to be satisfied is to be determined by the major professor.

For the pure mathematics track, required courses are MTH 515, 516, 525, 535, 536, and 562. For candidates without a master’s degree in mathematics, 1) subject to the approval of the department chair and graduate program director, at most 12 credits can be taken outside of the mathematics program (MTH); 2) the M.S. qualifying exam must be passed in MTH 435, 436, and 513. For candidates with a master’s degree in mathematics, 1) prerequisites MTH 435, 436, and 513 must be taken; 2) up to 30 credits from a master’s degree in mathematics may be applied towards the Ph.D.; and 3) all but at most 6 credits of their remaining credits must be for mathematics courses (MTH) at the 500-level or higher.

For the applied mathematics track, at least 30 of the 54 non-dissertation credits must be in mathematics (MTH). Areas of concentration are determined by and selected from among the research interests of the graduate faculty of the program, which includes members of other departments who are formally designated as graduate faculty in mathematics. Consult the Mathematics Department’s webpage for the current research interests of the graduate faculty. Up to 24 credits for courses in the student’s selected area of concentration may be applied to this degree. For candidates without a master’s degree in mathematics, the M.S. qualifying exam must be passed in MTH 435, 436, and 513. For candidates with a master’s degree in mathematics or a closely related area, 1) up to 30 credits from the M.S. in mathematics or an area closely related to mathematics may be applied towards the Ph.D.; and 2) all of their remaining credits must be for courses at the 500-level or higher; permission of the department chair is required if more than 12 of the remaining credits need to be taken outside of the mathematics program (MTH).

Ph.D. Comprehensive Examination. Shortly before the completion of formal course work, each doctoral candidate shall take the Ph.D. comprehensive examinations. These consist of a 10-hour written part to be taken over eight days and, on successful completion of the written part, an oral part (normally within four weeks). The exam is to be taken by the student within the first six semesters of enrollment in the Ph.D. program.

The rules governing the content of the written exam vary depending on which track is being pursued. For both pure and applied tracks, the written exam covers the material corresponding to 10 courses, which are selected by the student’s major professor. With the permission of the department chair and graduate program director, the exams for MTH 435 and 436 may be waived, in which case eight courses are required. The preparation, administration, and evaluation of the written comprehensive examination are the responsibility of the student’s research advisor, the doctoral committee, and other department members assigned by the doctoral committee. Unanimous approval of all members of the doctoral committee is required for passing.

The oral part of the comprehensive examination is two hours long and is conducted by the oral comprehensive examination committee, which consists of the doctoral committee with two additional members approved by the Graduate School. This oral exam is in addition to the oral defense of the dissertation (see above).

It is the responsibility of the major professor to request the permission of the dean of the Graduate School to schedule both the written and oral exams and to inform the Graduate School about the results. Consult the Graduate Student Manual, Section 7.57, for procedures that must be followed to schedule both parts of the comprehensive examination. In case of failing the whole or a portion of the comprehensive examination, the student may be permitted one re-examination if so recommended by the examining committee and approved by the Graduate School.

Mechanical, Industrial, and Systems Engineering

M.S. (Mechanical Engineering ; Systems Engineering)

Ph.D. (Mechanical Engineering ; Industrial and Systems Engineering)

401.874.2524

Faculty: Professor Taggart, chair; Professor Chelidze, director of graduate studies. Professors Datseris, Faghri, Ghonem, Jouaneh, Nassersharif, Palm, Sadd, Shukla, Sodhi, Wang, and Zhang; Associate Professors Maier-Speredelozzi, Meyer, and Rousseau; Assistant Professor Park; Adjunct Professors Anagnostopoulous, Miller, and Jones; Adjunct Assistant Professors Gauthier, Gomez, LeBlanc, and McKeon; Professors Emeriti Boothroyd, Dewhurst, Kim, Knight, Lessmann, and White.

Specializations

Mechanical Engineering

Mechanical Systems/Design—This area encompasses the broad field of computer- aided design including design methodology and computer graphics, as well as kinematics and dynamics of machines, vibrations, design of machine elements, controls, automation, and techniques for assessing reliability. Current areas of research include nonlinear dynamics and vibrations, expert systems, machine tool calibration, control of robot vehicles, kinematic design and optimization, computer-aided design of control systems, structural health monitoring, damage state estimation and failure prognostics, precision machining, surface roughness analysis, and robot-assisted waterjet machining. Facilities include the Design and Automation Lab, Nonlinear Dynamics and Vibrations Lab, and Waterjet Machining Lab.

Fluid Mechanics—The fluid mechanics program includes advanced studies in laminar and turbulent flows, computational fluid dynamics, experimental methods, flows in micro-domains, flows with particulate matter, biological flow. Current areas of research include fluid flow and heat transfer in micro-domains, flow in human airways, computational fluid dynamics in irregular geometries, biological flows and lubrication, and numerical direct simulation flow modeling. Facilities include the Tribology and Fluid Mechanics Lab, Biofluids/Heat Transfer Lab, and Sensors and Surface Technology Lab.

Solid Mechanics—Studies in solid mechanics involve strength of materials, elasticity, plasticity, continuum mechanics, composite materials, fracture and fatigue, vibrations, wave propagation, computational methods, and micromechanics. Applications of these studies are applied to the mechanical and thermomechanical behavior of metals, composites, functionally graded materials, ceramics, and geological media under both static and dynamic loading conditions. A significant portion of our studies has been involved with micromechanical material behavior. Areas of current research include: behavior of materials under shock loading, dynamic fracture mechanics and material behavior, finite element modeling of biological materials, computational simulation of particulate composites, cellular and granular materials, fatigue crack growth, micromechanical behavior of composites, material erosion from abrasive waterjet processes. Facilities include the Dynamic Photomechanics Lab, Mechanics of Solids Lab, Optics and Lasers Laboratory, Waterjet Machining Lab.

Thermal Sciences—The area of thermal science includes studies of thermodynamics, conduction, convection and radiation heat transfer, pollution, and energy processes. Recent research has been involved with experimental and numerical modeling of cooling of circuit boards, micro/nanoscale energy transport, micro/nanoscale detection, imaging, and spectroscopy, nanoscale manufacturing, nanoscale energy conversion and storage, heat transfer and fluid flow in melting and solidification, micro heat transfer, aerosol transport in human respiratory flows, direct control heat transfer with phase change, computation of natural and forced convection in complex enclosures, energy system analysis including heating, ventilating, air conditioning, refrigeration, and electrical power systems. Facilities include the Fluid Mechanics/ Filtration Lab, Biofluid/Heat Transfer Lab, Energy Research Lab, Micro/Nano Engineering Lab, and Sensors and Surface Technology Lab.

Industrial and Systems Engineering

Service and enterprise systems—project planning and management in systems engineering; systems simulation; quality systems; lean systems; design and analysis of experiments; nonlinear systems optimization.

Manufacturing systems—computer-aided manufacturing systems; manufacturing systems: analysis, design, and simulation; product design for manufacture; quality systems; design and analysis of experiments; production control and inventory systems; lean systems.

General Information and Financial Aid

Programs of study can be designed for individuals who are employed full-time. However, all Ph.D. candidates must register full-time for two consecutive semesters prior to taking the comprehensive exam. Some applicants may be required to take courses that are prerequisites to specific graduate courses for completion of the program. Prerequisite course credits might not be counted as program credits. GRE required for graduates of non-U.S. universities except under specific university partnership agreement.

A number of graduate and research assistantships are also available for qualified M.S. and Ph.D. students.

Master of Science

Admission requirements: Mechanical Engineering —B.S. degree in mechanical engineering, applied mechanics, aerospace engineering, or a related field such as engineering science, civil engineering, applied mathematics, or applied physics. Students admitted to the program will be expected to have the equivalent of MCE 372. Systems Engineering —B.S. degree in engineering, mathematics, physics, chemistry, computer science, or management science.

Program requirements: Mechanical Engineering for thesis option, 30 credits exclusive of seminar, including six to nine credits of thesis (required of all full-time students) and 21-24 credits of course work; one course in each of the three department core areas from the following selections: fluid mechanics/thermal sciences—MCE 545, 551; solid mechanics—MCE 561, 571; mechanical systems—MCE 563, 564, 566; and MCE 501, 502, graduate seminar (required of all on-campus students). For nonthesis option for part-time students only, 30 credits, one course in each of the department core areas; one special problems course requiring a substantial paper involving significant independent study; and a comprehensive examination. Systems Engineering thesis or nonthesis option—minimum of 30 credits with at least 15 credits in graduate-level industrial and systems engineering courses including ISE 533, 555. For the thesis option, the thesis counts as six to nine credits. The nonthesis option is available to part-time students, or in exceptional circumstances, to students with permission from the graduate studies committee. For the nonthesis option, a comprehensive examination, and one course involving significant independent research and a term paper are required.

