Arts and Sciences Undergraduate Programs

Africana Studies

Faculty: Professor Quainoo, interim director. Professors Dilworth, Okeke-Ezigbo, and Weisbord; Associate Professors Harris, and Schwartz; Assistant Professor Ferguson; Adjunct Faculty Barber, McCray, and Smith.

The Africana program is an interdisciplinary program offered jointly by URI and Rhode Island College. Students in this program may take courses at either institution to fulfill major requirements. Students may also choose to study abroad in affiliated programs in the following countries: Belize, Cape Verde, and Ghana. Programs related to the African diaspora may also qualify for AAF credit. The major’s objective is to broaden students’ intellectual and global experiences through the study of Africa and African diaspora.

Students selecting this major must complete a minimum of 30 credits including AAF 201 and 202. Six credits must be selected from each of the following areas: history and politics (AAF 290, 300; AAF/HIS 150, 359, 388; AAF/PSC 380, 408, 410, 415, 466; PSC 372; WMS 351); arts and humanities (AAF/ARH 330, 331; AAF/ENG 247, 248, 360, 362, 363, 364, 474); and social and behavioral science (AAF 300; AAF/COM 333; COM 310A, 465). The remaining 6 credits must be chosen from courses approved for the above groups.

A total of 120 credits is required for graduation. At least 42 of these must be in courses numbered 300 or above. A minor is also available (see Africana Studies) in Interdepartmental Minors.

Anthropology

The Department of Sociology and Anthropology offers the degree of Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) in anthropology.

Faculty: Professor Peters, chairperson. Professor Poggie; Assistant Professors Bovy, Dunsworth, and Garcia-Quijano; Professors Emeriti LaVelle and Loy.

Students desiring to major in anthropology must complete a total of 30 credits (maximum 45 credits) in anthropology including introductory courses: APG 200, 201, 202, and 203 (12 credits); methods courses: APG 300, 302, 412, or 417 (3 credits); theory courses: APG 401 (3) and APG 327 or 417 (3), for a total of six credits. Note: APG 417 may be taken to fulfill either the methods or theory requirement, but not both. The remaining nine credits may be from any APG course. No more than six credits in independent study and/or field experience courses may be used toward the 30 credits required for the major.

It is strongly recommended that anthropology majors take at least one course in inferential statistics (e.g., STA 308 or 409), complete a foreign language through the intermediate level, and gain computer proficiency. Early in the junior year, students who plan to go on to graduate school should meet with their advisor for curricular counseling.

A total of 120 credits is required for graduation. At least 42 of these must be in courses numbered 300 or above. In order to transfer into the anthropology program from University College, a student must have completed at least 24 credits and have earned a minimum of a 2.00 GPA.

Arabic

The Department of Modern and Classical Languages and Literatures offers a number of undergraduate courses in Arabic.

Faculty: Assistant Professor Magidow

Art and Art History

The Department of Art offers a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree with a major in either art or art history, and a Bachelor of Fine Arts (B.F.A.) degree in art.

Faculty: Professor Onorato, chairperson. Professors Dilworth, Hollinshead,  Matthew, Pagh, Richman, and Wills; Associate Professors Anderson and Hutt; Professors Emeriti Calabro, Fraenkel, Holmes, Klenk, Leete, and Roworth.

BACHELOR OF ARTS

Art. It is recommended that students intending to major in art plan to complete foundation studio courses (ART 101, 103, 207) and one art history course (ARH 251 or 252) in the freshman year. For graduation, a minimum of 36 credits in the major (maximum 51) must be completed, including: studio courses ART 101 (3), 103 (3), and 207 (3); art history courses ARH 251 (3), 252 (3); and two art history electives (6) at the 300 level or above, one of which must be selected from the following modern or contemporary art courses: ARH 331, 361, 362, 364, 374, 375, 376, 377, 380 (with topic approved by chair), 480 (with topic approved by chair).

Students must participate in ART 002, Sophomore Review, in the first semester of their sophomore year.  Sophomore review is a special evaluation set up to provide individual studio art majors with timely feedback from the art department faculty once they have completed the foundation courses (ART 101, 103, 207) and are ready to take more advanced and specialized studios.  Eligible students are Sophomore or Junior ART majors (BA or BFA) who have completed ART 101, 103, and 207 with at least a 2.3 GPA in those classes.

Eligible students should: Register for ART 002 in the first semester possible (freshman may register in the spring semseter for the Fall sophomore review).  They should prepare a portfolio of 15 but no more than 20 of their best works from the Foundation courses.  A student should fill out the Statement of Purpose form available in the Department office or website when registering for the course.

An additional six (6) credits must be selected from one of the following sequences of studio courses: ART 204, 304; 213, 314; 214, 315; 215, 316; 221, 322; 231, 332; 233, 334; 243, 344. This sequence must be completed by the end of the junior year. An additional three (3) credits of studio art on the 200- or 300-level must be selected.

In the senior year, an additional six (6) credits must be selected from 300-level studio courses (except 301) or ART 405.  Many students choose to do an internship in their junior or senior year.  Consult with your advisor before registering for ART 307 Art Internship.

A total of 120 credits is required for graduation. Students must fulfill the requirements of the Basic Liberal Studies program and take 24-39 credits in art and 12 credits in art history. Of the 120 credits required for graduation, 42 credits must be in courses numbered 300 or above.

Art History. It is recommended that students intending to major in art history plan to complete a minimum of six credits in the history of art by the end of the sophomore year. For graduation, students must complete a minimum of 30 credits (maximum 45 credits) in art history, including ARH 251 and 252 (6). At least 12 credits must be taken from ARH 354, 356, 359, 361, 362, 365. An additional six credits must be taken from the preceding group or one or more 200 or 300 level ARH courses except ARH 300 or 371. An additional six credits must be taken at the 400 level. At least three of these credits must be taken from ARH 461, 475, 480. It is recommended that students who expect to pursue graduate studies in art history take ARH 469 or 470.

It is recommended that students majoring in art history achieve intermediate-level proficiency in at least one foreign language. Students anticipating graduate study in art history may need proficiency in a second foreign language. Students are also encouraged to enroll in courses in art studio, history, literature, music, and philosophy.

A total of 120 credits is required for graduation. Students must fulfill the requirements of the Basic Liberal Studies program and take 30-45 credits in art history. Students may use an approved course in art studio to satisfy Basic Liberal Studies requirements. Of the 120 credits required for graduation, 42 credits must be in courses numbered 300 or above.

BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS

It is recommended that students intending to enter the B.F.A. program complete foundation courses (ART 101, 103, 207) and one art history course (ARH 251 or 252) in the freshman year. B.F.A. majors should complete a minimum of 24 credits in ART courses by the end of the sophomore year.

Students in the B.F.A. program must complete a minimum of 72 credits in the major. Art courses required of all majors include ART 101 (3), 103 (3), 207 (3), and 405 (3). An additional 18 credits must be selected from 200-level ART courses, and an additional 27 credits must be selected from 300- or 400-level ART courses.

Students must participate in ART 002, Sophomore Review, in the first semester of their sophomore year.  Sophomore review is a special evaluation set up to provide studio art majors with timely feedback from Department faculty once they have completed the foundation courses (ART 101, 103, 207) and are ready to take more advanced and specialized studios.  Eligible students are Sophomore or Junior ART Majors who have completed ART 101, 103, and 207 with at least a 2.3 GPA in those classes.

Eligible students should: Register for ART 002 in the first semester possible (freshman may register in the spring semseter for the Fall sophomore review).  They should prepare a portfolio of 15 but no more than 20 of their best works from the Foundation courses.  A student should fill out the Statement of Purpose form available in the Department office or website when registering for the course.

By the end of sophomore year, the BFA student is encourage to complete at least 24 credits in studio art and at least 6 credits in art history.

B.F.A. students must take 15 credits in art history, including ARH 251, 252, nine (9) credits at the 300 level or above, three credits of which must be selected from the following modern or contemporary art history courses: ARH 331, 361, 362, 364, 374, 375, 376, 377, 380 (with topic approved by chair), 480 (with topic approved by chair). Note: Only 3 credits from ARH 374, 376, or 377 may be used toward the 72 credits required for the major.

Many students choose to do an internship in their junior or senior year.  Consult with your advisor before registering for ART 307 Art Internship.

Outstanding students may be permitted by the Department to substitute other studio courses for the 100 and 200 level courses listed above after a portfolio review arranged by their departmental advisor.

A minimum of 120 credits is required for graduation, including the following: major requirements in art (57), and art history (15). Students must meet the requirements of the Basic Liberal Studies program and may not use an ARH or ART course to fulfill the Fine Arts category of this requirement.

Chemistry

The Department of Chemistry offers a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree and a Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree. The department also offers the Master of Science (M.S.) and Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degrees in chemistry.

Faculty: Professor Euler, chairperson. Professors Dain, Freeman, Kirschenbaum, Lucht, Oxley, Rosen, Smith, and S. Yang; Associate Professor DeBoef; Assistant Professors Dwyer, Kiesewetter, and Levine; Professors Emeriti C. Brown, P. Brown, Cheer, Cruickshank, Goodman, Nelson, Rosie, and Traficante.

BACHELOR OF ARTS

Students in this program must complete a minimum of 31 credits (maximum 45) in chemistry by taking either 10 credits as CHM 191, 192 or 8 credits as CHM 101, 102, 112, 114; and 20 credits as CHM 212, 226, 227, 228, 335, 431, and 432 or 20 credits as CHM 212, 291, 292, 335, 431, and 432. One additional course must be chosen from CHM 401, 412, 427, or 441. CHM 229 and 230 may be substituted for CHM 226.

MTH 141 and 142 and one year of physics (PHY 111, 112, 185, and 186, or PHY 203, 204, 273, and 274) are required.

A total of 120 credits is required for the B.A. At least 42 of these must be in courses numbered 300 or above.

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE

Designed to prepare the student for a career in chemistry, this curriculum provides a thorough training in both theory and practice in the fields of analytical, physical, organic, biochemistry, and inorganic chemistry. Those who complete this curriculum are prepared to practice as a chemist, pursue graduate studies in chemistry, or enroll in a professional school in a related area such as medicine, dentistry, or pharmacy. Preprofessional studies can be focused through the use of electives.

The B.S. degree is accredited by the American Chemical Society Committee on Professional Training of Chemists. Graduates receive a certification card issued by the society and are eligible for senior membership after two years of experience in the field of chemistry. It is strongly recommended that WRT 104 or 106 be taken in the freshman year. CHM 425, 427 should be taken in the junior year by students planning research or advanced course work in organic chemistry. Six credits of “curriculum requirements” shall include either CHM 353 or any 500-level courses with department approval.

B.S. students desiring the American Chemical Society option in chemistry/biochemistry must take BCH 581, 582. Six additional credits in undergraduate research (CHM 353) are also required to satisfy requirements for advanced laboratory. CHM 353 will be supervised by faculty with expertise in biochemistry. Students electing the chemistry/biochemistry option may wish to take additional courses in molecular biology as electives.

A total of 120 credits is required for the B.S. degree. Accreditation guidelines require chemistry majors to take 55 credits toward the chemistry major.

Freshman Year First semester: 16-18 credits
CHM 191 (5) (or CHM 101, 102 [4]); MTH 141 (4), language or free elective (3), Basic Liberal Studies requirements (5-6).

Second semester: 16-18 credits
CHM 192 (5) (or CHM 112, 114 [4]); MTH 142 (4), language or free elective (3), Basic Liberal Studies requirements (5-6).

Sophomore Year First semester: 17 credits
CHM 212 (4); CHM 227 or 291 (3); MTH 243 (3); PHY 203, 273 (4), language or Basic Liberal Studies requirements (3).

Second semester: 18 credits
CHM 292 (5) (or CHM 226, 228 [5]); MTH 244 (3); PHY 204, 274 (4), language or Basic Liberal Studies requirements (6).

Junior Year First semester: 15 credits
CHM 335 (2), 431 (3); PHY 205, 275 (4); Basic Liberal Studies requirement (3), free elective (3).

