University College for Academic Success

Introduction

Jayne Richmond, Dean
Linda Lyons, Assistant Dean
Dania Brandford-Calvo, Director, International Education
David Hayes, Coordinator, Academic Enhancement Center
Sarah Miller, Coordinator, Feinstein Civic Engagement Program
John Rooney, Coordinator, Transfer Resource Center
Kimberly Washor, Director, Center for Career and Experiential Education

University College for Academic Success (UCAS) is where all students will find support as they enter the university. All new students are enrolled in UCAS, regardless of major, until they matriculate to the academic college from which they will graduate. We provide academic advising to all majors, including a focus on those who are undecided about their major. We also provide support in the many aspects of undergraduate education that will help students to be successful, such as internships, career advising, service learning, study abroad and national student exchange, transfer resources and assistance with becoming better learners. We are here to support the journey from admission right through to graduation. We focus on getting the first years off to a great start with our freshmen seminars and orientation, early alert and mentoring programs, and continue this support through the undergraduate years, helping students to find the right majors and careers that will lead to success.

For more information, visit uri.edu/uc or call 401.874.2993.

In case of discrepancies between this Catalog and the departmental materials, this URI Catalog is considered definitive. Departmental websites and departmental curricular and course materials are maintained independently and do not necessarily reflect University-approved curricular and course information.

 

Undergraduate Orientation

Visit web.uri.edu/newstudent/orientation.

New Student Orientation. All new first-year undergraduate students attend a two-day orientation to plan their academic programs, meet with an academic advisor and register for first-term classes, learn about URI, and begin to acquire the skills essential for successful transition from high school and home to the University community. Admitted students begin receiving orientation registration materials in April.

Parents and family members of new students are invited to attend a specialized family orientation program, which coincides with New Student Orientation.

Transfer Orientation. This one-day program is designed to acquaint transfer students with some of the unique features and procedures of the University. Students meet with academic advisors and register for first-term classes.

Orientation for International Students. The Office of International Students and Scholars (OISS) has implemented an orientation program and ongoing workshops to provide assistance in personal, academic, and financial matters to our international community and their dependents. Through this venue, OISS contributes to the University of Rhode Island’s commitment to a global perspective. Staff members are available to help students adjust to life at the University and in the United States. For more information, email issoff@etal.uri.edu.

Academic Enhancement Center

Academic Enhancement Center. Located on the 4th floor of Roosevelt Hall the AEC supports academic achievement for students in all majors.
The AEC’s trained undergraduate and graduate staff offer interactive Supplemental Instruction (SI) sessions for selected courses and small group tutoring in all academic areas (by appointment and on a walk-in basis). Students may seek AEC services for specific courses or assignments, or for general academic coaching and assistance with organizational skills such as time management, effective listening, note taking, or test taking. The AEC also helps organize and facilitate study groups, and provides study group materials to students and faculty who wish to organize their own study groups. Workshops on study skills and organizational skills are offered by appointment to campus groups. Additionally, AEC staff work with faculty and staff to strengthen connections between classroom and lab learning and AEC services.

Up-to-date information on services available, office hours, tutor and teaching assistant schedules, tutor profiles, and special announcements can be found on the AEC website, at uri.edu/aec.

Visit harrington.uri.edu for information about the Writing Center, located within the AEC and administered by URI’s Department of Writing and Rhetoric, part of the Harrington School of Communication and Media.

Feinstein Civic Engagement Program

Established by a generous endowment from Rhode Island philanthropist Alan Shawn Feinstein in 1995, the Feinstein Civic Engagement Program promotes the integration of service with academic study in order to enhance student learning and involvement with communities and their agencies. First-year students are introduced to civic engagement through their required URI 101 course. Other programs include Americorps: Scholarships for Service; Clearinghouse for Volunteers; Feinstein Enriching America Program; First Book URI; URI S.A.V.E.S.; and Service Learning Courses. For more information go to uri.edu/experience/volunteer/ or contact the Feinstein Civic Engagement Program at 401.874.7422.