Doctor of Philosophy

Admission requirements: Mechanical Engineering Track —master’s degree. Exceptional students with a bachelor’s degree and superior master’s candidates will also be considered. Industrial Systems Engineering Track—M.S. degree in engineering, mathematics, physics, chemistry, computer science, or management science. Although a person with a bachelor’s degree may be admitted, this program is designed principally for people who have master’s degrees.

Program requirements: Completion of a minimum of 24 credits of course work beyond the master’s degree (exclusive of graduate seminar for mechanical engineering students) is required. All full-time mechanical engineering students are required to register and attend the graduate seminar courses, MCE 501/502 each semester of residency. Additional course work may also be required depending on the background. A minimum of 18 credits of doctoral dissertation is to be taken under MCE/ISE 699. Comprehensive examination and dissertation.

For students admitted to the direct Ph.D. program, the requirements are essentially the same as for a regular Ph.D., except that the master’s thesis is waived and they need to pass a qualifying examination. A minimum of 72 credits is required that would include 45 – 48 credits of course work. Nine of these course work credits may be at the 400 level. The remaining 24 – 27 credits would then be taken as doctoral dissertation under MCE/ISE 699. Students will be required to satisfy the master’s core requirements of their respective tracks. Comprehensive examination and dissertation.

Additional program information can be found at egr.uri.edu/mcise/graduate/.

Medical Laboratory Science

M.S.

401.874.2315

Faculty: Professor Sperry, chair; Clinical Professor Paquette, director of graduate studies. Professors Boulmetis and Goldsmith; Associate Professors Norris and Rivero-Hudec; Research Professors A. DeGroot, L. DeGroot, and Rothman; Assistant Research Professor Moise; Clinical Associate Professors Bozzi, Klitz, and Uhnak; Adjunct Professors Mehta, Mello, Pisharodi, and Vezza; Adjunct Associate Professors Balkovic, Opal, and Tantravahi; Adjunct Assistant Professors Aucoin, Cadenazzi, Gamble, Heelan, Kenney, LaFazia, Mayer, Meglio, and Zielinski; Professors Emeriti Campbell, and Laux.

Specializations

Major specializations in biotechnology, cytopathology, medical laboratory sciences, and public health laboratory sciences; minor specializations in adult education and management.

Master of Science

Admission requirements: GRE recommended; bachelor’s degree in medical laboratory sciences, life sciences, physical sciences, or health sciences (for cytopathology, must include 20 semester hours of biological science [anatomy and physiology are recommended] and eight semester hours of chemistry); certification, or certification eligibility, by a nationally recognized certifying agency, or a minimum of one year’s postbaccalaureate laboratory experience. One course in statistics is required. Applicants with deficiencies in background courses may be required to complete appropriate course work without graduate credit. Acceptance into the cytopathology specialization is contingent upon acceptance into the Rhode Island School of Cytotechnology.

Program requirements: MLS 510, 512, 513, and 551 (or BIO 437, MIC 534 and 538, MLS 520, 590, 591, and 594 for cytopathology), and nine to 24 credits in the area of specialization (for biotechnology: nine credits from BIO 437, MIC 422 and 534, and MLS 501, 541, 571, and 594; for cytopathogy: MLS 561 through 566; for medical laboratory sciences: nine credits from BIO 437, MIC 534 and 538, MLS 501, 502, 520, 530, 541, 543, and 591; for public health laboratory sciences: nine credits from MIC 534 and 538, MLS 501, 541, 591, and 594). The remainder of courses are to be selected from education, management, or other specializations for a total of 33 credits (39 credits for cytopathology). Comprehensive written examination. Major research paper (MLS 512).

The following are recommended for a minor specialization in management: PHP 680 and two graduate MBA courses selected in consultation with your major professor. The following are recommended for a minor specialization in adult education: four courses selected from EDC 505, 529, 582, 583, and 584.

Music

M.M.

401.874.2431

Students selecting the Master of Music degree program choose from two specializations: music performance or music education.

Faculty: Professor Parillo, chair; Assistant Professor Takasawa, director of graduate studies.  Professors Conley, Danis, Kent, Ladewig, and Pollart; Assistant Professors Aberdam, A. Cardany; Lecturers B. Cardany, de la Garza, Frazier, Murray, and Thomas; Professors Emeriti Abusamra, Burns, Ceo, Dempsey, Fuchs, Gibbs, Lee, Livingston and Rankin.

Specializations

M.M. in Music Performance: 12 credits of performance in MUS 510 (minimum of three in a semester) appropriate to the music performance option selected and the principal applied music area, plus MUS 548 (3), 550 or 552 appropriate to the option selected (0), 567 (2), 580 (0), 581 (1), and three credits distributed according to the music performance option selected.

Voice or Instrument option: For vocalists, two credits in MUS 598 and one credit music elective. All twelve performance credits must be in MUS 510A, concluding with MUS 550 Graduate Performance Recital in the last semester of applied music study. Vocalists must be proficient in English, German, French, Italian, and Latin diction, and have general phonetic knowledge and skills that can be applied to other languages. Such proficiency includes language competency sufficient to understand texts in the repertory. The proficiency examination includes written and sung portions, and is given by the instructor of vocal diction. Vocalists may wish to take MUS 583 Vocal Diction to meet the proficiency levels required. For pianists, two credits in MUS 590 or 598 and one credit music elective. All twelve performance credits must be in MUS 510B, concluding with MUS 550 Graduate Performance Recital in the last semester of applied music study. For organists, guitarists, and other instrumentalists, two credits in MUS 598 and one credit music elective. All twelve performance credits must be in the principal applied music area (MUS 510C, E-U, or W), concluding with MUS 550 Graduate Performance Recital in the last semester of applied music study.

Conducting option: Three credits of electives appropriate to conducting. All twelve performance credits must be in MUS 510Y and/or 510Z, concluding with MUS 550 Graduate Performance Recital in the last semester of applied music study.

Composition option: Three credits of electives appropriate to composition. All twelve performance credits must be in MUS 510V, concluding with MUS 552 Graduate Composition Recital in the last semester of applied music study.

All performance candidates must also take nine credits of electives in music history, music theory, or applied areas other than in the student’s music performance option (9), and pass a written comprehensive examination in music history, music theory, and the performance option after 15 hours have been completed. A minimum of 30 credits is required for graduation.

M.M. in Music Education: MUS 548 (3), 579 (2), 580 (0), 581 (1), six credits in graduate music education courses (6), and nine credits in one of the following music education options (9):

Performance/essay option: Six credits of MUS 510 (three semesters at two credits each, or two semesters at three credits each), concluding with 550 (0) in the last semester of applied music study, and 570 (3).

Conducting option: Four credits of MUS 510Y (two semesters at two credits each, or one semester at four credits) and four credits of MUS 510Z (two semesters at two credits each, or one semester at four credits) concluding with MUS 551 (1) in the last semester of applied music study.

Composition (classical or studio) option: Six credits of MUS 510V (three semesters at two credits each, or two semesters at three credits each) concluding with 552 (0) in the last semester of applied music study and MUS 510Y or MUS 510Z (3). Credits recommended for studio composition are MUS 510V in jazz arranging and composition, MUS 579 in the jazz/studio area (e.g., a professional recording studio), 596, or 598J.

Thesis option: at least six credits in MUS 599 and three elective credits.

All music education candidates must also take a minimum of nine credits of electives in music history, music theory, or applied areas other than in the student’s music education option (9). Students in a thesis option must pass a written qualifying examination before thesis work is begun and defend the thesis in a final oral examination. All other music education candidates must pass a written comprehensive examination in music history, theory, and music education after 15 or more graduate credits have been completed. A minimum of 30 credits is required for graduation.

Graduate Teacher Certification Program: The graduate teacher certification program is taken at the graduate level, in conjunction with the music education specialization in Master of Music degree. It presumes that a candidate has completed the equivalent of the URI Bachelor of Music degree program with courses in music theory, music history, performance, and vocal and instrumental ensembles. Additional requirements include the MUS 169-179 Performance Classes; MUS 311 and 312 Conducting; MUS 416 Form or MUS 417 Instrumentation and Choral Arranging; MUS 238, 339, 340 Methods; PSY 113; EDC 250; MUS 341; and EDC 484 Student Teaching; MUS 480 Graduate Portfolio in Music; and the piano proficiency examination. Advanced standing by examination in the above areas is possible. Certain 500-level music education courses may be used as substitutes with permission of the department.