Second semester: 17 credits
CHM 412 (3), 414 (2), 432 (3); Basic Liberal Studies requirements (6), free elective (3).

Senior Year First semester: 14-19 credits
CHM 401 (3), 425 (2), 427 (3), curriculum requirements (3-6), free electives (3-5).

Second semester: 15 credits
CHM 492 [capstone] (1), 402 (2), 441 (3), free electives (9).

Chemistry and Chemical Oceanography

The Department of Chemistry and the Graduate School of Oceanography offer a Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree in chemistry and chemical oceanography. The faculty consists of the members of the department and the GSO’s chemical oceanography faculty. As of June 2009, new admissions to this program have been suspended. For program details, please refer to the 2009-2010 URI Catalog.

Chemistry and Forensic Chemistry

The Department of Chemistry offers a Bachelor of Science degree in chemistry and forensic chemistry.

Coordinator: Professor Euler

Students who earn a degree in chemistry and forensic chemistry have a number of potential career opportunities. Most forensic chemists work in government laboratories, typically affiliated with a medical examiner’s office. Students wishing to earn an American Chemical Society accredited degree need to take only CHM 402 and 492 and PHY 205 and 275.

The course sequence given below is the typical curriculum for majors in chemistry and forensic chemistry, but modifications in the timing of upper level courses are acceptable. The degree emphasizes a strong preparation in chemistry supplemented by an introduction to the field of forensic science. In addition to the required courses, students are encouraged to take SOC 230, Crime and Delinquency, to meet one of their social science general education requirements.

A total of 120 credits is required for graduation.

Freshman and sophomore years follow the same program as the B.S. in chemistry (see above).

Junior Year:
First semester: 15 credits
CHM 335 (2), 354 (3), 391 (1), 431 (3), Basic Liberal Studies requirement (3), free elective (3).

Second semester: 17 credits
CHM 392 (3), 412 (3), 414 (2), 432 (3), Basic Liberal Studies requirement (6).

Senior Year:
First semester: 15 credits
CHM 391 (1), 401 (3), 425 (2), 427 (3), free electives (6).

Second semester: 16 credits
CHM 354 (3), 391 (1), 441 (3), free electives (9).

For more information see chm.uri.edu.

Chinese

The Department of Modern and Classical Languages and Literatures offers the Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree with a major in Chinese.

Faculty: Associate Professor He, section head. Assistant Professor Xiong.

Students selecting the Chinese major are required to complete at least 30 credits (maximum 45) in Chinese, not including CHN 101, 102, 111 or equivalent. Students must complete six credits in Chinese literature and civilization, at least three of which must be taken at the 400 level. Students must also complete one additional 400-level Chinese course.

In addition, students must take six credits in Chinese/Asian culture such as Chinese/Asian politics, history, philosophy, arts, etc. offered in English through other departments. Students must choose these six credits from the courses listed below, which can be counted towards the General Education requirement, or from other courses on Chinese culture and civilization as approved by the section head: HIS 171, 374; PHL 331; PSC 116, 377; RLS 131; THE 382.

Students completing the B.A with a major in Chinese simultaneously with the International Engineering Program, the International Business Program, or the Chinese Language Flagship Program may use three credits of Chinese literature towards the Fine Arts and Literature Basic Liberal Studies requirement. In addition, students in these programs are exempt from the one-course-per-discipline rule in Letters, Social Sciences, and Natural Sciences. A total of 120 credits is required for graduation. At least 42 of these must be in courses numbered 300 or above.

Classical Studies

The Department of Modern and Classical Languages and Literatures offers the Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree with a major in classical studies.

Faculty: Professor Carpenter, section head.

Classical Studies Track. Students selecting classical studies as a major must complete a minimum of 30 credits. Twenty-four of the 30 credits must be in Latin and Greek (only six credits of either LAT 101, 102, or GRK 101, 102 may count toward the required 24 credits) as follows: a) a minimum of six credits in each language (12); b) the balance of 12 credits in either or both language(s) (12). The remaining six credits must be from the following: ARH 354; CLA 391, 395, 396, 397; HIS 300, 303; PHL 321 (6).  Other courses may be substituted with permission of the section head.

Certification in secondary education in Latin is available through the Department of Education.

Classical Civilization and Culture Track. Students selecting classical civilization and culture as a major must complete a minimum of 30 credits. Students must complete a Latin sequence through LAT 302 or a Greek sequence through GRK 302 (12 credits). Students must take five courses (15 credits) from the following list of courses: APG 417; ARH 354, 475; CLA 391, 395, 396, 397; ENG 366, 368; GRK 497; HIS 110, 111, 300, 303, 490; PHL 321; LAT 497.  Other courses may be substituted with permission of the section head.  The final requirement (3 credits) is CLA 497, which is the capstone course for the major.

A total of 120 credits is required for graduation. At least 42 of these must be in courses numbered 300 or above.

Only two 100-level courses may count for the major (usually LAT 101, 102 or GRK 101, 102). Courses that may be taken multiple times are CLA 497; GRK 302, 497; LAT 302, 497.

Jump to top 

Communication Studies

Part of the Harrington School of Communication and Media (uri.edu/harrington), the Department of Communication Studies offers the Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree in communication studies.

Faculty: Professor McClure, chairperson. Professors Brownell, Chen, Ketrow, Logan, N. Mundorf, Salazar, Swift, Torrens, and Wood; Associate Professors Derbyshire, DiCioccio, Healey Jamiel, Leatham, Reyes, Roth, Quainoo, and Ye; Assistant Professor Petronio; Lecturers Alfano, August, Bell, Cabral, Fonseca, Greenwood, Monksgaard, Morrison, J. Mundorf, Poulakos, Proulx, R. Smith, Stifano, Waitkun, and Wales; Professors Emeriti Anderson, Devlin, and Doody.

URI’s program in communication studies provides maximum flexibility in planning for a variety of academic and occupational goals. The curriculum is personalized for each student. Although the student will play an important role in curriculum planning, his or her program is closely supervised by the advisor. Departmentally approved courses provide diversity or a more focused approach, depending on the student’s needs and goals. Courses outside the department that relate to the student’s needs and goals are also encouraged.

Students selecting this major may pursue studies in business and professional communication, communication theory, oral interpretation, rhetoric and public address, public relations, radio and TV advertising, and similar career goals.

Students must achieve a minimum grade of B- in COM 100 or COM 110 in order to transfer to the College of Arts and Sciences with a major in Communication Studies. The program requires a minimum of 36 credits (maximum 51) in the major, including COM 202, 221, 381, 382, and 383. The remaining credits will be distributed as follows: at least two courses (6 credits) of COM 200 level; at least two courses (6 credits) of COM 300 level; and at least three courses (9 credits) of COM 400 level. A student must maintain a 2.00 grade point average in her or his major to meet graduation requirements. Courses of independent study (COM 471, 472, 491, 492) and internships do not fulfill the requirements for the major or minor.

A total of 120 credits is required for graduation. At least 42 of these must be in courses numbered 300 or above.

Computer Science

The Department of Computer Science and Statistics offers the Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) and the Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree in computer science. The department also cosponsors the B.S. in computer engineering (described in the College of Engineering section). At the graduate level, the department offers the Master of Science (M.S.) and Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degrees in computer science. The department also offers a Graduate Certificate in Digital Forensics and a Graduate Certificate in Cyber Security.

The department also offers a 24-credit minor in computer science, a minor in cyber security, and a minor in digital forensics.

Faculty: Professor Peckham, chairperson. Professors DiPippo, Fay-Wolfe and Lamagna; Associate Professors Baudet, Hamel, and Hervé; Adjunct Assistant Professors Dickerman, Epstein, Henry, Mello-Stark, and Ravenscroft; Professors Emeriti Carrano and Kowalski; Joint Appointments Assistant Research Professor Alashwal (Pharmacy), Assistant Professor Zhang (CMB/CELS).

Students majoring in computer science who leave URI and are subsequently readmitted must follow the computer science curriculum requirements in effect at the time of their readmission unless an exception is granted by the department chairperson and approved by the dean.

BACHELOR OF ARTS

The B.A. curriculum is designed to provide a solid foundation in the fundamentals of computer science.

In order to transfer from University College for Academic Success to the College of Arts and Sciences as a B.A. computer science major (or to be coded as such in the College of Arts and Sciences), a student must have completed CSC 211, CSC 212, and MTH 141, and must have at least a 2.00 cumulative GPA in all CSC and MTH courses required in the B.A. program that have been completed at the time of the application for transfer.

Students in the B.A. curriculum must complete a minimum of 36 credits (maximum 51) as follows: CSC 106 (4), 110 (4), 211 (4), 212 (4), 301 (4), 305 (4); one of 411 or 412 (4); one programming course from the following: CSC 402, 406, 415, 450, 481; one additional CSC or CSF course at the 300-level or above, except that CSC 392, 491, and 492 may be used only with prior departmental approval. CSC 499 may not be used. Also required are MTH 141 (4) and one more course from the following list: MTH 142, 215, CSC 340, STA 409 (3 or 4); one course from among WRT 104, 106, HPR 112 and one course from WRT 201, 333 (6).

A total of 121 credits is required for graduation; at least 42 of these credits must be at the 300 level or above. A possible course of studies follows.

Freshman Year First semester: 14 credits
CSC 106 (4); WRT 104 (3); URI 101 (1); Basic Liberal Studies (3); Elective (3)

Second semester: 17 credits
CSC 110 (4); MTH 141 (4); Basic Liberal Studies (9)

Sophomore Year First semester: 16 credits
CSC 211 (4); MTH (3); Basic Liberal Studies (3); Electives (6)

Second semester: 16 credits
CSC 212 (4); WRT 333 (3); Basic Liberal Studies (6); Elective (3)

Junior Year First semester: 17 credits
CSC 301 (4), 305 (4); Basic Liberal Studies (3); Electives (6)

Second semester: 14 credits
CSC 412 (4); CSC elective (4); Basic Liberal Studies (3); Elective (3)

Senior Year First semester: 16 credits
CSC/CSF elective (4); Basic Liberal Studies (6); Electives (6)

Second semester: 12 credits
Basic Liberal Studies (3); Electives (9)

 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE

The B.S. curriculum is designed to provide a broad introduction to the fundamentals of computer science including software and systems, programming languages, machine architecture, and theoretical foundations of computing. The required mathematics preparation provides a basis for advanced work. Students will be well prepared for careers or graduate study in computer science.

In order to transfer from University College to Arts and Sciences as a B.S. computer science major (or to be coded as such in the College of Arts and Sciences), a student must have completed CSC 211, CSC 212, MTH 141, and MTH 142 and must have at least a 2.00 cumulative GPA in all CSC and MTH courses required in the B.S. program that have been completed at the time of the application for transfer.

Students in the B.S. curriculum must complete a minimum of 56 credits as follows: CSC 106 (4), 110 (4), 211 (4), 212 (4), 301 (4), 305 (4), 340 (4), 411 (4), 412 (4), 440 (4), 499 (4); one course from CSC 402, 406, 415, 450, 481 (4); and 445 (4); any two additional CSC or CSF courses at the 300-level or above, only one of the two courses may be a CSF course, CSC 392, 491, 492 may be used only with prior departmental approval. CSC 499 may not be used.

Students must also complete MTH 141 (4), 142 (4), and two courses from MTH 215, 243, 244, 322, 362, 382, ISE 432, STA 409, 411, 412 (3 or 4); two courses from PHY 203/273, 204/274, CHM 101/102, 112/114, BIO 101, 102, GEO 103, OCG 123 (8); and one course from WRT 104, 106, HPR 112, and one course from WRT 201, 333 (6).

A total of 124 credits is required for graduation. A possible course of studies follows.

Freshman Year First semester: 14 credits
CSC 106 (4); URI 101 (1); WRT 104 (3); Electives (6).

Second semester: 17 credits
CSC 110 (4); MTH 141 (4), Basic Liberal Studies requirements (9).

Sophomore Year First semester: 17 credits
CSC 211 (4); MTH 142 (3); Natural Science (4), Basic Liberal Studies (3), Elective (3).