International Students

Visit uri.edu/iss.

The Office of International Students and Scholars (OISS) provides services for all internationals holding F and/or J nonimmigrant visa designations. OISS serves approximately 500 international visiting scholars, graduate and undergraduate students (degree and non-degree) and their dependents, from as many as 59 different nations. OISS is responsible for communicating and interpreting statutes, rules, and regulations that derive from the Department of Homeland Security, Department of State, Department of Justice, and the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (formerly known as the Immigration and Naturalization Services). OISS also disseminates information pertinent to international visitors from the RI Division of Motor Vehicles, the Internal Revenue Service, and the Social Security Administration.

The staff at OISS is committed to providing valuable and comprehensive services to our international community. OISS also provides workshops and cross-cultural programming events for students, their dependents, and scholars. The center serves as a cross-cultural meeting place, hosting social events and recreational trips. A comfortable lounge is equipped with many amenities and is open to any URI student or URI student organization. We cosponsor events with civic clubs, such as Rotary International, the Rhode Island Association of International Advisors, and New England Land Grant Colleges International Advisors.

For more information, contact issoff@etal.uri.edu or call 401.874.2395.

English Language Studies

Visit uri.edu/international.

Non-native-speaking students who want to continue to perfect their English so as to enhance their chances of success in their studies may do so by taking courses in the English Language Studies Program. ELS 112 and 122 are two regularly offered courses that count toward the written communication requirement in the general education program. Students who need these courses are strongly urged to take them in their freshman year. Students can also take ELS 312 and 322 to strengthen their oral English skills.

National Student Exchange Program

Visit uri.edu/international.

The National Student Exchange (NSE) program offers URI students the opportunity to study at more than 180 participating colleges and universities in 55 states, U.S. territories, and Canadian provinces, paying in-state rates or URI tuition while maintaining their status as URI students. NSE offers the opportunity to explore new geographical areas, experience academic diversity, and study under different educational and social circumstances in various parts of North America. Financial aid is available to participants. For further information, contact the Office of International Education and National Student Exchange in the International Student Center at 401.874.5546.

Study Abroad

Visit uri.edu/international.

The Office of International Education and National Student Exchange sponsors University programs abroad, helps students make arrangements for foreign study, and maintains information about overseas study programs. The office also assists in the evaluation of credits from study abroad. The University sponsors exchange programs with universities in Denmark, England, France, Germany, Japan, Korea, Mexico, Norway, and Spain, and URI is a member of several consortiums that enable URI students to participate in programs throughout the world. URI also participates in the New England-Quebec and New England-Nova Scotia exchange programs, making study available on an exchange basis at any of 21 English- and French-speaking universities in these Canadian provinces.

Many of these exchange programs make study abroad available to URI students at a modest cost. The study abroad director and advisors help students who wish to participate in these or other approved academic programs in choosing the appropriate programs, obtaining prior approval for courses to be taken abroad, and retaining matriculated status at URI during their absence from campus. Most forms of financial aid are applicable to study abroad. For more information, contact the Office of International Education and National Student Exchange.

Email: oie@etal.uri.edu. Website: uri.edu/international. Phone: 401.874.5546.

Center for Career and Experiential Education (CCEE)

Visit uri.edu/career

The Center for Career and Experiential Education (CCEE) engages students and alumni in a high quality personal and professional educational experience, from admission through employment. Career and internship advisors provide self assessments, searching and networking strategies, resume development and internship information sessions. The center offers RhodyNet, an online database of job and internship opportunities and events for our students and alums.

We also offer classes for career development (ITR 300) that engage students in self-reflection and work place skill development. This course helps students to increase awareness of the professional decision-making process, explore career choices, and expand understanding the relationship between education and the world of work. Students study key career development theories and learn how to integrate self-knowledge into occupational and life decisions, set goals, and devise strategies to attain these goals.