Students pursuing the graduate teacher certification must also apply for admission to the Office of Teacher Education in the School of Education; see Teacher Certification and Education in the undergraduate section of this catalog for admission requirements. The piano proficiency examination, the Praxis II: Principles of Learning and Praxis II: Music Content Knowledge, and all courses required for the graduate teacher certification program, with the exception of MUS 480 [capstone], must be successfully completed before supervised student teaching (EDC 484). The passing score for Praxis II: Principles of Learning is 167, and for Praxis II: Music Content Knowledge is 153. Students may wish to enroll in EDC 312 (3) in order to prepare the Praxis II: Principles of Learning.

Completion of the teacher certification program can require as many as 36 credits (or more, if remedial studies in music are needed) in addition to what is required for the M.M. degree alone.

Master of Music

Admission requirements: undergraduate major, or the equivalent, in music with a grade point average of 2.50 or above. M.M. in Music Performance. Voice or instrument option: Audition or an audition tape. Deficiencies may be made up by study at the MUS 410 level. Conducting option: Audition or an audition tape. Deficiencies may be made up by study at the MUS 311 or 312 levels. Composition option: A portfolio of original compositions. Deficiencies may be made up by study at the MUS 410V level. M.M. in Music Education. Performance/essay option: Audition or an audition tape. Deficiencies may be made up by study at the MUS 410 level. Conducting option: Evidence of baton technique must be demonstrated through an audition or videotape. Composition option: Scores and tapes of original compositions. Deficiencies may be made up by study at the MUS 410V level. Thesis option: Writing sample of a major paper from undergraduate work or the equivalent.

Program requirements: post-admission placement examinations in appropriate areas (music history, theory, composition, and/or music education) determine whether background deficiencies must be made up with no program credit. A minimum of 30 credits is required for graduation. One-half of the program credits must be at the 500 level. (The graduate teacher certification program requires additional courses in education at the undergraduate level.)

Neuroscience

M.S., Ph.D.

401.874.4233, uri.edu/gsadmis/inp

The Interdisciplinary Neuroscience Program involves faculty from the departments of Biological Sciences; Biomedical and Pharmaceutical Sciences; Chemistry; Cell and Molecular Biology; Communicative Disorders; Electrical, Biomedical, and Computer Engineering; Mechanical, Industrial, and Systems Engineering; Psychology; and Physical Therapy. It is administered by the Graduate School and an executive committee appointed by the dean of each participating college.

Executive Committee: Professor Zawia, chair, Professors Gabriele Kass-Simon, Lisa Weyandt, Associate Professor Besio, Assistant Professors Mahler and Worthen, Adjunct Professor Mosley Austin.

Faculty: Professors Faghri, Hufnagel, Kass-Simon, Kay, Kumaresan, Ohley, Sun, Webb, Weyandt, Willis, and Zawia; Associate Professors Agostinucci, Besio, DeBoef, Goren, Kim, Kovoor, Mahler, Martin, Seeram, and Sun; Assistant Professors He, and Worthen; Adjunct Professors Anagnostopoulos, DiCecco and Mosley Austin.

Specializations

Dementia and aging; central nervous system disorders; cellular, molecular, and behavioral neurobiology imaging; and computational intelligence.

Master of Science

Admission requirements: GRE general test, a bachelor’s degree in the sciences (or related disciplines), two letters of recommendation, a statement of purpose, and transcripts of all previous degrees are required. Applicants are encouraged to specify in their statement of purpose one or more faculty members with whom they are interested in working, and to explain why. Students with deficiencies in undergraduate courses relevant to their Program of Study may be required to take additional courses without program credit.

In general, students will be admitted if they meet the minimum GRE requirements (a combined verbal and quantitative score of 300 in the new system and 1,100 in the old system), a minimum GPA of 3.00, good letters of recommendation, and an acceptable statement of purpose. In exceptional circumstances, the student who falls short may still be considered for admission with further evaluation.

Program requirements: The program requires a minimum of 30 credits: 18-20 in coursework, 6-9 in research, and 1-6 in electives. Required courses include: NEU 502, 503, 504; PSY 532; as well as at least one credit NEU 581/582. A thesis proposal and successful defense of thesis are required. In the final semester, a formal presentation of thesis research is required in 581/582.

Doctor of Philosophy

Admission requirements: Same as for master’s degree.

Program requirements: Successful passage of a qualifying examination or an earned M.S. with thesis in an appropriate discipline, a comprehensive examination, and dissertation defense. As the qualifying exam is meant to be equivalent to the M.S. degree, the examination must be taken no later than the first semester following the completion of eighteen credits of coursework. This examination is intended to assess a student’s potential to perform satisfactorily at the doctoral level. A minimum of 72 credits is required, 18 to 28 of which may be earned through dissertation research (NEU 699). Up to 30 transfer credits will be accepted for students who have already earned an M.S. degree. Registration in NEU 581 and 582 is required for one year, and successful completion of NEU 502, 503, and 504 are required. Depending on a student’s previous training and experience, certain requirements may be waived at the discretion of the student’s dissertation committee and the Graduate School. Students may also be required to take PSY 532 to remedy deficiencies in background. In the final semester, a formal presentation of thesis research is required in 581/582.

Postbaccalaureate Certificate in Neuroscience

A student who does not seek a neuroscience degree, but instead wants official recognition that he/she has specific training and instruction in neuroscience, can receive a Certificate in the Neurosciences.

Admission requirements: A bachelor’s degree in any field with a 3.00 GPA or higher. Students already enrolled in a master’s or doctoral degree at URI are eligible to apply. Students not in a graduate degree program may also apply.

Program requirements: Students will be required to successfully complete 12 credits of neuroscience coursework including NEU 503.

Nursing

M.S., D.N.P., Ph.D.

401.874.2766/5334

Faculty: Professors Burbank, Dufault, Dunphy, Ferszt, and Schwartz-Barcott; Associate Professors Coppa, Curtin, and Martins; Assistant Professors Erickson-Owens and Hawes; Clinical Assistant Professors Carley and Kenna; Associate Clinical Professor Lavin.

Specializations

For the M.S.: administration, education, and advanced practice nursing (including family and acute care nurse practitioner concentrations and an adult – gerontological nurse practitioner/ clinical nurse specialist concentration).

For the D.N.P.: advanced practice concentration.

For the Ph.D.: clinical nursing research in the domains of client, client-nurse interactions, and nursing practice.

Master of Science

Admission requirements: MAT or GRE; a bachelor’s degree from a CCNE or NLN-accredited program with an upper-division major in nursing and an undergraduate course in statistics. For specialization in nurse practitioner areas, students are required to pass an elementary pathophysiology course with a grade of C or better and have two years of professional nursing practice prior to enrollment in nurse practitioner clinical courses. Completed application package with three letters of reference (academic and professional) and a curriculum vita must be received by October 15 for spring admission and February 15 for summer and fall admission. Acceptance is based on a full review of the applicant’s record and not on any one single component.

Program requirements: 41 credits for administration, 42 credits for education, and 43-46 credits for the nurse practitioner concentrations. Required courses include 14 credits in core courses (NUR 500, 505, 507, 510, and 520) for all students; 9 to 32 credits in the area of specialization (NUR 551, 552 for administration; NUR 503, 535, 538, 539, 541, 542, 582 for education; NUR 511, 512, 515, 516, 517 for clinical nurse specialist concentration in psychiatric mental health; NUR 555, 556, 557, and 558 for clinical nurse specialist concentration in gerontology; NUR 503, 504, 531, 532, 533, 534, 535, 582, and 590 for nurse practitioner concentration in family; NUR 503, 508, 535, 561, 562, 563, 564, 582, and 590 for nurse practitioner/clinical nurse specialist concentration in adult/gerontology; and NUR 503, 509, 535, 565, 566, 567, 568, 582, and 590 for acute care nurse practitioner concentration); 18 credits of restricted electives for administration, 3 elective credits for education; a major paper involving significant independent study; and a written comprehensive examination.