Second semester: 17 credits
CSC 212 (4); MTH (3); Natural Science (4); WRT 333 (3), Basic Liberal Studies (3).

Junior Year First semester: 15 credits
CSC 301 (4), 305 (4), CSC/CSF elective (4), MTH (3).

Second semester: 15 credits
CSC 340 (4), 412 (4), CSC elective (4), Basic Liberal Studies (3).

Senior Year First semester: 14 credits
CSC 411 (4), 440 (4), Basic Liberal Studies (3), Electives (3).

Second semester: 16 credits
CSC 499 (4), CSC elective (4), Electives (8).

Minor in Computer Science

Students declaring a minor in computer science must earn 24 credits including CSC 211 (4), 212 (4), 301 (4), and two other CSC courses at the 300-level or above (8). In addition, students are expected to complete MTH 141 (4).

Minor in Digital Forensics

Students declaring a minor in digital forensics must take the following courses: CSF 410 (4), 412 (4), 414 (4), and six credits from HPR 108 (3), CHM 392 (3), PSC 274/SOC 274 (3), PSC 388 (3), CSC 491 (1-3), CSC 499 (1-3).

Minor in Cyber Security

Students declaring a minor in cyber security must take the following courses: CSF 430 (4), CSF 432 (4), CSF (434), and two courses from CSF 410 (4), 524 (4), 536 (4), 538 (4), CSC 417 (4), CSC 418 (4), 541 (4), HPR 108 (3), other faculty approved courses.

International Computer Science Program

The Computer Science Department, under the auspices of the International Engineering Program (IEP) and the Department of Languages, also provides students the opportunity to participate in the International Computer Science Program (ICSP).

Students who complete the five-year program will earn two degrees: a B.S. or B.A. degree in computer science and a B.A. degree in German, French, or Spanish. In addition to computer science courses, students study the language, business, and culture of one or more countries in which the language predominates. Additionally, students will spend six months abroad in a professional internship in a European, Latin American, or Caribbean country, and can extend the stay by completing a semester of course work at a participating university. Upon graduation, students will be well prepared to participate at an international level in computer technology and to compete in the international technological marketplace.

Economics

The Department of Economics offers a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) and a Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree in economics.

Faculty: Professor Bodah, chairperson. Professors Burkett, Lardaro, McIntyre, Mead, Miller, and Ramsay; Assistant Professors Anderson, Molloy, Van Horn, and Yang.

BACHELOR OF ARTS

Students selecting this field must complete a minimum of 30 credits (maximum 48) in economics, including ECN 201 and 202 (6), 305 and 306 (6), 324 or 327 (3), 323 or 328 (3), and 445.

At least 9 credits must be completed from economics courses numbered 300 or above in addition to the core requirements. Students may substitute up to six credits from related courses taught by other departments. These substitutions must be approved by the economics department chairperson and filed with the Office of the Dean. Three of these credits can be from statistics-BUS 210, 212, STA 308, 409, or 412-and do not require departmental approval. Students planning to do graduate work in economics are encouraged to take ECN 375, 376 and at least one semester of statistics.

A total of 120 credits is required for graduation. At least 42 of these must be in courses numbered 300 or above.

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE

Students in this curriculum may elect one of two options, applied economics or economic theory and methods, and must inform the dean’s office of the option.

Applied Economics. A minimum of 31 credits in economics including ECN 201, 202, 305, 327, 328, 375, 376, and 445. In addition, students must complete BUS 212 or MTH 451 or STA 308.

Economic Theory and Methods. A minimum of 31 credits in economics including ECN 201, 202, 305, 327, 328, 376, and 445. In addition, students must complete MTH 141, 142, 215, 243, 307, and 244 or 442 or 435. This option is recommended for students preparing for graduate study in economics.

A total of 120 credits is required for graduation.

English

The Department of English offers a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree. The department also offers the Master of Arts (M.A.) and Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in English.

Faculty: Associate Professor Trimm, chairperson. Professors Cappello, Davis, Gititi, Mandel, Stein, and Walton; Associate Professors Barber, Betensky, Covino, Karno, Rojas, and Williams; Assistant Professors Eron, Faflik, Jones, Sigler, and Valentino; Professors Emeriti Arakelian, Burke, Campbell, Cane, Cuddy, Donnelly, Leo, Neuse, and Swan.

The Major. Students majoring in this field must complete a minimum of 36 credits (maximum 52), 20 of which must be at the 300 level or above. All students must complete ENG 201 (4). The remaining 32 credits must include one course from each of the following five periods (15): pre-1500 (ENG 251, 367, 368, 381, 478); 1500-1660 (ENG 251, 280, 345, 382, 472, 479); 1660-1800 (ENG 241, 251, 345, 374, 377, 480, 482); 19th century (ENG 241, 242, 252, 347, 348, 376, 377, 448, 486); 20th century (ENG 242; ENG/AAF 248; ENG 252, 348; ENG/AAF 362, 363, 364; ENG 317, 378, 379, 383, 387, 485).

Note: Freshmen are not admitted to 300- or 400-level courses without permission of the instructor. Sophomores are discouraged from taking 100-level courses.

A total of 120 credits is required for graduation. At least 42 of these must be in courses numbered 300 or above.

The Minor. Students minoring in English are required to take 20 total English credits, which can be accomplished by taking five 4-credit classes, four of which must be at the 200 level or above.

Film Media

Part of the Harrington School of Communication and Media (uri.edu/harrington), the Film Media Program offers a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree and a minor.

Faculty: Professor Wills, director. Professors Ma, Manteiga, Sama, Swift, Walton, and Wood; Associate Professors De Bruin, Echevarría, Healey- Jamiel, Mandel, Meagher, Moore, and Trimm; Assistant Professors Chadha and Kealhofer-Kemp; Adjunct Professor DeSchepper; Adjunct Assistant Professors Bergstrom, Neugent, Tierney and Zorabedian; Lecturers Brown and Romanow.

The Major. Film media is an interdisciplinary program offering hands-on experience in documentary, experimental, narrative, and new media production, balanced with an emphasis on international cinemas, film/media history, criticism, and theory. Our curriculum reflects the dynamic and diverse nature of this field, approached from a perspective of film history and media theory. Students learn to work with the evolving and overlapping technologies involved in the production of moving images (including film, digital video, 3D animation, game design, and new media), with an understanding of the broadening and globalization of their cultural and aesthetic contexts. A wide range of courses is available to the film media student—courses that examine the historical, theoretical, and global approaches to the analysis and creation of moving images. The film media program prepares students for careers in such areas as independent filmmaking; animation and media design; film and television industries; advertising, marketing, and public relations; and media criticism. Graduates of this program are also prepared to continue with graduate studies, either in film and media production for an M.F.A., or in a master’s or doctoral program in film and media studies.

Students majoring in film media must complete a minimum of 30 credits (maximum 45) in approved courses toward the major. All students must complete the core courses: FLM 101 or 101H, FLM 203 (or ENG 302), FLM 204 (or FLM 205), including the senior-level seminar FLM 495; a minimum of 6 credits from the production and technique category and 6 credits from the critical studies category; a minimum of 6 elective credits in courses that count toward the film major (following). This wide range of choices in film media courses permits students to design a major that will meet both personal and professional goals. Students must have a plan of study approved by an academic advisor in the film media program before beginning their coursework in the major.

Production & Technique: These courses focus on the different approaches to and practices of film/video production—how moving images are created, designed, and used to serve a variety of functions: ART 204, 215, 304, 306, 316; COM 341, 342, 445; FLM 110, 351, 401, 445, 491A; JOR 230, 331.

Critical Studies: These courses emphasize the important traditions of genre and the literary and aesthetic approaches toward understanding and valuing film media, and integrates them into their broad historical, cultural, and ideological contexts: AAF 352; ARH 374, 376, 377; CLS 451; COM 346, 414; ENG 205 D, 245, 300A, 300B, 302, 303, 304, 305D, 352, 451; FLM 203, 204, 205, 352, 444, 451, 491B, 495; FRN 320; GWS 350; HIS 358; HPR 324, 411; ITL 315; JOR 311; PHL 256; SPA 320; THE 182. FRN 320, ITL 315, and SPA 320 are taught in English. Other courses may be used for this category with prior approval of the program director. The following topics courses have been pre-approved:  HPR 324 Images of Masculinity in Films, HPR 324 Rebel Images in Films, HPR 411 Film and Video Practicum, and GWS 350 Women and Film. Other film-based courses may count toward the major or the minor with the permission of the film media program director.

A total of 120 credits is required for graduation. At least 42 of these must be in courses numbered 300 or above.

The Minor. Students who declare a minor in film media must complete 18 credit hours (at least 12 at the 200-level or higher) from those courses currently eligible to count toward the major. Courses in general education may count toward the minor. All courses must be taken for a grade except for the internship (Field Experience). It is strongly suggested that at least one course in the minor be from each of the following two approaches to film and media study:

Production. These courses focus on the practices of film/video/media production, the design and creation of moving images.

Criticism. These courses address critical and theoretical approaches to film media and the broader contexts of international film history, genre, and ideology in which they are situated.

French

The Department of Modern and Classical Languages and Literatures offers the Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree with a major in French.

Faculty: Associate Professor De Bruin, section head. Professors Erickson and Hammadou; Assistant Professor Kemp.

Students selecting this field are required to complete at least 30 credits (maximum 45) in French, not including FRN 101, 102, 391, 392, 393. They must take three credits from FRN 412, 473, or 474. Students must also complete a minimum of three additional FRN credits at the 400 level.

Additionally, students with proven competence in French language and literature, with permission of the advisor, section head, department chairperson, and dean of the college, may take courses toward their concentration in related fields such as history, linguistics, art, or philosophy. Approval must be filed with the Office of the Dean.

Students completing the International Engineering Program or the International Business Program and the B.A. with a major in French simultaneously may use three credits of French literature toward the Fine Arts and Literature Basic Liberal Studies requirement. In addition, students in these programs are exempt from the one-course-per-discipline rule in Letters, Social Sciences, and Natural Sciences.

A total of 120 credits is required for graduation. At least 42 of these must be in courses numbered 300 or above.

Gender and Women’s Studies

This interdepartmental program provides an option for students interested in the interdisciplinary study of the culture and experiences of women and the ways gender affects social, cultural, political, and economic policies and structures locally, nationally, and globally.

Faculty: Associate Professor Lisberger, director. Professors Beauvais, Brownell, Cappello, Danis, Hughes, Ketrow, Luebke, Mederer, Quina, Reynolds, Rollo-Koster, Roworth, M. Schwartz, K. Stein, and Walton; Associate Professors Derbyshire, de los Heros, Ferguson, Karno, Kirchner, Kusz, Lisberger, K. Owens, Pegueros, Rusnock, Sama, and Torrens; Assistant Professor Xu; Part-time Professors Akanji, Brennan, Caronia, Evans, Hagen, Herron, Kosmider, Labelle, Lee, Longa, Macfarlan, Marshall, Murphy, Nichols, Petronio, Pisa, Riley, Rose, Russell, Rutherford, Ryder, Saunders, and Vaccaro; Lecturer Ryder.

The Major. This program leads to a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree in gender and women’s studies.

The program requires 30 credits for a major. Five required courses are GWS 150, 300 or 320 or ITR 301/302, 310 or 325, 315, and 400. Five courses needed to complete the concentration, of which one must be a GWS listing, may be selected from: AAF 290, 355; APG 310, 328; ARH 385; BUS 346; COM 221, 322, 326, 441; CPL 202; ECN 386; ENG 260, 317, 385; GEG 202; GWS 220, 301, 305, 306, 317, 325, 350, 351, 360, 365, 370, 386, 387, 401, 402, 490, 500, 501, 502; HDF 205, 230, 291, 298, 430, 432, 433, 434, 437, 505, 559; HIS 118, 145, 146, 308, 350, 351, 352, 355, 376, 387, 391; KIN 475, 555; NUR 150, 343, 459; NVP 200; PHL 210; PSC 441; PSY 430, 466, 480; SOC 212, 242, 350, 413, 420, 430, 437; TMD 224; and WRT 645. In addition to this list, there are special courses offered by various departments each year that may be selected with prior approval of the Gender and Women’s Studies Advisory Committee, and some additional preapproved topics courses not offered on a regular basis. Students must file a program of study with the dean’s office. The Gender and Women’s Studies Advisory Committee also strongly recommends that majors take an additional 18 credits in a specialized area as a minor.