The academic internship program (ITR 301-304) provides students with full-time or part-time experiential learning opportunities (fall, spring, and summer). The program is designed for motivated students who wish to apply classroom learning to field experiences in career related settings. Student interns are supervised by a qualified professional at their placement site and by a faculty advisor from their academic major. Students from most undergraduate curriculums may apply for part-time or full-time internships and may earn from 6-15 free-elective credits. In order to apply to the program, a student must have a minimum GPA of 2.50 and junior or senior standing.

For more information, visit us on the first floor of Roosevelt Hall, online at uri.edu/career or call 401.874.2311.

Courses that Support Student Academic Success

CSV 301: Course-based Community Service – PRA: (1-3 crs.) Learning through a community service experience related to course content. Experience defined by a job description and learning contract; includes orientation and reflection. (Practicum) Service learning. Pre: junior standing or above, or permission of instructor. Concurrent enrollment in a course that offers community service experience. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. S/U only.

CSV 302: Community Service at URI – PRA: (1-4 crs.) Learning through a community service project that addresses a specific community need at the University. Project proposed and supervised by an instructor, and varies each semester. Includes mandatory seminar. (Practicum) Service learning. Pre: junior standing or above, or permission of instructor. May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits.

CSV 303: Service In The Community – PRA: (1-4 crs.) Learning through a community service project that addresses a specific need in the off-campus community. Project proposed and supervised by an instructor and varies each semester. (Practicum) Service learning. Pre: junior standing or above, or permission of instructor. May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits. S/U only.

EDC 279: Career Development Seminar – SEM: (1 cr.) Individualized approach to career concerns, skill identification, self-awareness, career development theory, decision making. Emphasis on understanding long- and short-term goals. (Seminar)

HDF 298: Contemporary Issues in Student Development – SEM: (1-3 crs.) Student leadership models and practices in various student development settings, such as Student Affairs, Student Life, Residential Life, University College, and Health Services. (Seminar) May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

ITR 300: Career Planning: Concepts and Skills – SEM: (1-3 crs.) Identify personal strengths, interests, and professional values related to career exploration. Develop professional job and internship search skills.

ITR 301: Field Experience I – PRA: (3-12 crs.) Field experience gained at placement site through participation in the ITR program. The experience will be defined by a job description and learning contract arranged by the ITR director between the student intern, the intern’s faculty advisor, and the relevant agency supervisor. (Practicum) Pre: junior or senior standing, a minimum quality point average of 2.50, participation in the ITR program, and permission of faculty advisor. May be repeated for a maximum of 24 credits. S/U credit.

ITR 302: Field Experience II – PRA: (3-12 crs.) Field experience gained at placement site through participation in the ITR program. The experience will be defined by a job description and learning contract arranged by the ITR director between the student intern, the intern’s faculty advisor, and the relevant agency supervisor. (Practicum) Pre: junior or senior standing, a minimum quality point average of 2.50, participation in the ITR program, and permission of faculty advisor. May be repeated for a maximum of 24 credits. S/U credit.
ITR 303: Colloquium I – SEM: (3 crs.) Seminar format. Discussions of issues and problems raised by internship experiences in public service agencies. (Seminar) Pre: concurrent enrollment in 301 for 303. Required for and open only to students enrolled in the ITR program.
ITR 304: Colloquium II – SEM: (3 crs.) Seminar format. Discussions of issues and problems raised by internship experiences in public service agencies. (Seminar) Pre: concurrent enrollment in 302 for 304. Required for and open only to students enrolled in the ITR program.

URI 101: Planning for Academic Success - SEM: (1 cr.) Introduces first-year students to the traditions of higher education and academic culture and to significant societal and personal issues that bear on developing goals for the undergraduate years. Required of all new freshmen and new transfer students with less than 24 credits. May not be repeated for credit.

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