Doctor of Nursing Practice

Admission requirements: For Post-BS entry into the Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) program, the admission requirements are the same as those listed above for the MS program.  A minimum GPA of 3.30 is required for continuation in the DNP program for students taking this option. For the post-MS entry into the DNP, master’s degree in nursing or its equivalent (GPA minimum 3.30); R.N. licensure; national certification as an Advanced Practice Nurse; two scholarly papers (one theoretical, one empirical) or a master’s thesis or equivalent; evidence of graduate course work in concept development and theory (e.g. NUR 500, NUR 507) or equivalent; three letters of reference attesting to the applicant’s capability for doctoral study, one of which should be by a doctorally prepared nurse; a statement of purpose indicating goals congruent with those of the program and institution; a curriculum vitae. Acceptance is based on a full review of the applicant’s record and not any single component.

Program requirements: A minimum of 70-73 credits for the post – BS entry to the DNP and 42 – 45 credits  for the post – MS entry including 500 clinical practicum hours. DNP course work includes nursing courses in scientific thinking, research methods (qualitative and quantitative), informatics, administration/leadership, and evidence-based strategies in health care (21 credits). Practicum courses are continuous throughout the program (6 total credits; 240 hours). Interdisciplinary courses include epidemiology, social and health care policy, and organizational design and decision-making in the Colleges of Pharmacy, Human Science and Services, and Business Administration (9 credits). The program culminates with a capstone practicum (6 credits, 260 hours).

Doctor of Philosophy

Admission requirements: GRE (scores at 60th percentile or above are desirable); a bachelor’s degree in nursing from a CCNE or NLN-accredited program or its equivalent in nursing and a master’s degree or its equivalent (cumulative averages of 3.00 and 3.30, respectively, desired); two scholarly papers (one theoretical and one empirical) or a master’s thesis or equivalent; three professional recommendations for doctoral study, including one by a doctorally prepared person; a statement of purpose indicating goals congruent with those of the program and institution; a curriculum vitae; and a course in statistics, including inferential statistics. Acceptance is based on a full review of the applicant’s record and not on any one single component.

Program requirements: a minimum of 37 credits of course work, including core courses in nursing (13 credits) and cognates (6 credits); electives in nursing (9 credits) and in research methods (6 credits); free electives (3 credits); and 18 credits of doctoral dissertation research, plus written and oral comprehensive examinations in nursing theory, research methods, and one substantive area.

Nutrition and Food Sciences

M.S., Combined M.S. Dietetic Internship Program, Ph.D. (Biological and Environmental Sciences)

401.874.2253, cels.uri.edu/nfs

Faculty: Professor Greene, chair; Assistant Professor Lofgren, director of graduate studies; Professor English; Associate Professors Gerber and Melanson; Assistant Professor Tovar; Adjunct Professor Sebelia; Adjunct Associate Professor Pivarnik; Professors Emeriti Caldwell, Constantinides, Fey-Yensan, Lee, Patnoad, and Rand.

Nutrition Specializations

Nutritional status and food behavior of high risk population groups; dietary behavior change to reduce chronic disease risk; nutrition issues related to aging and weight management; diet and exercise; energy and macronutrient metabolism; metabolic regulation and energy balance and lipid metabolism.

Master of Science

Admission requirements: GRE and bachelor’s degree. All applicants must have completed a minimum of two semesters of chemistry, and one each of biochemistry, anatomy or biology, human physiology, nutrition, and statistics. In addition, students must have completed an advanced nutrition course with a biochemistry prerequisite and an intermediate level statistics course. Students from other academic areas are encouraged to apply but must have physiology, biochemistry, nutrition, and statistics prior to admission.

Program requirements (30 credits): Thesis (6 credits), two credits of NFS 511; a minimum of three credits in 400- or 500-level science courses; NFS 505, 551, and 552; three credits in a 400-or 500-level statistics course. All resident students are required to be continuously registered in NFS 511 or 512, but no more than two credits of NFS 511 or NFS 512 can be used for program credit. Applicants without undergraduate training in nutrition may be required to make up background courses without graduate credit.

Combined Master of Science Dietetic Internship Program

This program is designed for students who want to become Registered Dietitians by including an accredited Dietetic Internship (DI) program with the M.S. degree requirements. The DI has a specialization area in applied nutrition science. The DI is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics (ACEND), 120 South Riverside Plaza, Suite 2000, Chicago, IL 60606, 312.899.0040, ext. 5400, website: eatright.org.

Admission requirements: students wishing to complete URI’s Combined Master of Science Dietetic Internship (MSDI) must have an earned bachelor’s degree with completion of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (“Academy”) Didactic Program in Dietetics (DPD) requirements including coursework requirements listed above for the M.S. as well as a GRE within 5 years. Applicants must submit an ADA verification form or declaration of intent form signed by their DPD director. Enrollment is expected to be limited to eight students. Program information and application deadlines can be obtained at cels.uri.edu/nfs.

Program requirements (33 credits): Thesis (6 credits); NFS 505; NFS 506, 528, 551, and 552; two credits of NFS 511; one credit apiece of NFS 507, 508, 581, 582, 583, and 584; three credits in a 400- or 500- level statistics course. In addition to the program requirements for other M.S. students, MSDI students must complete 1,436 hours of supervised practice experience in health care and applied nutrition research facilities. Students must satisfactorily complete the experiential rotations as well as M.S. degree requirements including defense of their thesis in order to receive an Academy Verification Statement qualifying them to take the Dietetic Registration Examination as well as to apply for licensure to practice dietetics in Rhode Island.

Doctor of Philosophy

Students interested in a doctoral degree will complete the Ph.D. program in Biological and Environmental Sciences.

Ocean Engineering

M.S., Ph.D.

401.874.6139

Faculty: Professor Baxter, chair. Professors Ballard, S. Grilli, Hu, Moran, and Tyce; Associate Professor Roman; Associate Professor Roman; Associate Research Professor Vincent; Assistant Research Professors A. Grilli and Potty; Adjunct Professors Corriveau, Muench, Sharpe, and Shonting; Adjunct Assistant Professors Barton, Cousins, Crocker, Dossot, and Newman; Professors Emeriti Kowalski, Silva, and Spaulding, Stepanishen.

Specializations

Ocean instrumentation and seafloor mapping, underwater acoustics and data analysis, marine hydrodynamics and water-wave mechanics, coastal and nearshore processes, marine geomechanics, coastal and offshore structures, and offshore wind, wave, and current energy systems.

General Information and Financial Aid

Programs of study can be designed for individuals employed full-time. Graduate and research assistantships are available for highly qualified students; some industrial and other fellowships are also available.

Master of Science

Admission requirements: B.S. degree in engineering, physics, applied mathematics, or other technical disciplines. Students with a non-engineering background may be required to take undergraduate courses in thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, strength of materials, electrical circuits, and applied mathematics.

Program requirements: the thesis option requires 30 credits with a minimum of 12 credits of course work in ocean engineering and nine credits for thesis research. The nonthesis option requires permission of the chair and a total of 30 credits with a minimum of 18 credits of course work in ocean engineering, with one course requiring a paper involving significant independent study and a written comprehensive examination. OCE 605 and 606 are required of all full-time students.

Doctor of Philosophy

Admission requirements: M.S. degree in engineering or equivalent; exceptional students with a Bachelor of Science in engineering will also be considered. All students will be required to complete courses equivalent to those for the M.S. degree in ocean engineering if not included in their master’s degree.

Program requirements: a total of 42 credits beyond the M.S. degree (or 72 credits beyond the B.S. degree), composed of at least 18 credits of course work and 24 credits of dissertation research. Courses must include one in advanced applied mathematics, one in engineering or oceanography, and a minimum of two in ocean engineering. Qualifying, written, and oral comprehensive examinations are required for all doctoral students. OCE 605 and 606 are required for all full-time students.

Oceanography

M.O., M.S., Ph.D.

401.874.6246

Faculty: Professor Corliss, dean; Professor Smith, associate dean. Professors Ballard, Carey, Collie, Cornillon, D’Hondt, Durbin, Ginis, Hara, Heikes, Kincaid, King, Lohmann, Merrill, Moran, Oviatt, Rossby, Rothstein, Shen, Specker, Spivack, and Wishner; Associate Professors Donohue, Kelley, Menden-Deuer, Robinson, Roman, and Rynearson; Assistant Professor Loose; Professors-in-Residence Donaghay, Rines, Sheremet, and Sutyrin; Research Professors Smayda and Watts; Professors Emeriti Hargraves, Jeffries, Knauss, Leinen, Pilson, Quinn, Rahn, Saila, Schilling, Sigurdsson, Swift, Wimbush, and Yoder; Associate Professor Emeritus Napora.