A total of 120 credits is required for graduation. At least 42 of these must be in courses numbered 300 or above. A GPA of at least 2.00 in the major and overall is required to graduate.

The Minor. Students who declare a minor in gender and women’s studies are required to complete 18 credits including GWS 150 and GWS 315, and three credits from any other GWS course. The remaining nine credits may be selected from any GWS course or from the following: AAF 290, 300C; APG 328; ARH 285; BUS 346; COM 322; ECN 386; ENG 260, 317, 385; HDF 230, 298, 430, 432, 433, 437, 505, 559; HIS 118, 146, 308, 352, 391; KIN 475; NUR 150, 459; PHL 210; PSY 430, 466, 480; SOC 212, 242, 413, 420, 430; TMD 224. There may be additional courses offered by various departments each year that may be selected with prior approval of the Gender and Women’s Studies Advisory Committee. A GPA of at least 2.00 is required.

Post-Baccalaureate Certificate. Please see Gender and Women’s Studies in Graduate Programs.

German

The Department of Modern and Classical Languages and Literatures offers the Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree with a major in German.

Faculty: Associate Professor Rarick, section head. Professor Hedderich; Associate Professor von Reinhart; DAAD Visiting Professor Geithner, Professor Emeritus Grandin, Kirchner.

Students selecting this major complete at least 30 credits (maximum 45) in German, not including GER 101, 102, 111, and 112. Students must complete six credits in literature, at least three of which must be taken at the 400 level, and must complete one additional 400-level German course. Students in the International Engineering Program must complete GER 411.

Students completing the International Engineering Program or the International Business Program and the B.A. with a major in German simultaneously may use three credits of German literature toward the Fine Arts and Literature Basic Liberal Studies requirement. In addition, students in these programs are exempt from the one-course-per-discipline rule in Letters, Social Sciences, and Natural Sciences.

A total of 120 credits is required for graduation. At least 42 of these must be in courses numbered 300 or above.

Hebrew

The Department of Modern and Classical Languages and Literatures offers a number of undergraduate courses in Hebrew.

 

History

The Department of History offers a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree. The department also offers the Master of Arts (M.A.) degree in history.

Faculty: Professor George, chairperson. Professors Honhart, Mather, Rollo-Koster, and Rusnock; Associate Professors Buxton, Ferguson, Pegueros, Sterne, and Widell; Assistant Professors Loomis and Verskin; Lecturers Reumann  and Ward; Associate Research Professor Jensen; Professors Emeriti Cohen, Findlay, Gutchen, Kim, Klein, Schwartz, Strom, Thurston, and Weisbord.

Students selecting this field must complete a minimum of 30 credits (maximum 45) in history, including a minimum of six and a maximum of 12 credits in courses numbered 100 to 299. The balance of required credits is in courses numbered 300 or above, including (1) HIS 401 or 441 or 481 and (2) HIS 495. The two 400-level courses should be taken in consecutive semesters with the same instructor. Under unusual circumstances, with permission of the department chairperson, a student may substitute, in place of the seminar, HIS 391 leading to a substantial research paper. Capstone courses in this major are HIS 401, 441, 481, and 495.

Undergraduates wishing to take courses on the 500 level must secure the permission of the chairperson.

A total of 120 credits is required for graduation. At least 42 of these must be in courses numbered 300 or above.

Italian

The Department of Modern and Classical Languages and Literatures offers the Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree with a major in Italian.

Faculty: Professor Sama, section head. Professor La Luna.

Students selecting this major must complete at least 30 credits (maximum 45), including at least two 400-level courses. ITL 100, 101, and 102 may not be used toward the 30 credits required for the major. Students may use up to three credits from ITL 390 or 395 toward the 30 credits required for the major.

A total of 120 credits is required for graduation. At least 42 of these must be in courses numbered 300 or above.

Japanese

The Department of Modern and Classical Languages and Literatures offers a number of undergraduate courses in Japanese.

Journalism

Part of the Harrington School of Communication and Media (uri.edu/harrington), the Department of Journalism offers the Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree.

Faculty: Assistant Professor Pantalone, chairperson. Associate Professors Martin, Meagher, and Moore; Instructors Abbott, Corey, Cotter, Cyr, Phipps, Plunkett, and Stewart.

The study and practice of journalism require the acquisition and application of a broad base of knowledge, so journalism majors at URI pursue a course of study that is strongly grounded in the liberal arts. Along with general education and elective courses from other disciplines, the major requires students to explore the concepts and professional practices of contemporary journalism in a diverse society. While studying the social, historical, legal, and ethical contexts of journalism, students also learn how to gather, synthesize, and critically assess factual information and communicate it clearly to a variety of audiences in all forms of media. Journalism “skills courses”-through individual and collaborative assignments-focus on reporting, writing, editing, and producing news for all forms of news media: print, broadcast, and multi-media. “Conceptual” courses provide students the intellectual foundation and framework to be responsible journalists. And through its general education course offerings, the Department of Journalism provides non-majors a forum for studying the importance of journalism and the role of the mass media in society.

Students majoring in journalism must complete a minimum of 31 credits (maximum 45) in journalism. All journalism majors must complete JOR 115, 220, 221, 310, 410, and 411. In addition, students must select nine credits from skills courses: JOR 320, 321, 330, 331, 340, 341, 420, 430, 441, 442; and three credits from conceptual courses: JOR 210, 211, 215, 311, 313, 415. Any journalism courses may be chosen for the remaining three credits. Students are encouraged to consult with their advisors about the mix of journalism courses that best meets their goals.

The only journalism courses open to freshmen are JOR 110 (for non-majors), 115 (for majors), and 220. Journalism majors are urged to concentrate on their Basic Liberal Studies (BLS) requirements during their freshman and sophomore years. In addition to these required courses, other BLS courses are recommended as useful for journalism majors. Students should consult with their advisors about complete Basic Liberal Studies requirements and about other courses that meet their individual goals.

Students must earn a grade of C or better in JOR 220 to enroll in the next-level course. Only three credits of JOR 220 may be used to satisfy graduation requirements.

A total of 120 credits is required for graduation. At least 42 of these must be in courses numbered 300 or above.

Journalism majors are transferred from University College for Academic Success to the College of Arts and Science upon completion of JOR 115. They must also complete JOR 220 with a grade of C or better to be transferred.

Latin American Studies

The Departments of Sociology and Anthropology, History, and Modern and Classical Languages and Literatures offer a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree in Latin American Studies (LAS). As of June 2009, new admissions to this program have been suspended. For program details, please refer to the 2009-2010 URI Catalog.

Linguistics

The Department of Modern and Classical Languages and Literatures offers a number of undergraduate courses in linguistics. A minor in linguistics is also available.

Faculty: Contact Professor Hedderich, department head.

Mathematics

The Department of Mathematics offers a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree and a Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree. The department also offers the Master of Science (M.S.) and Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degrees.

For information on URI’s minor in mathematics, see the end of this section.

Faculty: Professor Baglama, chairperson. Professors Beauregard, Eaton, Finizio, Kaskosz, Kulenovic, Merino, and Wu; Associate Professors Bella, Comerford, Medina-Bonifant, and Thoma; Assistant Professors Barrus and Kinnerseley; Professors Emeriti Clark, Datta, Driver, Fraleigh, Grove, Ladas, Lewis, Roxin, Schwartzman, and Verma.

BACHELOR OF ARTS

Students in the B.A. curriculum may tailor a program to suit their individual needs and interests. They should meet with their advisor no later than the end of the first semester of the sophomore year to plan a complete program. This program, and any subsequent changes in it, must be approved by the advisor and the department chairperson. It must contain at least 32 credits (maximum 45) in mathematics, and include MTH 141, 142, 215, 243, 307 and 316, plus 12 or more additional credits in mathematics, at least three credits of which must be at the 400 level.

Credits earned in MTH 101, 105, 106, 107, 108, 109, 110, 111, 208, or 362 cannot be applied toward this degree.

A total of 120 credits is required in the B.A. curriculum. At least 42 of these must be in courses numbered 300 or above.

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE

Students in the B.S. curriculum may elect either the general program or the applied mathematics option. The Office of the Dean must be informed of any substitutions.

General Program. This program stresses basic theories and techniques, and includes an introduction to the principal areas of mathematics. It is recommended for students considering graduate study in mathematics. Students in this program must complete MTH 141, 142, 215, and 243. These courses should normally be taken in the freshman and sophomore years. Students must complete an additional 29 credits in mathematics, including MTH 307, 316, 435/436, and 462.

Applied Mathematics Option. This program is intended for the student who anticipates a career as an applied mathematician or mathematical consultant with an organization such as an industrial or engineering firm or with a research laboratory. The student learns the mathematical ideas and techniques most often encountered in such work. Although a theoretical foundation is developed, the applications are emphasized. The student must take MTH 141, 142, 215, and 243, preferably by the end of the sophomore year. The student must complete an additional 18 credits in mathematics including one of the sequences MTH 435/436 or 437/438, and of the 12 remaining credits in mathematics, at least three credits should be at the 400-level. Also, the student must complete an additional four courses, one of which must be chosen from CSC 200, 201, 211, 212, PHY 410, or CHE 272, and three other courses chosen from Group I (Applications).

Group I: BME 207; BUS 320, 321, 335, 337; CHE 272, 313, 314; CHM 431, 432: CSC 340, 350, 406, 418, 440, 445; ECN 323, 324, 375; ELE 313, 314, 322, 438, 457; ISE 411, 412, 432, 433; MCE 341, 354, 366, 372, 411, 466; OCE 301; PHY 306, 322, 331, 410, 420, 451, 452, 455; STA 409, 412. Other courses may be used for this group with prior permission of the chairperson.

Credits earned in MTH 101, 105, 106, 107, 108, 109, 110, 111, 208, 362, or 420 cannot be applied toward this degree (general program and applied mathematics option).

Both B.S. programs require 120 credits for graduation.

Minor in Mathematics

Students declaring a math minor must earn credit for MTH 141, 142, 215, and 243, and two three-credit math courses chosen from MTH 307, 316, 322, or any 400-level course. At least one of these two courses must be at the 400 level. Substitutions may be made with permission of the chairperson.

Military Science and Leadership (Army ROTC)

The Department of Military Science and Leadership (Army ROTC) is recognized as one of the best leadership programs in the country and is part of the University of Rhode Island curriculum. During classes and field training, students learn first-hand what it takes to lead others and motivate groups, as well as how to organize information to create executable tasks for others to follow. The experience is similar to being a vital manager in a corporation. Students learn to achieve success as team members or leaders in various situations.

Students may participate in the basic program (MSL 101, 102, 201, and 202) without obligation to the United States Army.

Students desiring a minor in Military Science and Leadership may request approval from the dean of the College of Arts and Sciences upon beginning the program. Completion of 18 credits of MSL course work is required to complete the minor.

Contracted cadets receive a monthly allowance ranging from $300 for freshmen to $500 for seniors.

Faculty: Professor Whittemore (Lt. Col., U.S. Army), chairperson. Assistant Professors CPT Richards, MSG Eichner, SFC Rubang, and Mr. Chris Corbett.

Modern and Classical Languages and Literatures

The Department of Modern and Classical Languages and Literatures offers the Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree in Chinese, Classical Studies, French, German, Italian, and Spanish (described in alphabetical order), as well as course work in Arabic, Modern Greek, Hebrew, Japanese, Portuguese, and Russian.

Faculty: Professor Hedderich, chairperson.

Modern Greek

The Department of Modern and Classical Languages and Literatures offers a number of undergraduate courses in Modern Greek.

