Modern and Classical Languages and Literatures

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Arabic

Academics

Suggested Minor: Arabic Language and Culture

The Arabic program does not yet have a formal minor program, but students at URI are able to develop their own minor with a faculty sponsor. Until a formal minor is approved, we suggest that the student take the courses listed below to develop a strong basis in the Arabic language with knowledge of the history, politics, and culture of the Arabic-speaking world. Note that some of these courses are still in the approval process and may not yet be listed in the catalog.

To pursue this minor, the student will need to fill out this form. You should pay close attention to the restrictions on that form – note especially that one course cannot count for both a major and a minor.

Please contact the head of the Arabic section, Alexander Magidow, to discuss the minor:

To complete the minor, you must take a total of 18 credits, 12 of which must be at the 200 level or above. The following are suggested courses to fulfill that requirement.

Arabic Language Courses (min. 8 credits)

You should take at least 8 credits of Arabic at the 200 level or above. This will entail taking at at least 6 credits of Arabic at the 100 level. The following are the 200+ level Arabic courses currently offered:

ARB 211 (Intensive Intermediate Arabic I – 4 credits)

ARB 212 (Intensive Intermediate Arabic II – 4 credits)

ARB 311 (Intensive Advanced Arabic I – 4 credits)

ARB 312 (Intensive Advanced Arabic II – 4 credits)

Arabic Culture Courses (3-6 credits)

You should take at least one course in culture, history, religion or politics. The following are some suggested courses. Note that these are three credit courses – if you have 8 credits of 200+ level Arabic, this will add up to only 11 credits above the 200 level, so you may need to take an additional course. Other courses can be used for the cultural component with permission of the instructor sponsoring the minor:

ARB 325 (Topics in Arabic Culture in Translation)

PSC 312 (Politics of the Middle East)

PSC 482 (Secularism and Islamism in the Modern World)

HIS 379 (The Jews of Islamic Lands)

HIS 376 (Women in Muslim Societies)

GWS 350 (Women in Islam)

Additional Courses

You may also be interested in the following classes, but note that they are below the 200 level:

HPR 107 (Introduction to Islam)

HIS 176 (Islamic History: From the Origins of Islam to 1492)

HIS 178 (History of the Modern Middle East)

Course Offerings

Courses ending in a ‘1’ are only offered in the fall semester, while courses ending in a ‘2’ are only offered in the spring semester. If you have no prior experience in Arabic, you must start with ARB 111 in the fall. Note that all introductory courses are four-credits.

ARB 111: Beginning Intensive Arabic I

This four-credit course is an intensive introduction to the Arabic language, intended for students with no prior background in Arabic. By the end of the course, students will be able to read and write the alphabet and use basic vocabulary to hold brief, polite interactions with native speakers of Arabic. This course focuses on the spoken variety of Arabic used in conversation and social media. Students will also keep a cultural portfolio on topics of their choosing, and will be expected to read an Arabic-language novel in English translation.

ARB 112: Beginning Intensive Arabic II

This four-credit course is a follow up to ARB 111. By the end of the course, students be able to conduct more complex interactions with native speakers of Arabic. This course focuses on the spoken variety of Arabic used in conversation and social media but begins introducing more vocabulary and grammar specific to Standard Arabic. Students will also keep a cultural portfolio on topics of their choosing, and will be expected to read an Arabic-language novel in English translation.

ARB 211: Intermediate Intensive Arabic I

This course is the follow up to ARB 112 or ARB 102, and is also a four-credit intensive course. Students will continue to build on their vocabulary and knowledge of spoken Arabic, while developing their skills in written and spoken standard Arabic. By the end of this course, students will be able to perform a variety of basic concrete functions in the language. Students will continue to keep a cultural portfolio on topics of their choosing, and will be expected to read an Arabic-language novel in English translation.

ARB 212: Intermediate Intensive Arabic II

This course is the follow up to ARB 211, and is also a four-credit intensive course. Students will be continue developing their skills in both formal and spoken Arabic. By the end of this course, students will have the ability to deal with many types of interactions, both written and spoken, with native speakers of Arabic. Students will continue to keep a cultural portfolio on topics of their choosing, and will be expected to read an Arabic-language novel in English translation.

ARB 311: Advanced Intensive Arabic I

This course is a follow up to ARB 212 or ARB 200, and is also a four-credit intensive course. Students will focus on making use of formal Arabic in writing, listening and speaking, while continuing to develop a broader vocabulary in colloquial spoken Arabic. By the end of this course, students will be able to deal with some abstract topics in Arabic. Students will continue to keep a cultural portfolio on topics of their choosing, and will be expected to read an Arabic-language novel in English translation or an Arabic-language short story.

ARB 312: Advanced Intensive Arabic II

This course is a follow up to ARB 312, and is also a four-credit intensive course. Students will focus on making use of formal Arabic in writing, listening and speaking, while continuing to develop a broader vocabulary in colloquial spoken Arabic. By the end of this course, students will able to deal with abstract and complex topics in Arabic. The class will include extensive reading in Arabic, whether in Arabic literature or media. Students will continue to keep a cultural portfolio on topics of their choosing, and will be expected to analyze readings in Arabic for cultural content.

ARB 325: Topics in Arabic Culture in Translation

This course covers topics in Arabic culture, literature, film and other topics via texts and readings translated into English. No background in Arabic is needed. The goal of this course is to foster appreciation of the cultural output of the Arabic speaking world, past and present.

ARB 497: Directed

This course is an independent study. If you have special Arabic learning needs that do not fit any of the courses available in a particular semester, then contact Alexander Magidow to find a solution that fits your situation.

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