Specializations

Biological, chemical, geological, and physical oceanography. Also archaeological oceanography (see below).

Financial Support

A variety of assistantships are available for M.S. and Ph.D. candidates.

Master of Oceanography

Admission requirements: GRE (aptitude required) and bachelor’s degree in natural sciences or engineering. Most international students at GSO have a paper TOEFL score above 600 or a computer TOEFL score above 250, corresponding to 100 on the new Internet-based test (iBT). The University minimum must be met on each of the four sections of the TOEFL; see uri.edu/gsadmis/gs_apply_int. Most applicants are admitted for the fall semester, but admission for the start of the spring semester is possible. No application will be considered that shows an undergraduate average of less than B unless there is post baccalaureate work indicating outstanding ability. To ensure full consideration for admission, the complete application packet should be received by January 15.

Program requirements (total of 30 credits): written comprehensive examination; OCG 695 (two credits); major paper (three credits); OCG 501, 521, 540, 561; six credits in oceanography or other science departments; three credits in policy, management, economics, or a related field; three credits in statistics, data analysis, or scientific writing.

Master of Science

Admission requirements: GRE (aptitude required, advanced in the applicant’s undergraduate major recommended) and bachelor’s degree in natural sciences, engineering, or mathematics. Most international students at GSO have a paper TOEFL score above 600 or a computer TOEFL score above 250, corresponding to 100 on the new Internet-based test (iBT). The University minimum must be met on each of the four sections of the TOEFL; see uri.edu/gsadmis/gs_apply_int. Most applicants are admitted for the fall semester, but admission for the start of the spring semester is possible. Due to the limited number of students who can be accepted as degree candidates, no application will be considered that shows an undergraduate average of less than B unless there is postbaccalaureate work indicating outstanding ability. To ensure full consideration for admission and financial support, the completed application packet should be received by February 1.

Program requirements: thesis, OCG 695, and participation in a regular ocean research cruise. For specialization in biological or chemical oceanography, OCG 501, 521, 540, and 561; for specialization in geological oceanography, six credits of 500- and 600-level OCG courses outside the geological oceanography discipline (not including OCG 695); for specialization in physical oceanography, OCG 501, 510, and any two of OCG 605, 610, and 613.

Doctor of Philosophy

Admission requirements: GRE (aptitude required, advanced in the applicant’s undergraduate major recommended); and bachelor’s degree in natural sciences, engineering, or mathematics. Most international students at GSO have a paper TOEFL score above 600 or a computer TOEFL score above 250, corresponding to 100 on the new Internet-based test (iBT). The University minimum must be met on each of the four sections of the TOEFL; see uri.edu/gsadmis/gs_apply_int. Most applicants are admitted for the fall semester, but admission for the start of the spring semester is possible. Due to the limited number of students who can be accepted as degree candidates, no application will be considered that shows an undergraduate average of less than B unless there is postbaccalaureate work indicating outstanding ability. To ensure full consideration for admission and financial support, the completed application packet should be received by January 15.

Program requirements: comprehensive examination, dissertation, OCG 695, participation in a regular ocean research cruise, six credits of 600-level OCG courses (excluding problems and research courses and OCG 695). For specialization in biological or chemical oceanography, OCG 501, 521, 540, and 561; for specialization in geological oceanography, OCG 540 and any two of OCG 501, 521, and 561; for specialization in physical oceanography, OCG 501, 510, 605, and 613 and any six credits of 500- and 600-level OCG courses outside the physical oceanography discipline. A Ph.D. qualifying examination is required of all doctoral students. This requirement is satisfied by completing, with a grade of B or better, the courses specified for the appropriate discipline.

The Doctor of Philosophy degree in oceanography offers an option in marine policy. Ph.D. students who have successfully completed their comprehensive examinations and obtained approval from cognizant major professor may apply to the Master of Marine Affairs program (see Marine Affairs) to expand their skills in ocean/coastal policy, management, and law relevant to professional positions both inside and outside of government. Students who successfully complete the M.M.A. degree may transfer up to six credits from that program into the oceanography Ph.D. at the discretion of their major professor in oceanography.

Business/Oceanography/M.B.A./M.O. Joint Degree Program

The College of Business and the Graduate School of Oceanography offer a joint degree program in which students are simultaneously enrolled in the M.B.A. and the M.O. programs and may complete both degrees within 16 months. Students take courses in business, oceanography, and economics. An internship with a business is also embedded in the curriculum.

Oceanography/History Ph.D./M.A. Joint Degree Program

The Graduate School of Oceanography and the Department of History in the College of Arts and Sciences offer a joint degree program focused on archaeological oceanography. Students in this program are simultaneously enrolled for the oceanography Doctor of Philosophy degree and the history (anthropology and archaeology option) Master of Arts degree. A twelve-credit reduction (six in each degree) is allowed for students in this program.

Fifth-Year Master of Oceanography Program

The 5th-Year Master of Oceanography program is designed for students who want to enter the program while still undergraduates and earn the degree in the year following completion of their BS. In general, students will take three of the core courses required fro the MO degree during their fourth year, leaving 20-21 credits to be completed during the fifth year. Interested students should visit: gso.uri.edu/5th-year-mo for further information.

MO Graduation Requirements

  • 30 credits including the following,
  • Core Classes: OCG 501, Physical Oceanography; OCG 521, Chemical Oceanography; OCG 540, Geological Oceanography; and OCG 561, Biological Oceanography
  • 3 credits in statistics, data analysis or scientific writing at the graduate level; 6 additional credits in oceanography or in related courses from other science departments
  • Participation in the GSO-wide student seminar series (2 credits) OCG 695
  • 3 credits of individual study resulting in a major paper
  • Successful completion of a written Master’s examination
  • Students in the fifth-year program are required to maintain a minimum GPA of 3.2 in their undergraduate classes and a 3.0 in graduate courses.

Pharmaceutical Sciences

M.S., Ph.D. (Pharmaceutical Sciences)

401.874.2789

Faculty

Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmacognosy: Professors Cho and Parang; Associate Professors King, LaPlante, and Rowley; Assistant Professors Seeram and Udwary; Professor Emeritus Shimizu.

Pharmaceutics and Pharmacokinetics: Professors Kislalioglu, Lausier, and Rosenbaum; Associate Professor Akhlaghi; Assistant Professors Lu, Wang, and Worthen; Professors Emeriti Needham and Zia.

Pharmacoepidemiology and Pharmacoeconomics: Professors Larrat, Rosenbaum, and Temkin; Associate Professors Kogut, LaPlante, and Quilliam; Assistant Professor Caffrey; Clinical AssociateProfessor Marcoux.

Pharmacology and Toxicology: Professor Chichester, chair; Professors Parang, Rodgers, Shaikh, Yan, and Zawia; Associate Professors King and Deng; Assistant Professors Kovoor and Slitt; Assistant Research Professor Ahmed; Professor Emeritus Swonger.

Other Graduate Faculty: Professor Barbour, chair; Professors Dufresne, Hume, and Owens; Associate Professors Goren and Taviera; Clinical Associate Professors Bratberg and MacDonnell; Assistant Professor Cohen.

Specializations

Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmacognosy: Molecular mechanisms of chemical carcinogenesis; mutation and repair; combinatorial chemistry; solid-phase peptide synthesis; screening, isolation, and structure elucidation of physiologically-active natural products; biosynthesis of microbial and plant natural products; herbal medicine; bioinformatics.

Pharmaceutics and Pharmacokinetics: Design, development, production, evaluation, and regulatory approval of pharmaceutical and self-care products as well as pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies using virtual, clinical, and preclinical data, often with an emphasis on population approaches.

Pharmacoepidemiology and Pharmacoeconomics: Health and economic outcomes research pertaining to pharmacotherapy as used in human populations. Specializations include medication adherence, decision and cost-effectiveness analyses, post-marketing surveillance, epidemiologic methods, and quality improvement and measurement.

Pharmacology and Toxicology: Mechanisms involved in disease states and their pharmacological intervention, and mechanisms of toxicity of environmental agents. Ongoing topics include the effects of hormonal imbalances on cardiac function and metabolism in hypertension, biomarkers and treatment of arthritis, developmental neurotoxicity of environmental agents, hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity of heavy metals, pharmacogenomics, drug interactions, drug metabolism and drug transporters, and the development of inhibitors to cell signaling events.