Music

The Department of Music offers a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree with options in music, music history and literature, and jazz studies, and Bachelor of Music (B.M.) degrees with options in composition, music education, and performance. The department also offers Master of Music (M.M.) degrees in music education or performance (including conducting and composition).

For information on the music minors, see the end of this listing.

Faculty: Professor Parillo, chairperson. Professors Conley, Danis, Kent, Pollart, and Takasawa; Associate Professors Aberdam; Assistant Professor A. Cardany; Lecturers de la Garza, Frazier, and Thomas;  Director of Athletic Bands and Lecturer B. Cardany; Guest Artists/Teachers Berney, Buttery, Ceo, Dennewitz,Hofbauer, Holt, Langfur, Langone, Maxon-Carpenter, McEwan, Mitak, Monllos, Mook, Murray, O’Connor, Phillips, Porter, Raimondi, Sims, Thorne, Volness, Uricco, Wood, and Zinno; Professors Emeriti Abusamra, Ceo, Dempsey, Fuchs, Gibbs, Ladewig, Lee, Livingston, and Rankin; Music Resources and Facilities Coordinator Heroux; Concert Manager Rizzuto, Community Music Coordinator Murray; Accompanists Maxwell and Carroll; Piano Technician Van Dine; Fiscal Clerk Andrews; Senior Word Processing Typist Botello.

BACHELOR OF ARTS

Students selecting music as a major have three options: jazz studies, music, or music history and literature.

Students can be admitted to the B.A. degree program and should contact the Department of Music for specific requirements.  Transfer credits in music theory, music history, and performance must be validated by placement examination.

Jazz Studies. Students selecting this option must complete 43 credits in musicianship and music performance as follows: Musicianship: MUS 119 (1) (fulfills URI 101 requirement), 120 (2), 121 (2), 122 (2), 225 (2), 226 (2), 424 (3), 106 (3), 221 (World Music Unit) (1), 222 (3), 322 (Jazz and Popular Music Units) (2), 280 (0), 480 (1). Music Performance: A: Six semesters of applied music study in the student’s principal area of jazz instrumental performance, (MUS 110W, 210W, and 310W) at 2 credits per semester (12). A successful audition is required prior to study in the principal applied area of jazz instrumental performance. Applied study for the B.A. in music with a jazz option is limited to the following instruments: saxophone, trumpet, trombone, piano, string bass, guitar, and drum set. B: For saxophone, trumpet, and trombone, two semesters of major ensembles MUS 291, 292, 293, 394, 395, and 397. For piano, string bass, guitar, and drum set, two semesters of MUS 396 and 398J in addition to the requirements in section C below (2). C: Two semesters of MUS 391 (2) and three semesters of MUS 396 or 398J (3). At least two of these semesters should be in MUS 396. A successful audition is required prior to participation in jazz ensembles. D: MUS 350 with emphasis on jazz styles (0). E: Seven semesters of MUS 300 (0). Electives: 38 credits, of which a minimum of 30 must be in non-music courses. The department recommends that eight credits of electives be taken in music. At least six of these should be in upper-division music courses. Students who are deficient in keyboard skills must take MUS 171 (1) and 172 (1). MUS 171 and 172 may count as two of the recommended music electives.

A minimum of 120 credits is required for graduation. At least 42 of these credits must be in courses at the 300 level or above.

Music. Students selecting this option must complete 36 credits in musicianship and performance as follows: Musicianship: MUS 119 (1); 120, 121, 122, 225, 226, 227, 228 (14); 221, 222 (6); 322 or upper-division music history course (3); 280 (0) and 480 [capstone] (1). Students who are deficient in keyboard skills must take MUS 171 (1). Performance: four semesters of the principal applied music area, at two credits per semester (8); three semesters of ensembles appropriate to the principal applied music area, MUS 291, 292, 293, 394, 395, 396, 397, or 398G (3); seven semesters of MUS 300 (0). A successful audition is required prior to study in the principal applied music area. Electives: 45 credits, of which a minimum of 30 credits must be in non-music courses. The department strongly recommends that 15 credits of electives be taken in music. At least six of these credits should be in upper-division music courses.

A minimum of 120 credits is required for graduation. At least 42 of these must be at the 300 level or above.

Music History and Literature. Students choosing this option must complete 43 credits in musicianship and performance, as follows: Musicianship: MUS 119 (1); 120, 121, 122, 225, 226, 227, 228 (14); 221, 222, 322 (9); three upper-division music history courses (9); 280 (0) and 480 [capstone] (1). Students who are deficient in keyboard skills must take MUS 171 (1). Performance: four semesters of the principal applied music area, at two credits for two semesters and one credit for two semesters (6); three semesters of major ensembles appropriate to the principal applied music area MUS 291, 292, 293, 394, 395, 396, 397, or 398G (3); seven semesters of MUS 300 (0). A successful audition is required prior to study in the principal applied music area. Electives: 38 credits, of which a minimum of 30 must be in non-music courses. The department strongly recommends that eight credits of electives be taken in music. At least six of these credits should be in upper-division music courses. Other: nine credits of foreign language and proficiency through 103.

A minimum of 120 credits is required for graduation. At least 42 of these must be in courses numbered 300 or above.

BACHELOR OF MUSIC

Students selecting the Bachelor of Music degree program have three options: music composition, music education, or music performance.

Students can be admitted to the B.M. degree program only after a successful audition in the principal applied music area and should contact the Department of Music for specific requirements. Transfer credits in music theory, music history, and performance must be validated by placement examination.

All Bachelor of Music students must successfully complete Option I or Option II of the piano proficiency requirement. In Option I, students must pass all seven piano proficiencies by the end of their junior year. Piano proficiency examinations before the faculty examination committee are scheduled on a regular basis during the fall and spring semesters. In Option II students take MUS 171, 172, 271, and 272 and successfully pass each course with a grade no lower than a C. Failure to pass either option will require re-examination in succeeding semesters. The B.M. degree will not be granted until this requirement is fulfilled.

Students selecting Option I will need to demonstrate the following seven piano proficiencies by the end of their junior year: 1) Five-finger patterns, playing a vocal warm-up sequence, hands together; 2) scales, playing two-octave major scales up to three sharps and flats, and one-octave minor scales in all three forms up to three sharps and flats, hands together, by memory at a tempo of M.M.=144 per note; 3) transposition, transposing at sight two melodies selected by the examination committee, students will be asked to transpose the melodies up or down by either a half step or whole step; 4) harmonization, reading two melodies taken from any major or minor key chosen by the examination committee, improvising suitable accompaniments for the melodies by using diatonic triads and secondary dominants, and reading from chord symbols; 5) patriotic songs, playing America and The Star-Spangled Banner in a manner suitable for accompanying community or school singing; these accompaniments are to be prepared in advance; 6) sight-reading, playing at sight selections chosen from a simple accompaniment part and/or beginning-level solo scores; and 7) repertoire, playing two prepared piano pieces by contrasting composers; each piece must be approved in advance by a member of the piano faculty or an instructor of class piano.

No student should participate in more than three major ensembles in a single semester.

In addition, students select one of the following options:

Music Composition. Students selecting the music composition option must complete seven semesters of applied composition (MUS 110V, 210V, 310V, 410V), one or two credits per semester (10); seven semesters of the principal applied music area, two credits per semester (14); seven semesters of MUS 300 (0); and four semesters of secondary applied music areas, one credit per semester (4); MUS 171 and 172 are required as secondary applied music areas if students select piano proficiency option II. Students who have not passed the piano proficiency examination by the end of MUS 172 will be expected to take MUS 271 and 272, which can count as secondary applied music areas. Other secondary applied credits as needed must come from MUS 110-410 (in an applied area other than the principal applied music area) or MUS 169, 170, 173, 175, 177, or 179. Also required are six semesters of major ensembles MUS 292, 293, 394, 395, or 397 appropriate to the principal applied music area (6). For the studio composition specialization, credits in MUS 396 may be included. Also required are MUS 119 (1); MUS 120, 121,122, 225, 226, 227, 228, 416 (17); 221, 222, 322 (9); 235 (2) and 311 (2); 417, 420, and 421 (9) (for students wishing to specialize in studio composition, three credits of MUS 424 may be substituted for MUS 420); an upper-division music history course (3); MUS 450 Senior Composition Recital [capstone] (0); MUS 280 (0) and 480 [capstone] (2); and six credits of electives, at least three of which should be in upper-division music courses.

A minimum of 124 credits is required for graduation.

Music Education. See “Teacher Education Programs” in Preprofessional Preparation and “Admission Requirements” in Education for admission requirements for teacher education programs. Completing all requirements in the music education option leads to an initial teaching certificate for music in grades K-12. Students selecting this option must complete 89 credits in Studies in Music and Professional Education, as follows:

Studies in Music (64 credits): seven semesters of the principal applied music area (instrument or voice must be selected from MUS 110-410 A-U only; applied study in jazz as the principal applied music area is not acceptable for the music education option), two credits per semester (14). Seven semesters of MUS 300 (0); senior recital MUS 450 [capstone] (0). Four semesters of secondary applied music areas, one credit per semester (4); MUS 171 and 172 are required as secondary applied music areas if students select piano proficiency option II. Students who have not passed the piano proficiency exam by the end of MUS 172 will be expected to take MUS 271 and 272, which can count as secondary applied music areas. Other secondary applied credits as needed must come from MUS 110-410 (in an applied area other than the principal applied music area). Seven semesters of major ensembles appropriate to the principal applied music area, at 0-1 credit per semester (6). Major ensembles include MUS 292, 293, 394, 395, and 397; no more than two semesters of MUS 291 and/or 396 can count toward the major ensemble requirement. MUS 119 (1); 120, 121, 122, 225, 226, 227, 228 (14); 416 or 417 (3); 221, 222, 322 (9). MUS 169, 170, 173, 175, 177, 179 at a minimum of one credit each (6); 235 (2); 311, 312 (5).

Professional Education (25 credits): Students pursuing the music education option must apply for admission to the Office of Teacher Education in the School of Education; see Teacher Education Programs and “Admission Requirements” in Education for admission requirements. MUS 280 (0), 480 [capstone] (2); MUS 238, 339, 340, 341 (10); EDC 250 (1), 484 (12). PSY 113 (3) is required as a Professional Education course but also counts toward the Social Science requirement in the Basic Liberal Studies program. The piano proficiency examination Options I or II, the Praxis II: Principles of Learning and Praxis II: Music Content Knowledge, and all courses required for the music education option, with the exception of MUS 480 [capstone], must be successfully completed before supervised student teaching (EDC 484). Students may wish to enroll in EDC 312 (3) in order to prepare for the Praxis II: Principles of Learning.

A minimum of 128 credits is required for graduation.

Music Performance. All students in the music performance option must take the following music courses: eight semesters of MUS 300 (0); MUS 350 (0) and 450 [capstone] (0); MUS 119 (1); 120, 121, 122, 225, 226, 227, 228, 416 (17); 221, 222, 322 (9). MUS 235 (2) and 442 (2); 311 (2); 280 (0); 480 [capstone] (2). Students in the jazz option must take MUS 424 in place of MUS 416. Jazz option students must also take MUS 106 (3).

A minimum of 124 credits is required for graduation. In addition, students must select one of the following five sub-options:

Classical Guitar: eight semesters of the principal applied music area. Two semesters of MUS 110T at two credits in the first semester and three credits in the second (5); two semesters of MUS 210T at three credits each (6); two semesters of 310T and 410T at four credits each (16). MUS 171 and 172 (2). Students who have not passed the piano proficiency examination by the end of MUS 172 will be expected to take MUS 271 and 272. Four semesters of major ensembles MUS 292, 293, 394, 395, 396, or 397 (4). Four semesters of guitar ensemble (MUS 398G) and three semesters of playing guitar in chamber music ensembles (MUS 398) (7). An upper-division music history course (3); an upper-division music theory course (3). Four credits of electives, at least three of which should be in upper-division music courses.