Master of Science

Admission requirements: GRE and Pharm.D. or bachelor’s degree in pharmacy, chemistry, biological sciences, or allied sciences; TOEFL (waived for applicants from countries where English is the primary language).

Program requirements: Successful completion of 30 credits of graduate study, including PHC 502, 2 seminar credits, 6-9 thesis research credits, thesis.

For specialization in medicinal chemistry and pharmacognosy: ACS placement exam (organic) to determine specific program requirements; either BPS 530 or BPS 535; nine credits selected from CHM 427, 521, 522; BCH 581; BPS 525 and 551, and BPS 691A in consultation with students major professor.

For specialization in pharmaceutics and pharmacokinetics: STA 409 or 411 or equivalent; 6-9 credits of 500- or 600-level BPS courses; 3-6 credits of elective in consultation with students major professor.

For specialization in pharmacoepidemiology and pharmacoeconomics: PHP 540, and 550 or 580; six credits of STA 409, 411, or 412; six to nine credits of PHC 599; four to nine elective credits in consultation with student’s major professor.

For specialization in pharmacology and toxicology: BCH 581; one course of either BPS 530, 535, or 587; and three courses from BPS 525, 544, 546, 572, 587, 641, 644, and BCH 582, in consultation with student’s major professor.

Doctor of Philosophy

Admission requirements: GRE and master’s degree in pharmacy, chemistry, biological sciences, or allied sciences, or bachelor’s degree in one of these areas with evidence of superior ability. Qualifying examination is required for candidates accepted without the master’s degree. Qualified students may be admitted directly to the Ph.D. program.

Program requirements: Successful completion of 72 credits of graduate study, including up to 24 research credits, PHC 502, written and oral comprehensive examination, dissertation. Students are expected to attend and participate in the departmental seminars during their entire tenure in the Ph.D. program, for a maximum of three credits assigned to the core credit requirement.

For specialization in medicinal chemistry and pharmacognosy: ACS placement exam (organic) to determine specific program requirements; courses required for master’s degree, plus one additional credit from BPS 523 or 524, in consultation with students major professor.

For specialization in pharmaceutics and pharmacokinetics: M.S. core requirements, plus one additional credit from BPS 523 or 524, 12 credits of 500- or 600-level BPS or PHP courses, and 12 credits of concentration courses. Suggested courses include analytical chemistry, immunology, human genetics, and statistics of clinical trials, microbiology, and BPS 525, in consultation with student’s major professor.

For specialization in pharmacoepidemiology and pharmacoeconomics: PHP 540, 550, and 580 or 640; six credits of STA 409, 411, or 412; six credits of PSY 533, STA 502, 535, 536, 541, or 542; thirty-six credits from either PHC 697, 698 or 699, or additional 500/600 level elective courses determined in consultation with the major professor; elective credits in consultation with student’s major professor. Tutorials may be arranged in areas of special interest to the student, in consultation with student’s major professor.

For specialization in pharmacology and toxicology: courses required for master’s degree plus one additional credit from BPS 523 or 524; BPS 530, 535; two additional graduate-level courses from BPS or BCH /582, in consultation with student’s major professor.

Joint Doctor of Pharmacy/Master of Business Administration Program

The University of Rhode Island Colleges of Pharmacy and Business Administration offer a joint program that allows students the opportunity to develop management and administrative skills as they study for the Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm.D.) degree. This program qualifies individuals to assume leadership and management roles in the health care industry. A unique combination of management and pharmacy coursework, coupled with innovative practicum experiences, provides students with a knowledge base of theoretical and applied information. The joint program requires the student to complete a total of 224 credits.

Students enrolled in the Doctor of Pharmacy program are eligible to apply for admission to the joint program after their second professional year (by July 15). The following are required at that time: GMAT, statement of purpose, résumé, two letters of recommendation, and TOEFL (waived for applicants from countries where English is the primary language).

Joint Doctor of Pharmacy/Master of Science Degree Program

The University of Rhode Island College of Pharmacy offers a joint program that allows students the opportunity to pursue the Master of Science degree while studying for the Doctor of Pharmacy degree. Students may elect to study in any one of the four specialization areas described in the graduate program: medicinal chemistry and pharmacognosy, pharmaceutics and pharmacokinetics, pharmacoepidemiology and pharmacoeconomics, or pharmacology and toxicology.

This program is designed for highly qualified and motivated students who are interested in simultaneously pursuing the Pharm.D. and M.S. degrees. Students are expected to complete the Pharm.D. program as described in this catalog. In addition, students must complete all additional credits required for the M.S. degree, complete a research project, and write and defend a thesis. It is expected that the motivated student will be enrolled during the summer sessions after the fourth, fifth, and sixth years with the objective of completing both degrees at the same time or in one additional semester.

Students enrolled in the Doctor of Pharmacy program are eligible to apply for admission to this joint degree program in the second semester of their first professional year (by May 1). The following are required at that time: statement of purpose, résumé, and two letters of recommendation.

Physical Therapy

D.P.T.

401.874.5001

Faculty: Assistant Professor Audette, interim chair. Professors Blanpied and Roush; Associate Professor Agostinucci; Clinical Assistant Professors Brown, Dupre, Hulme, and McLinden.

URI’s physical therapy program is an entry-level Doctor of Physical Therapy program that prepares students for the professional licensure examination. There is an emphasis on the development of clinical skill and research capability through the three-year graduate study plan.

The physical therapy program is located in the Independence Square II facility and has a clinical service and research unit that includes a computerized anatomical study center, BIODEX and KINCOM muscle performance dynamometry, postural analysis, electromyography, Gait Rite computerized gait analysis system, and kinetic and kinematic analysis systems. SwimEx is available for therapeutic and research activities. Research is currently conducted in the treatment and prevention of spine problems, muscular stiffness, neuromuscular control mechanisms, international physical therapy practice, professional issues, and neuromotor treatment.

Specializations

Research activities are focused on biomechanics, neuromuscular control, muscle performance, neuromuscular rehabilitation, disability, and patient satisfaction. Clinical speciality skills are enhanced through faculty clinical practice and internships.

Doctor of Physical Therapy

Admission requirements: GRE (aptitude test scores at the 50th percentile or above are desired) and a bachelor’s degree with 12 credits of biological sciences (including a minimum of eight credits of human anatomy and human physiology courses, which must include a lab); physical sciences (16 credits, eight in chemistry and eight in physics, both of which must include a lab); six credits of social science, including general psychology and a second level content psychology course, e.g. development, child, adolescent, abnormal, etc.; three credits in mathematics (precalculus or higher); three credits in communications (preferably writing or speech). An introductory statistics course is required, preferably through ANOVA. At URI, this means PSY 300 or STA 308. Courses in abnormal psychology, computer science, exercise physiology, and research design are strongly recommended but not required.

A clinical experience with a physical therapist is required. The experience should include observing and aiding a physical therapist in treatment or evaluation procedures. The minimum number of hours recommended for the clinical experience is 30-40 hours of voluntary or paid time. Most successful applicants demonstrate a diversity of clinical experience and a number of hours exceeding the minimum required in a physical therapy setting. The experience may be part of fieldwork study for credit in a health-related discipline. Evidence of such experience should be documented by a recommendation from the physical therapist addressing the nature and duration of the experience, which should be submitted as part of the application process. Special recommendation forms and a form for the listing of completed prerequisites are available online through the Physical Therapy Department website at uri.edu/hss/pt/. Baccalaureate requirements must be completed prior to final acceptance into the D.P.T. program. The completed application package must be received by the second Friday in December. While applications will be reviewed as early as November 15, applicants will be admitted for the fall semester only.

Program requirements: a minimum of 109 credits of specified physical therapy course work, including 12 credits of internship. This program is a three-year plan of required course work, with semesters at the 500 and 600 levels including internships at affiliated institutions. For internships, the student may have to pay travel and living expenses. A criminal background check and immunizations are required.

Though this is essentially a nonthesis program, a substantial paper involving significant independent research is required. All courses involving clinical skill development require skill competency testing via practical examination. All clinical competencies determined necessary by the faculty of the respective course must be demonstrated as adequately learned by the student in these courses for achievement of an adequate scholastic course grade. (See “Scholastic Standing” in Graduate School Requirements and Policies.) A comprehensive examination is required. In addition to academic requirements, all students must meet professional behavior indicators described in the PT Student Handbook.

Physics

M.S., Ph.D.

401.874.2633

Faculty: Associate Professor Andreev, chair. Professors Heskett, Kahn, Kaufman, Malik, Meyerovich, Muller, Nightingale, and Steyerl; Associate Professors Andreev and Reshetnyak; Adjunct Professor McCorkle; Adjunct Associate Professors Bozyan, Karbach, and Ruffa; Professors Emeriti Desjardins, Hartt, Letcher, Nunes, and Pickart.

Specializations

Astronomy: low-frequency radio sources and optical counterparts.

Biological physics: membrane biophysics, molecular motors, fluorescence spectroscopy and microscopy.

Computational physics: classical and quantum Monte Carlo methods, large-scale parallel computations, optimization, many-body interactions and invariants, finite-size scaling, recursion method.

Experimental condensed matter physics: electronic and structural properties of surfaces and thin films studied via low-energy electron diffraction, Auger electron spectroscopy, X-ray standing wave and photoemission techniques (in-house and at the Brookhaven National Laboratory synchrotron facility); surfaces and interfaces in thin films and multilayers studied via X-ray and neutron reflection and diffraction (in-house and at the National Institute of Standards and Technology reactor facility); epitaxial growth, magnetism in nanoparticles and on surfaces via neutron and X-ray scattering; characterization of electromigration by electrical and optical techniques, Rutherford backscattering, and scanning tunneling microscopy.

Experimental neutron physics: ultracold neutrons used to study beta-decay, neutron optics (at the Institut Laue-Langevin, Grenoble).

Medical physics and nanotechnology: drug delivery, whole-body fluorescence imaging, cancer nanotechnology.

Nonlinear dynamics and chaos: turbulence, Hamiltonian chaos, integrability in quantum mechanics.

Theoretical condensed matter physics: surface physics, phase transitions and critical phenomena, critical dynamics, superconductivity, quantum transport, nano-scale films and clusters, disordered systems, low-dimensional systems, spin dynamics, Bethe ansatz.

Theoretical low-temperature physics: Fermi and Bose quantum liquids, solids and gases; spin-polarized quantum systems.

Master of Science

Admission requirements: GRE and advanced test recommended; bachelor’s degree with major in physics preferred.

Program requirements: PHY 510, 520, 525, 530, 560, 570, and 580 are required of all students. For both the thesis and the nonthesis options, the student will complete 30 credits, of which no more than six may be below the 500 level. For the nonthesis option, at least one course will require a substantial paper involving significant independent study, and the student must pass a final written and oral examination.

Doctor of Philosophy

Admission requirements: GRE and advanced test recommended; bachelor’s degree with major in physics preferred. Master’s degree is not required.

Program requirements: PHY 510, 520, 525, 530, 570, 580, 610, 625 (or 626), 630, 670, and 680. There is no formal departmental language requirement, although the candidate’s committee may require demonstration of language proficiency. Successful completion of a qualifying examination is required of all students. This examination is normally expected to be taken in the summer preceding the second year of studies.

Five-Year Program in Medical Physics

The Physics Departments also offers a five-year program of studies leading to a B.S. in physics and a M.S. in medical physics. The M.S. degree part of the program requires that the student take PHY 540, 545, 550, 552, 555, 560, 565, 691, 610; SOC 224; ELE 562 + lab, ELE 564 + lab. The rest of the courses are those indicated on the schedule in the undergraduate section of this catalog (see “Medical Physics” under Physics in Arts and Sciences).

Political Science

M.A., M.P.A., M.P.A./M.L.I.S.

401.874.2183; 401.277.5200

Faculty: Professor Kruger, chair. Professors Hennessey, Killilea, Petro, and Rothstein; Assistant Professors Hutchison, Johnson, Pearson-Merkowitz, and Xu; Adjunct Professors Leazes and Profughi.

Specializations

International relations, comparative politics, American politics, public policy, and public administration.

Master of Arts

Admission requirements: generally, GRE, GMAT, or MAT, and undergraduate credit in basic political science and political theory.

Program requirements: a minimum of 30 credits, including PSC 553 and either 580 or 583 for both thesis and nonthesis options, depending on area of specialization; nonthesis option requires one course including a substantial paper requiring significant independent research and an oral examination in addition to the comprehensive examination.

Master of Public Administration (M.P.A.)

The Rhode Island Master of Public Administration Program (RIMPA) leads to the M.P.A. degree conferred by the University of Rhode Island. It is a collaborative undertaking, governed and offered by a committee of University faculty that includes adjunct faculty from Rhode Island College. The RIMPA is offered at URI’s Providence campus and provides federal, state, city, and nonprofit officials and agencies easy access to its instructional programs and research expertise. In addition to delivering its degree and certificate programs, internships, and workshops, the RIMPA faculty conducts research into the formation and implementation of public policy and the administration of public and nonprofit agencies. Current research areas include public professional ethics, the training of public managers, water resource management, the governance and financing of nonprofits, state prison administration, the public administration of technology, industrial policy at the state and national levels, and case management in mental health agencies.

Admission requirements: generally, based on the applicant’s undergraduate academic record, current scores for one of the following exams: GRE, MAT, GMAT. Exam requirement waived for applicants holding an advanced degree from an accredited institution of higher education.

Program requirements: This is a nonthesis program. Requirements include one course with a substantial paper and significant independent research; comprehensive examination; internship (may be waived); minimum total of 36 credits including PSC 501, 503, 504, 505, 506, 524, and 573. Competency in computer science and statistics is required and may be demonstrated by completion of a basic course at the undergraduate level. Competence in basic computing skills may be demonstrated by completion of a basic course at the undergraduate level, or, after review by the M.P.A. program director, by professional, worksite training completed by the candidate, or by virtue of the professional responsibilities of an M.P.A. candidate.

Students in the RIMPA program taking elective courses at the participating institutions will be governed by the same regulations effective for courses taken at URI. Under this rule, grades (including failures) for all graduate courses taken at a participating institution will be included in the grade point average and will become part of the student’s record.

M.P.A. and M.L.I.S. Cooperative Program

A cooperative program permits joint enrollment in URI’s Master of Public Administration and Master of Library and Information Studies programs. The integrated pursuit of the two degrees makes it possible for nine credits of appropriately selected course work from one program to serve as electives in the other, and for six credits of such course work to be applied in the opposite direction. Thus, when planned and taken jointly, the two programs can be completed with a total of 63 credits.

Admission requirements: GRE and other requirements listed for M.P.A. and M.L.I.S. Applicant must apply and be accepted in both programs. Applications to both programs must indicate M.P.A./M.L.I.S. as the field of specialization.

Program requirements: each student must complete the required core courses for both programs plus three credits of PSC 590 for the M.P.A. After consultation with, and approval of, both departments, students must file separate programs of study for each degree, indicating the courses to be jointly counted. Each student must pass the separate comprehensive examination for each degree. A student who fails to complete one of the programs may, of course, complete the other in accordance with the separate program of study.

Psychology

M.S., Ph.D.

401.874.2193

Faculty: Professor Morokoff, chair. Professors Biller, Boatright-Horowitz, Brady, Bueno de Mesquita, J.L. Cohen, Collyer, Faust, Florin, Gorman, Harlow, Laforge, Prochaska, Quina, Rogers, Rossi, L. Stein, Stevenson, Stoner, Velicer, Weyandt, Willis, and Wood; Associate Professors Flannery-Schroeder, S. Harris, Robbins, and Walls; Assistant Professors Loftus and Mena; Adjunct Professors T. Malloy and Redding; Adjunct Associate Professors D. Miller and Varna-Garis; Adjunct Assistant Professors Anatchkova, Boekamp, Clair, Correia, Evers, Frenzel, Golembeski, Goodwin, Kollman, Little, Machan, Marrs Garcia, Paiva, Plante, Reiter, and Silver; Professors Emeriti Grebstein, Gross, A. Lott, B. Lott, Merenda, Silverstein, N. Smith, Valentino, and Vosburgh.

Specializations

Programs are offered in behavioral science, clinical, and school psychology. Within each program students can adopt one of the following focus areas: health psychology, research methodology, child/developmental/family; multicultural psychology; or neuropsychology. Students in the school psychology program may also focus their interests in one or more of the roles and functions of school psycholo­gists emphasized in the program such as assessment, intervention, consultation, prevention, reading and literacy, decision-making, early intervention and school readiness, cross-cultural development, and multicultural competence. Students in the behavioral science program are expected to be engaged in research for a substantial portion of their program, and tailor their own program. Additional individual specialties can be developed within each of the program areas. For more information, go to uri.edu/artsci/psy.