Jazz (limited to saxophone, trumpet, trombone, piano, guitar, string bass, and drum set): eight semesters of the principal jazz applied music area. Two semesters of MUS 110W at two credits in the first semester and three credits in the second (5); two semesters of MUS 210W at 3 credits each (6); two semesters of 310W and 410W at four credits each (16). MUS 171 and 172 (2). Students who have not passed the piano proficiency examination by the end of MUS 172 will be expected to take MUS 271 and 272. Two semesters of major ensembles MUS 291, 292, 293, 394, 395, or 397 (4). Two semesters of jazz studio ensemble (MUS 396), two semesters of jazz studio lab (MUS 391), and four semesters of chamber music ensembles/jazz (MUS 398J) (8). An upper-division music history course or an upper-division music theory course (3). Three credits of electives which should be in upper-division music courses.

Orchestral Instrument: eight semesters of the principal applied music area. Two semesters of MUS 110 at two credits in the first semester and three credits in the second (5); two semesters of MUS 210 at three credits each (6); two semesters of 310 and 410 at four credits each (16). MUS 171 and 172 (2). Students who have not passed the piano proficiency examination by the end of MUS 172 will be expected to take MUS 271 and 272. Eight semesters of major ensembles MUS 292, 394, or 397 (8). Three semesters of secondary or chamber music ensembles (3). An upper-division music history course (3); an upper-division music theory course (3). Four credits of electives, at least three of which should be in upper-division music courses.

Piano or Organ: eight semesters of the principal applied music area. Two semesters of MUS 110B or C and 210B or C at three credits each (12); two semesters of 310B or C and 410B or C at four credits each (16). All students pursuing this sub-option must pass the piano proficiency examination by the end of the second semester of the junior year. Keyboard majors can waive MUS 171, 172, 271, and 272, courses normally taken to develop the skills necessary to pass the piano proficiency examination. Four semesters of major ensembles MUS 292, 293, 394, 395, or 397 (4). Six semesters of piano accompanying (MUS 371) or playing piano in chamber music ensembles (MUS 398) (6). MUS 420 (3). An upper-division music history course (3). Six credits of electives, at least three of which should be in upper-division music courses.

Voice: eight semesters of the principal applied music area. Two semesters of MUS 110A at two credits in the first semester and three credits in the second (5); two semesters of MUS 210A at three credits each (6); two semesters of 310A and 410A at four credits each (16). MUS 171, 172, 271, and 272 (4). Eight semesters of major ensembles MUS 293 or 395 at zero or one credit per semester (7). Two semesters of chamber or other music ensembles (2). MUS 283 (3). Four credits of electives, at least three of which should be in upper-division music courses.

Students selecting voice must also take nine credits of foreign language in two or more languages. This requirement may be modified or satisfied by advanced placement.

Minors in Music

Jazz Studies. Students who wish to declare a minor in music using the jazz studies option must complete 19 credits in musicianship, performance, and electives as follows: Musicianship: MUS 106 (3), 120 (2), 121 (2), 122 (2), 171 (1), 221 (World Music Unit) (1), 322 (Jazz and Popular Music Units) (2), and MUS 300 for a minimum of two semesters (0). Music Performance: a minimum of four credits in the principal applied music area (MUS 110W, 210W, at one or two credits per semester) (4), and two semesters of MUS 391, 396, or 398J (2). Applied study in MUS 110W and 210W for the minor in jazz option is limited to the following instruments: saxophone, trumpet, trombone, piano, bass, guitar, and drum set. Electives: The department strongly suggests that 3 credits be taken in MUS 101. Participation in other major ensembles is also encouraged. Major ensembles include MUS 291, 292, 293, 394, 395, 397, and 398G, pending audition. A successful audition is required prior to study in the principal applied music area and prior to participation in ensembles.

Music. This option gives students a broad-based background in music. Course work in this option is similar to that taken by students starting work toward a B.A. or B.M. degree in music. Students who wish to declare a minor in music using the music minor option must earn credit for MUS 111 (3) or 120 (2); 171 (1), 121 and 122 (4), 300 for a minimum of two semesters (0), and two 3-credit music history and literature courses selected from MUS 221, 322, 408, 430, 431, 433, 434 (or 222, if the student has the additional pre-requisites) (6). Additionally, students must earn a minimum of four credits in their principal applied music area (MUS 110-410, at one or two credits per semester) and four credits in major ensembles* appropriate to the principal applied music area (8). The minimum number of credits required for this option is 21-22. Students must pass an audition in their principal applied music area prior to registration for applied study in voice or on an instrument.

Music Performance. This option gives students the opportunity for a more concentrated study in voice or on an instrument. Students who wish to declare a minor in music using the music performance minor option must earn credit for MUS 111 (3) or 120 (2); MUS 121 and 122 or a music history course selected from MUS 101, 106, 221, 322, 408, 430, 431, 433, 434 (3-4); MUS 300 for a minimum of two semesters (0). Additionally, students must earn a minimum of eight credits in their principal applied music area (MUS 110-410 at one or two credits per semester) and six credits in major ensembles* appropriate to the principal applied music area (14). The minimum number of credits required for this option is 19-21. Students must pass an audition in their principal applied music area prior to registration for applied study in voice or on an instrument.

Music Voice Performance for Theatre Majors. The purpose of this option is to give students who are theatre majors the opportunity for more concentrated and focused study in voice and other areas of music. Theatre students who wish to declare this minor must earn credit for MUS 111 (3) or 120 (2) and 121 (2); a music history course selected from MUS 101, 106, 221, 322, 408, 430, 431, 433, 434 (3); MUS 300 for one semester (1). Additionally, students must earn a minimum of eight credits in voice over four semesters (MUS 110A (2), 110A (2), 210A (2), 210A (2)), and three semesters in MUS 395 (audition required), MUS 293 (1), or MUS 485 (1), with MUS 485 being limited to one semester. Students must pass an audition in voice prior to registration for applied study in voice. The minimum number of credits required for this option is 18.

Individual Music. This option gives students more flexibility. These students design and develop their music minor program under the advisement and sponsorship of a full-time music faculty member. Petitions outlining and justifying the desired music minor program must be presented by the faculty sponsor to the music faculty for approval. A minimum of 18 credits is required. Petitions should be submitted as early as possible in a student’s undergraduate program.

*Music ensembles include MUS 291, 292, 293, 394, 395, 396, and 397. Up to one semester of MUS 291 can count toward the major ensemble requirement in the music minor option; up to two semesters of MUS 291 can count toward the major ensemble requirement in the music performance option. Those with a major applied area in guitar can count MUS 398G for guitar ensemble as a major ensemble. Those with a major applied area in piano can count additional applied music credits (MUS 110-410) and/or accompanying (MUS 371) in lieu of the major ensemble requirements.

Philosophy

The Department of Philosophy offers a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree.

Faculty: Professor Johnson, chairperson. Professors Foster, J. Peterson, and Wenisch; Associate Professors Meghani and Mollgaard; Assistant Professors Krieger and Jomaa (joint appointment with PSC); Professors Emeriti Y. Kim, Schwarz, and Zeyl.

Students selecting this major must complete no fewer than 33 credits (maximum 48) in philosophy. Students are required to take PHL 205; at least one from PHL 101, 451 (logic); at least one from PHL 212, 314 (ethics); at least one from PHL 341, 342, 452; both PHL 321 and 323; at least one from PHL 204, 318, 324, 346; and PHL 490 [capstone]. The remaining nine credits may be chosen freely from the list of PHL courses offered by the department. At least 18 credits in course work must be at the 300 level or above.

A total of 120 credits is required for graduation. At least 42 of these must be in courses numbered 300 or above.

Physics

The Department of Physics offers a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree for students already registered and a Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree. The department also offers the Master of Science (M.S.) and Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degrees.

Faculty: Associate Professor Andreev, chairperson. Professors Heskett, Kahn, Kaufman, Malik, Meyerovich, Muller, Nightingale, and Steyerl; Associate Professors Andreev and Reshetnyak; Adjunct Professor McCorkle; Adjunct Associate Professors Bozyan, Karbach, and Ruffa; Professors Emeriti Desjardins, Hartt, Letcher, Nunes, Penhallow, Pickart, and Willis.

BACHELOR OF ARTS

As of June 2009, new admissions to this program have been suspended. For program details, please refer to the 2009-2010 URI Catalog.

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE

This curriculum provides a general background in both theoretical and experimental physics. It forms a foundation for further study at the graduate level toward an advanced degree, and also prepares the student for a career as a professional physicist in industry, education, or government. Initiative, independent solution of laboratory problems, and research are encouraged in the advanced laboratory courses.

The following courses are required for the B.S., but exceptions and/or substitutions are possible and can be arranged by consulting the department chairperson.

A total of 120 credits is required for graduation. PHY 483 and 484 are the capstone courses in this program.

Freshman Year First semester: 14 credits
MTH 141 (4); PHY 203/273 (4), Basic Liberal Studies requirements and electives (6).

Second semester: 16 credits
MTH 142 (4); PHY 204/274 (4), Basic Liberal Studies requirements and electives (8).

Sophomore Year First semester: 17 credits
CSC 211 (4); MTH 243 (3); PHY 205/275 (4), Basic Liberal Studies requirements and electives (6).

Second semester: 14 credits
MTH 244 (3); PHY 306 (3), 410 (3), Basic Liberal Studies requirements and electives (5).

Junior Year First semester: 14 credits
PHY 322 (3), 381 (3); MTH 215 (3), Basic Liberal Studies requirements and electives (5).

Second semester: 17 credits
Mathematics elective at the 300 or 400 level (3), PHY 331 (3), 382 (3), Basic Liberal Studies requirements and electives (8).

Senior Year First semester: 13 credits
PHY 401 (1), 420 (3), 451 (3), 483 (3), Basic Liberal Studies requirements and electives (3).

Second semester: 15 credits
PHY 452 (3), 455 (3), 484 (3), 510 (3), Basic Liberal Studies requirements and electives (3).

Medical Physics Track: Five-Year Program leading to a B.S. in Physics and an M.S. in Medical Physics.

The field of medicine is facing a significant shortage of well-trained and qualified clinical medical physicists, due to the increasing use of complex technology in the field of radiation oncology and medical imaging. Consequently there is a growing demand for the training of professionals in medical physics. Only specially created programs can accomplish this mission, since among other things medical physics requires a multidisciplinary effort.

This degree program provides students with rigorous training in essential undergraduate and graduate physics courses, as well as in medical physics courses. Students are introduced to both research and clinical aspects of modern medical physics through the Rhode Island Hospital state-of-the-art medical imaging and therapy facilities. The program is based on the B.S. and M.S. programs in physics with the introduction of additional courses in photo medicine, nanotechnology, radiation physics and dosimetry, radiation oncology, radio-biology, and a clinical practicum. These courses are taught by the URI Physics Department, the Rhode Island Hospital-Brown University Medical School Faculty, and the staff at the RI Nuclear Science Center at the Bay Campus.

Matriculation in this program requires that the student apply and be accepted; it is not automatic. It is possible that a student will enter the program having taken some of the courses but not all. It is mandatory that the student take all of the courses (or show credit in them) in order to graduate. The schedule outlined below demonstrates that it is possible to get both degrees in five years. Where we have written two courses separated by an “or” (e.g., PHY 322 or 420) the student is to take whichever course is offered that semester. The student must have credit in both courses, however, at the end of the curriculum.)

Freshman Year First semester:
BIO 121 + lab; MTH 141; PHY 203H, 273H; URI 101; one 3-credit Basic Liberal Studies course.

Second semester:
BIO 242, 244; CHM 101, 102; MTH 142; PHY 204H, 274H; one 3-credit Basic Liberal Studies course.

Sophomore Year First semester:
CSC 211; MTH 243; PHY 205H, 275H, 210; 6 credits of Basic Liberal Studies courses.

Second semester:
MTH 244; PHY 306, 410; 9 credits of Basic Liberal Studies courses.

Junior Year First semester:
MTH 215; PHY 381, 451, 322 or 420; 6 credits of Basic Liberal Studies courses.