Master of Science (School Psychology Only)

Admission requirements: GRE (verbal and quantitative), advanced test recommended. Undergraduate major in psychology or education recommended. Applicants are admitted for the fall semester only. The completed application package must be postmarked by December 15.

Program requirements: Nonthesis: internship; total of 60 credits with a minimum of 30 for the master’s degree plus additional credits for certification as a school psychologist; one course with a major paper involving significant independent research; and a written comprehensive examination consisting of the ETS Praxis II exam in school psychology, and completion of a comprehensive case study.

This program is recognized by NASP as a 60-credit “specialist-level” program and is approved by NCATE/NASP and the Rhode Island Department of Education.

Doctor of Philosophy (Clinical, Behavioral Science, and School Psychology)

Admission requirements: GRE (verbal and quantitative); evidence of research experience; personal statement addressing research and professional experience, interests, and goals; and curriculum vita. All graduate students in the Department of Psychology are expected to be full- time students. Applicants are admitted for the fall semester only. The completed application and all supporting materials must be postmarked or electronically submitted by December 1 for clinical, December 15 for School, and January 6 for behavioral science. See program websites for details. The formal application materials can be obtained from the Graduate School website, and the completed application package must be submitted online. Applicants are evaluated on the basis of previous academic achievement, GRE scores, previous research and professional experience, letters of recommendation (three required), and match between applicant and program goals. For more information, go to uri.edu/artsci/psy. Finalists in the school and clinical programs must participate in a personal interview to complete the evaluation process.

Program requirements: Completion of a minimum of 90 credits (66 course work, 6 thesis, 18 dissertation). Students entering with an approved master’s degree may transfer 30 credits. Research course requirements: a minimum of two courses in statistics (STA/PSY 532, PSY 533) and a research methods course (PSY 611). In addition, all students must complete a multicultural competency requirement, and four courses from among those numbered 600-609. Each of the three program areas (i.e., clinical, behavioral science, and school) also include specific research, content, and application requirements that are specified on their individual Web pages. The research competency requirement may be met by successfully defending a master’s thesis or by successfully completing a research competency project under the direction of the major professor. The research competency project option is limited to those who have nonthesis master’s degrees in psychology. Students who successfully complete the thesis option will earn a Master of Arts degree in psychology. A Ph.D. qualifying examination is required of all doctoral students entering without the master’s degree. This requirement is met by completing, with a grade of B or better, four courses from STA/PSY 532, PSY 533, 611, and those numbered 600-609. These courses are usually completed prior to earning 24-30 credits. For students in the applied areas (clinical and school), course work must be completed in each of the following content areas of psychology: biological bases of behavior; cognitive and affective bases; social bases; individual differences; and history and systems of psychology; as well as psychological assessments, interventions, human development/personality, multicultural psychology, and psychological ethics.

Both the clinical and the school psychology programs are accredited by the American Psychological Association. (Commission on Accreditation, American Psychological Association, 750 First Street NE, Washington, D.C. 20002-4242; phone 202.336.5979). Both programs ascribe to the scientist-practitioner model of training. Program requirements generally include courses in foundations of psychological science, professional practices, research, and completion of an approved supervised internship. Practicum and individual research projects can be specifically tailored to help the student prepare for the professional role of his or her choice. These programs also have a strong experiential base, including field activity in each year. Students are expected to be involved in research for a substantial portion of their program.

Spanish

M.A.

401.874.5911

Faculty: Professor Morello, chair; Professor White, director of graduate studies. Professors Manteiga, Morín, and Trubiano; Associate Professor de los Heros; Assistant Professor Echevarria; Professor Emeritus Gitlitz.

Specializations

The Master of Arts in Spanish helps students advance to a professional level in the general area of Hispanic studies, including Spanish language mastery, and an understanding of Hispanic linguistics and literature as an expression of civilization and culture. The curriculum includes linguistics as well as the literary production of Spain, Spanish America, and the Spanish-speaking peoples of the United States, any of which could provide a field for specialization.

Master of Arts

Admission requirements: undergraduate major in Spanish or equivalent, including 12 credits in Spanish or Hispanic-American literature, linguistics, and/or pedagogy. Promising applicants with fewer than 12 credits in these areas may be asked to make them up without graduate credit.

Program requirements (30 credits): Students electing the thesis option may include six thesis research credits. All course work must be carried out in Spanish unless otherwise approved by the Spanish Section. Course work in URI-approved graduate study abroad programs will be counted toward the degree. Candidates must pass a comprehensive examination with both a written and an oral component.

Speech-Language Pathology

M.S.

401.874.5969

Faculty: Professor Kovarsky, chair. Professors Kovarsky, Singer, and Weiss; Associate Professor Kim; Assistant Professor Mahler.

The speech-language pathology program is accredited by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association.

Master of Science

Admission requirements: Students who are interested in applying to the graduate program in speech-language pathology, and who have not taken the undergraduate requirements, may wish to enroll as post-baccalaureate (nonmatriculating) students to fulfill or begin to fulfill these requirements. The undergraduate requirements—courses needed prior to taking graduate courses—include CMD 272, 273, 274, 276, 278, 375, 377, and 465. Completion of these courses does not, however, assure admission into the graduate program, nor is completion of all the requirements essential for application to the program. Any required undergraduate courses not completed prior to graduate admission will be added to the graduate program. GRE or MAT scores are required for admission. Strong consideration will be given to the cumulative GPA. In addition, performance within a communicative disorders major or prerequisite courses will be viewed as a particularly important criterion for admission. The completed application package must be received by October 15 for spring admission and March 1 for fall admission.

Program requirements (54 credits): Required courses consist of the following: CMD 493, 504, 550 (A, B, C), 560, 561, 564, 569, 570, 581, 582, 583, 584, 585, and 592. Nonthesis option: required courses as noted above; written comprehensive examination. Thesis option: 6 credits of CMD 599 (thesis); required courses as noted above; electives chosen from CMD 492, 494, 563, 571, 580, 594, 595, and 598.

Accelerated Bachelor’s-Master’s Degree in Speech-Language Pathology

Admission requirements: GRE or MAT for speech-language pathology; URI sixth-semester standing in communicative disorders with all major requirements completed and 24 elective credits remaining; a 3.00 cumulative grade point average and 3.20 in the major through the fifth semester; and two letters of recommendation from URI communicative disorders faculty.

URI undergraduate communicative disorders majors who have met requirements for early acceptance in the graduate program in speech-language pathology, which includes successful application to the program, may follow a special sequence of graduate-level course work and clinical practicum during their senior year (see “Communicative Disorders” in the undergraduate section of this catalog for more information). If eligible, following the award of the Bachelor of Science degree in communicative disorders, students may complete a 30-credit master’s degree (rather than the usual 54-credit master’s degree) in speech-language pathology in one year plus a summer of full-time graduate study.

Program requirements: Speech-language pathology students must take 24 specified graduate credits (at the 400 or 500 level) of communicative disorders course work in the senior year to complete the bachelor’s degree in communicative disorders; 30 credits of course work in the fifth year (postbaccalaureate) at the 400 or 500 level. Specific course requirements are as stated in the regular two-year master’s program (see above).

Statistics

M.S.

401.874.2701

Faculty: Professor Peckham, chair. Associate Professor Gonzales, section head. Assistant Professors Katenka and Puggioni; Adjunct Professors Kajiji and Ordonez; Professors Emeriti Hanumara and Heltshe.

Specializations

Experimental design, sampling, ecological statistics and biostatistics, statistical computation, simulation, multivariate analysis, nonparametric methods, classification and discrimination, analysis of variance, bootstrap and jackknife estimation, sequential methods, spatial statistics.

Master of Science

Admission requirements: bachelor’s degree including the equivalent of MTH 141, 142; MTH 243; MTH 215; CSC 201; STA 409, 412. GRE; advanced test in mathematics or undergraduate field is desirable.

Programs of study can be designed for individuals who are employed full-time.

Thesis option program requirements: a minimum of 24 credits (exclusive of thesis) including MTH 451, 452, either STA 501 or 502, and at least nine additional credits selected from STA 500, 501, 502, 520, 535, 541, 542, 550, 592, 611.

Nonthesis option program requirements: 33 credits distributed as follows: 1) MTH 451, 452, and either STA 501 or 502; 2) at least nine credits selected from STA 500, 501, 502, 520, 535, 541, 542, 550, 592, 611; 3) at least six of the remaining credits must be at the 500 level or above (exclusive of STA 591); 4) the above course work must include at least one course that requires a substantial paper involving significant independent study; and 5) written comprehensive examination.

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