(In the beginning of the sixth semester, the student can begin the application process to be admitted to graduate school. This is necessary only if the student is planning on getting both the master’s and bachelor’s degrees after five years. The application will be evaluated by a committee of faculty formed for that purpose, and it will be the sole determiner of who goes on in that year. At that time it will still be possible to get a simple B.S. in physics in the standard four years.)

Second semester:
PHY 331, 382, 455, 540 or 545; 6 credits of Basic Liberal Studies courses.

Senior Year First semester:
PHY 322 or 420, 550 or 552, 560 or 565, 510 or 610; ELE 564, 565.

Second semester:
PHY 402, 452 or 570, 540 or 545; ELE 562, 563; STA 307.

Fifth Year First semester:
PHY 483, 550 or 552, 560 or 565, 510 or 610.

Fifth Year Second semester:
PHY 484, 555, 691; SOC 224.

Near the end of the final semester, students also take a final exam which is similar to the ABR Part 1 exam they are expected to take to get into a CAMPEP accredited residency program.

Physics and Physical Oceanography

The Department of Physics and the Graduate School of Oceanography offer a Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree in physics and physical oceanography.

Coordinators: Professors Heskett and Muller (Physics). The faculty consists of the members of the Department of Physics and the GSO’s physical oceanography faculty.

This program includes a comprehensive background in physics and a solid introduction to physical oceanography. The curriculum includes a full set of physics and mathematics courses required for a B.S. in physics, with extra emphasis on classical physics, plus additional upper-division or graduate-level courses in fluid dynamics and physical oceanography.

The senior physics research project (PHY 483 and 484) will be undertaken in the Graduate School of Oceanography under the supervision of a GSO faculty member. In addition, students may find summer employment or participate in oceanographic research cruises after their junior year.

Students graduating in this course of study are well prepared to pursue careers in conventional physics or physical oceanography. Technical positions in private or government oceanographic research laboratories are available for physical oceanographers at the B.S. level. Students who continue on to graduate studies should expect to find high demand for physical oceanographers with advanced degrees. It is recommended that students planning to attend an oceanography graduate school take PHY 520 (Classical Dynamics); students wishing to keep open the option of physics at the graduate level should take PHY 452 (Quantum Mechanics). Students entering the URI Graduate School of Oceanography from this program will have a significant head start compared to those entering from most other undergraduate institutions.

A total of 129 credits is required for graduation.

Freshman Year First semester: 17 credits
MTH 141 (4); OCG 110 (3); PHY 203, 273 (4), Basic Liberal Studies requirements and electives (6).

Second semester: 16 credits
CHM 101, 102 (4); MTH 142 (4); OCG 123 (4); PHY 204, 274 (4).

Sophomore Year First semester: 17 credits
CSC 211 (4); MTH 243 (3); PHY 205, 275 (4), Basic Liberal Studies requirements and electives (6).

Second semester: 17 credits
MTH 244 (3); PHY 306 (3); 410 (3), Basic Liberal Studies requirements and electives (8).

Junior Year First semester: 17 credits
PHY 322 (3), 381 (3); MTH 215 (3), Basic Liberal Studies requirements and electives (8).

Second semester: 17 credits
MCE 354 (3); PHY 331 (3), 382 (3), Basic Liberal Studies requirements and electives (8).

Senior Year First semester: 16 credits
OCG 501 (3); PHY 401 (1), 420 (3), 451 (3), 483 (3), Basic Liberal Studies requirements and electives (3).

Second semester: 12 credits
OCG 510 (3); PHY 425 (3), 484 (3), and 510 (3).

Political Science

The Department of Political Science offers the Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree. The department also offers the Master of Arts (M.A.) in political science and the Master of Public Administration (M.P.A.).

Faculty: Professor Krueger, chairperson. Professors Hennessey, Moakley, Petro, and Rothstein; Associate Professor; Assistant Professors Hutchison, Johnson, Pearson-Merkowitz, and Xu; Professors Emeriti Hamilton, Killilea, Leduc, Stein, Tyler, Wood, and Zucker.

The Major. Students selecting this field must complete a minimum of 32 credits (maximum 48) in political science, including PSC 113 (4), 116 (4), 212 or 310 (4), and either 210 or 211 (4). Student must select one 300-level experiential course (4) and two 400-level research seminars (4 each).

Students completing both the B.A. degree in political science and the B.S. degree in engineering at the same time may use courses in the political science major to satisfy Basic Liberal Studies requirements for the Bachelor of Arts. The College of Engineering and the Department of Political Science have established a curriculum that allows for the completion of the two degrees and a public-sector internship in five years.

A total of 120 credits is required for graduation. At least 42 of these must be in courses numbered 300 or above.

The Minor. Students declaring a minor in political science must earn 20 credits includng PSC 113 (4), 116 (4), either 210 or 211 (4), and any two other political science courses at the 300 level or above.

Minor in International Relations. See Interdepartmental Minors.

John Hazen White Sr. Center for Ethics and Public Service. An important part of URI’s Political Science Department, this center was established in 1994 through a grant from John Hazen White Sr., a local businessman and philanthropist. The center offers ethics and public service programs for undergraduate and graduate students, elected and appointed officials, public managers, and citizen groups. In addition to research opportunities, workshops, and special programs, the center also sponsors the Mentor/Tutor Internship (MTI), which provides URI students internships, for credit, in local public schools to encourage and mentor students at risk of dropping out. Contact the department office for more information.

Portuguese

The Department of Modern and Classical Languages and Literatures offers a number of undergraduate courses in Portuguese.

Psychology

The Department of Psychology offers a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree and a Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree. The department also offers the Master of Science Degree in School Psychology (M.S.) and provides three doctoral programs in Behavioral Science, Clinical Psychology, and School Psychology (Ph.D. degrees).

Faculty: Professor Collyer, chairperson. Professors Boatright-Horowitz, Brady, Bueno de Mesquita, J.L. Cohen, Faust, Florin, Gorman, Harlow, Laforge, Morokoff, Prochaska, Quina, Rogers, Rossi, L. Stein, Stoner, Velicer, Weyandt, Willis, and Wood; Associate Professors Flannery-Schroeder, S. Harris, Robbins, and Walls; Assistant Professor Loftus; J. Mena; Professors Emeriti Biller, Grebstein, Gross, A. Lott, B. Lott, Merenda, Silverstein, N. Smith, Stevenson, Valentino, and Vosburgh.

The Major

BACHELOR OF ARTS

The B.A. degree in Psychology provides students with a solid academic preparation through an overview of the current areas in the field of Psychology.  Student gain a better understanding of human behavior and an enhanced awareness of themselves and society, as well as skills for analyzing and evaluating information and data. Students in this program must complete a minimum of 32 credits (maximum 47) in Psychology.

In order to transfer from University College for Academic Success to Arts and Sciences as a psychology major (or to be coded as such in the College of Arts and Sciences), a student must have a C or better in PSY 113; a C average in two of the following courses: PSY 232, 235, and 254; and a C in PSY 200 (300).

Psychology majors are required to complete a minimum of 32 (maximum 47) credits in psychology courses to be distributed as follows: PSY 113 (with a grade of C or better); a minimum of two courses from PSY 232, 235, and 254 (with a C average); both PSY 200 (300) and PSY 301 (with a grade of C or better in each); a minimum of three topics courses (9 credits) from PSY 255, 310, 335, 361, 381, 384, 385, 399, 425, 432, 434, 436, 442, 460, 464, 479, and 480 (the average in the three courses must be C or better); a minimum of one course (3 credits) in the applied knowledge area to be selected from PSY 103, 261, 275, 334, 399, 465, 466, 471, and 478 (with a C or better); a minimum of one course (at least three credits) from the experiential practice and/or internships area selected from PSY 305, 473, 488, 489, 499; EDC 484; ITR 301, 302; CSV 302, with a C or better in graded courses or a satisfactory in S/U courses. A minimum of 32 graded psychology (PSY) credits (not S/U) are required for the psychology major. Once 47 credits in psychology courses are taken, additional psychology credits will not count toward the 120 total credits required for graduation.  Students pursuing the B.A. degree must complete 42 of the 120 credits required for graduation at the 300-level or higher.

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE

The B.S. degree in Psychology requires additional credits in natural science and mathematics, more of a focus on research and statistics, and an area of specialization to more adequately prepare students for advanced work in graduate school.  Students in this degree program must complete a minimium of 37 credits in Psychology (maximum of 52).  In order to transfer from University College for Academic Success, a student must have completed PSY 113, PSY 232, and PSY 200 with grades of C or better.

The general education requirements are the same as those for the B.A. degree with three modifications: students must take two math classes instead of one (choosing from the following: MTH 107 or STA 220 (not both), MTH 111, 131, 132, 141, 142, or 215); students must take a research writing class (WRT 106 or 333), and must take BIO 101 or 105 for one of the Natural Science courses.  For the foreign language, letters, fine arts, and literature general education courses, students should follow the requirements for the College of Arts and Sciences B.A. degree.

In the area of research methods, students must take PSY 200, PSY 301, PSY 434, and a special section of STA 412 offered for Psychology majors.  They must also take PSY 489 to gain research experience.  A minimum grade of C is required for the research methods and research experience courses.  In addition, students must choose at least three courses from a selected focus area.  Child Psychology/School Psychology Focus: PSY 432, 442 466, 471, 479 (Introduction to School Psychology); PSY/SOC 430.  Cognitive/Neuroscience Focus: PSY 384, 361, 385, 432 (cognitive topic), 479 (cognitive topic).  Health/Clinical Psychology Focus: (note that two of the three courses must be at the 300+ level) PSY 254, 255, 275, 334, 335, 436, 460, 479 (Health Promotion Topic).  Social/Multicultural Psychology Focus: PSY 335, 399, 425, 470, 480.  For the courses in the focus area, a minimum of a C average is required.  Students also must take Physiological Psychology (PSY 381) and one course from a focus area other than the main focus area selected by the student.  A minimum of a C average is required for these two courses as well.  Overall, a grade point average of 2.5 is required for all Psychology courses.

For either degree option, students who must repeat a course to meet the minimum grade requirements may use only three credits of that particular course toward graduation.

Students majoring in psychology typically go on either to pursue a career at the B.A. level or study for an advanced degree. In both cases, students should consult the department’s Web site (uri.edu/artsci/psy) and their academic advisor to select the appropriate degree option and the appropriate courses for their interests and goals.

For either the B.A. or the B.S., a total of 120 credits is required for graduation.

The Minor. The minor in psychology requires completion of 18 or more credits in psychology courses. These credits must include PSY 113. Only three credits in experiential courses for letter grades (i.e. PSY 305, 473, 488, or 489) may count towards the minor. The quality point average in psychology courses must be at least 2.00 or above. At least 12 of the 18 credits (three courses) must be taken at URI. General Education credits may be used for the minor, but no course may be used for both the major and minor field of study. Courses for the minor cannot be taken pass/fail or S/U.

Public Relations

Part of the Harrington School of Communication and Media (uri.edu/harrington), the Departments of Communication Studies offers the Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree in public relations.

Contact: Regina A. Bell, MA, Public Relations, (401) 874-2587.

This interdepartmental major combines a liberal arts education with the skills important to a career in public relations. Working with the public relations advisor, students will develop a specific program of studies.

Students must complete the following courses before being accepted into the major: PRS 100: Intro to Public Relations and COM 202: Public Speaking. Students apply to the public relations program in February of each year.  The major requires an overall GPA of 2.50 and a 2.50 GPA in the pre-major courses. Exception: discretion of the chairperson of Communication Studies.

The major requires 39 credits: two pre-major courses (PRS 100, COM 202); students enroll in the following courses once accepted to the major- PRS 320, 340, 441, 491; COM 381; WRT 331 (prerequisite of a 200-level WRT course), and JOR 341 (21). Students must complete four courses (12 credits) from the following including at least one course from each category—Category A: JOR 321, WRT 201, 235, 302, 303, 304, 333; Category B: BUS 365, 465, 468; Category C: COM 302, 351, 415, 450; Category D: COM 415; JOR 410, 442; PRS 200, 300, 442; PSY 335. A student must maintain a 2.00 grade point average in her or his major to meet graduation requirements.

A total of 120 credits is required for graduation. At least 42 of these must be at the 300 level or above.

A minor is also available (see Interdepartmental Minors).

Russian

The Department of Modern and Classical Languages and Literatures offers a number of undergraduate courses in Russian.

Sociology

The Department of Sociology and Anthropology offers the Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree and the Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree in sociology.

Faculty: Professor Carroll, chairperson. Professors Cunnigen and Mederer; Associate Professors Costello, Doerner and Van Wyk; Assistant Professor Zozula; Lecturers Bibeau and Pisa; Professor Emerita Reilly.

BACHELOR OF ARTS

Students selecting this curriculum must complete a minimum of 30 credits (maximum 45) in sociology, including SOC 100, 301, 401, 495 [capstone], and two courses selected from SOC 240, 242, 336, 413, 428, and 452. At least 18 of the 30 credits must be at the 300 level or above. No more than six credits in independent study and/or field experience courses may be used toward the 30 credits required for the major. SOC 495 is to be taken during the senior year. (See the description of the anthropology major.)

A total of 120 credits is required for graduation. At least 42 of these must be in courses numbered 300 or above.

In order to transfer into the sociology B.A. program from University College for Academic Success, a student must have completed at least 24 credits and have earned a minimum of a 2.00 GPA.

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE

Students in this curriculum elect either the Criminology and Criminal Justice option or the Organizational Analysis option and must notify the dean’s office of the chosen option.

SOC 476 is the capstone course for the Criminology and Criminal Justice option. SOC 495 is the capstone course for the Organizational Analysis option.

Criminology and Criminal Justice Option. A minimum of 30 credits in sociology is required including SOC 100, 230, 274, 301, 370, and 476 (18); two courses selected from SOC 240, 242, 336, 375, 403, 413, 428, and 452 (6); and two courses selected from SOC 300, 330, 331, 332, 403, 410, 420, 497, 498, and 499 (6). SOC 300, 497, 498, and 499 may be used only when the subject matter is central to criminology and/or criminal justice; students should consult with the program coordinator before enrolling in one to ensure the course can be used for the major. No more than three credits in independent study and/or field experience may be used toward the 30 credits required for the major. Students in this major must fulfill the foreign language/cross-cultural competence requirement by demonstrating competence in a foreign language, taking six credits in a foreign language, or by study abroad in an approved academic program for at least one semester. They may not use cross-cultural competence courses to fulfill this requirement. In addition to the required courses, students selecting this option are strongly encouraged to take PSC 388 and PSC 472.

A total of 120 credits is required for graduation.

Organizational Analysis Option. A minimum of 30 credits in sociology is required including SOC 100, 301, 320, 350, 401, 495 (12); and six credits in sociology at the 300 level or above. No more than six credits in independent study and/or field experience courses may be used toward the 30 credits required for the major. In addition, students selecting this option must complete ECN 201 and 202 (6); MTH 111 (3); STA 308 and 412* (6); CSC 201* (4); WRT 333 (3); BUS 340, 341, 343, 345, 442, and either BUS 315 or BUS 443 or BUS 448 (18).

*Note: BUS 210 and 212 may be substituted for STA 308 and 412; and BUS 110 may be substituted for CSC 201 if these courses are already completed when the student transfers into the B.S. program.

Admission to this option is open to only 15 students per graduating class. Applications for admission will be reviewed only once each year, usually on or about March 1. Students must apply by the end of February by submitting their names to the University College for Academic Success advisor for sociology or to the chairperson of the Department of Sociology and Anthropology. To be considered for the organizational analysis option, students must have earned a minimum of 45 credits by the application deadline and must have at least a 2.00 grade point average. Preference for admission will be given to those individuals with the highest grade point averages.

A total of 120 credits is required for graduation.

Spanish

The Department of Modern and Classical Languages and Literatures offers the Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree with a major in Spanish. The department also offers the Master of Arts (M.A.) program in Spanish.

Faculty: Professors de los Heros, Morín (section coordinator), Trubiano, and White; Associate Professor Echevarria; Professor Emeritus Gitlitz.

For the Spanish major, students will complete a minimum of 30 credits (maximum 45), including SPA 325 and three 400-level courses (excluding SPA 421). SPA 421 may be used as part of the remaining 18 required credits. Note: SPA 101, 102, 321, 391, 392, and 393 cannot be counted toward the Spanish major. Students may also include LIN 202 and 220, and—with permission of the advisor, section head, department chairperson, and dean—up to two courses in allied fields such as history, art, and anthropology. These requirements are the same for the secondary education major.

A summer field workshop (SPA 310) in Spain or Spanish America is occasionally offered for three to six credits. For information, see the section head.

Students in the International Engineering Program (IEP) or the International Business Program (IBP) must take SPA 312, 316, 317, 321, 325, and a 400-level engineering or business course taught in Spanish, designated SPA 412 for engineering students and SPA 421 for business students. IEP or IBP students beginning their study of Spanish at the 200 level or higher may opt to take up to six credits of Portuguese toward the completion of the major in Spanish. IEP or IBP students do not have to take three 400-level courses in Spanish, but must take at least one 400-level literature course in Spanish. Note: SPA 101, 102, 391, 392, and 393 cannot be counted toward the major for IEP or IBP students. The 6-credit Portuguese option is available to IEP and IBP students only. Students simultaneously completing the International Engineering Program or the International Business Program and the B.A. with a major in Spanish may also use three credits of Spanish literature toward the Fine Arts and Literature Basic Liberal Studies requirement. In addition, students in these programs are exempt from the one-course-per-discipline rule in Letters, Social Sciences, and Natural Sciences.

A total of 120 credits is required for graduation. At least 42 of these must be in courses numbered 300 or above.

Statistical Science

Minor in Statistics. Students who wish to declare a minor in statistics must earn credit for STA 409 (3), 412 (3), MTH 451 (3), and three three-credit statistics courses chosen with prior approval of the chairperson of the Department of Computer Science and Statistics.

Theatre

The Department of Theatre offers a Bachelor of Fine Arts (B.F.A.) degree.

Faculty: Professor McGlasson, chairperson. Professor Swift; Associate Professors Howard, Wittwer, and Wortman; Lecturer Hawkridge.

Productions at URI cover the range of theatre forms, ancient to modern, with an emphasis on contemporary and experimental work. All members of the University community may participate in productions.

The criteria used to transfer students out of University College for Academic Success into the Department of Theatre are 24 credits and a 2.00 GPA.

BACHELOR OF ARTS

Enrollment in this program is currently suspended with the exception of students enrolled in the elementary education program. Elementary education students who do not complete the elementary education program must switch to the B.F.A. program in order to earn a degree in theatre.

Students must fulfill the elementary education requirements as well as a total of 33 credits (maximum 48) as follows: THE 111 (3), 161 (3), 181 (3), 221 (3), 250 (3), 261 (3), 307 (3), 321 (3), 381 and 382 (6), 383 or 384 or 481 (3). Potential B.A. candidates are urged to complete THE 111, 112, 161, and 181 by the end of their freshman year. B.A. candidates may elect up to 15 more credits in theatre with the approval of their department advisor.

A total of 120 credits is required for graduation. At least 42 of these must be in courses numbered 300 or above.

BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS

The B.F.A. program is intended for highly motivated students who wish their education to emphasize a major theatrical field of interest. The program offers concentrated study in acting, design and theatre technology, directing, and stage management. Specific requirements of these areas are flexible to suit students’ individual needs.

All B.F.A. students are required to complete 37 credits in core courses distributed as follows: THE 111 (3), 161 (3), 181 (3), 221 (3), 250 (3), 261 (3), 291 (2), 321 (3), 351 or 352 (3); three courses from 381 (3), 382 (3), 383 or 384 or 481 (3) to total nine credits; and 391 (2). All B.F.A. candidates are urged to select a course from ENG 362, 366, 446, or 472, and to complete THE 111, 161, and 181 by the end of their freshman year.

In addition to the core requirements, each student selects one of the following specializations. Students must notify the office of the dean of the area of specialization they have selected. B.F.A. students selected for an internship program may substitute up to 12 credits for theatre courses in their area of specialization, subject to departmental approval. Transfer students, late entries into the theatre major, and others wishing to modify this schedule of B.F.A. requirements may do so in consultation with their faculty advisor and with permission of the department chairperson.

Acting. These students must complete an additional 40 credits: THE 112 (3), 211 and 212 (6), 213 and 214 (2), 300 or 301 (3), 311 and 312 (6), 313 and 314 (2), 350 (1), 400 or 401 (3), 411 and 412 (6), 417 and 418 (2). Select six credits from THE 217, 227, 237, and 413. Recommended electives include courses in related fields such as anthropology, art, communication studies, history, literature, music, psychology, and sociology.

A total of 120 credits is required for this specialization.

Design and Theatre Technology. Students selecting design and theatre technology must complete an additional 31 credits: THE 300 (3), 301 (3), 351 or 352 (3) to complete the sequence begun in the core curriculum; 350 (1), 355 (3), 365 (3), 371 (3); and 12 credits selected from 362 (3), 400 (3), 401 (3), 415 (12), 451 (3), 455 (3), 463 (3), 465 (3), 475 (3). Recommended electives include ARH 251, 252, ART 207, and courses in related fields.

A total of 120 credits is required for this specialization.

Directing. Students selecting directing must complete an additional 35 credits: THE 300 or 301 or 307 (3), 322 (3), 331 (3), 341 (3), 355 or 365 or 371 (3), 400 or 401 (3), 420 (3), and 484 (3). They must also complete a three-semester sequence in acting: 112 (3), 211 (3), 213 (1), 212 (3), and 214 (1), to total eleven (11).

Recommended electives include courses in anthropology, art history, history, literature, music, psychology, and sociology.

A total of 120 credits is required for this specialization.

Stage Management. Students selecting stage management must complete an additional 30 credits: COM 351 (3); management course (to be approved by chair) (3); THE 300 (3), 301 (3), 341 (3), 355 or 365 (3), 371 (3), 400 (3), 401 (3), 441 (3).

A total of 120 credits is required for this specialization.

Minor in Music Voice Performance. See Music earlier in this section.

Writing and Rhetoric

Part of the Harrington School of Communication and Media, the Writing and Rhetoric Program offers the Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree.

Faculty: Professors Reynolds and Schwegler; Associate Professors Dyehouse, Hensley Owens, and Miles; Assistant Professors Gottschalk-Druschke, Omizo, and Ledbetter; Professor Emerita Shamoon.

The Major. This major is designed for undergraduate students who seek to expand their repertoire of writing for various public and private audiences. Graduates will have a strong foundation in rhetorical theory balanced with a wide range of situational practices common to professional writers. Coursework is balanced between in-class learning and experiential fieldwork in real-world settings. All graduates design their own digital electronic portfolios prior to graduation, demonstrating their ability to work with a range of technologies in producing and distributing their polished writing.

Writing and rhetoric majors must complete 30 credits (maximum 51) including the core courses of WRT 201, 235, 360, 490, and 495. Acceptable substitutions for WRT 490 are WRT 435, 484, or 512 (with curriculum modification form). At least 15 credits for the major must be completed from writing courses numbered 300 or above. Writing and rhetoric majors are strongly encouraged to complete a practicum experience, such as an internship (WRT 484) or a field experience course (WRT 383 or 385). A maximum of three credits for each of these experiential courses can count towards the major, unless the project substantially changes. Undergraduates wishing to take a 500- or 600-level course must secure the instructor’s permission.

A total of 120 credits is required for graduation. At least 42 of these credits must be in courses numbered 300 or above.

The Minor. Students who declare a minor in writing and rhetoric must complete 18 credits from WRT courses at or above the 200-level. Students must take at least one 200-level course. Students can apply toward the minor a maximum of three credits earned through WRT 383 and WRT 484 each. 100-level courses and WRT 391 and 392 will not be counted as part of the minor.

Think Big We Do

Copyright © 2014 University of Rhode Island.