Center for Nonviolence & Peace Studies

Promotes peace and a global beloved community through nonviolence.

Faculty Affiliates

Kristine M. Cabral

Kristine M. Cabral

Lecturer – Communication studies

cabral@uri.edu

Kristine is a graduate of the Communication Studies graduate program here at URI. Among her achievements at the University, Kristine received the Department Excellence Award, Doody Scholarship, Outstanding Graduate Student Award, Graduate Student Teaching Award, authored three scholarly papers accepted to regional and national conference, and collaborated with colleague, Kevin McClure, on her first scholarly publication.

Kristine’s interests lie in the area of postmodern thought, identity formation, critical studies in advertising, and nonviolent communication. She has authored papers on the social construction of personal identity, the ambiguity of language, and Burke’s Dramatism. Kristine is also a certified level 1 trainer in Kingian Nonviolence Conflict Reconciliation. She hopes to weave this training into the development of a nonviolent communication course so that we may learn that words used as weapons of violence do not serve us. The pathway to peace begins with dialogue driven by compassion and understanding.

Her desire to study and teach in the area of communication was inspired by the realization that the study of communication is the study of our meaning-making process. The symbol system we call language is the tool we use to communicate; and through communication, we define, comprehend, manipulate, critique, complicate, limit, and often times, confuse the human condition. Ultimately, it is the tool we use (and, paradoxically, that uses us) to form identity and structure human reality. If we desire to better understand ourselves and each other we must begin with the study of language.

 

Nancy Caronia

Nancy Caronia

Lecturer -

Writing & Rhetoric

ncaronia@my.uri.edu

Nancy Caronia is a certified Level I nonviolence trainer and a  Ph. D. candidate in Literature at The University of Rhode Island. She teaches Contemporary American and Anglophone Literatures of Ethnicity and Race. She would love to travel and co-train in communities where gender and women’s issues are prevalent. She has practiced tai chi for 25 years.

Ashish Chadha

Ashish Chadha

Assistant Professor – Film & Media

avikunthak@uri.edu

Ashish Chadha is a filmmaker and a cultural anthropologist. He has been making films in India since the mid nineties. His films have been shown worldwide in film festivals, galleries and museums. He has made half dozen of short films and three feature films – Shadows Formless(2007), Katho Upanaishad (2011) and Rati Chakravyuh (2013). Most recently his short filmVakratunda Swaha (2010) was long listed for the Skoda Prize for Indian Contemporary Art, 2011, and was featured at Taipei Biennial 2012.

His films have been shown at Tate Modern, London, Centre George Pompidou, Paris, Pacific Film Archive, Berkeley, along with London, Locarno, Rotterdam, and Berlin film festivals among other locations. He has had retrospective of his works at Goethe Institute, Calcutta (2004), Les Inattendus, Lyon (2006), Yale University (2008) and the National Centre for Performing Arts, Mumbai (2008), Festival International Signes de Nuit, Paris (2012) and 7th Signs Film Festival, Trivandrum (2103). His scholarly works have been published in the Journal of Social ArchaeologyJournal of Material CultureContributions to Indian Sociology and The Indian Economic and Social History Review among other locations. He has a PhD in cultural anthropology from Stanford University and before coming to URI had taught at Yale University.

Yvette Harps-Logan, Ph.D.

Yvette Harps-Logan, Ph.D.

yvette1smAssociate Professor

Textiles, Fashion Merchandizing & Design

ylogan@uri.edu

Yvette teaches retailing courses: TMD 232 Fashion Retailing, TMD 332 Fashion Merchandise Buying, and TMD 432 Fashion Merchandising Operations Control. Research interests include fashion merchandising and marketing and minority consumer behavior. She directs retailing internships.

Yvette serves on the URI Foundation Grants Committee.  She also advises at University College.  Her professional organizations include the International Textile and Apparel Association and the American Association of Family and Consumer Sciences.

Sandy Jean Hicks, Ph.D.

Sandy Jean Hicks, Ph.D.

Associate Professor – Education

sjhicks@mail.uri.edu

Sandy received her Ph.D. from the University of Arizona and teaches Social Studies in the School of Education. Research interests are in the teaching of Social Studies, integrating technology into the classroom, and the effects of teacher professional development. She incorporates the nonviolence concepts of the civil rights movement into her teaching of history and has completed the Introduction to Kingian Nonviolence at the 2012 International Nonviolence Summer Institute.

 

 

Kathryn Lee Johnson

Kathryn Lee Johnson

 

Adjunct Faculty – Education

Kay Johnson Bueno de Mesquita teaches in the School of Education and supervises student teachers at The University of Rhode Island. She teaches preservice teachers how to infuse nonviolence into children’s literature, connecting story themes to King’s Six Principles of Nonviolence. Kay was trained in the process of nonviolence by Dr. Bernard LaFayette, Jr. Together, they have co-authored a book, In Peace and Freedom, about Bernard’s civil rights experiences during the Alabama Voting Rights Campaign in Selma, 1963-1965. She and her husband, Paul Bueno de Mesquita have two sons who are also nonviolence trainers and they’ve had the joy of training together for the past several years.

Kristin Johnson

Kristin Johnson

 

Assistant Professor – Political Science

kristin_johnson@mail.uri.edu

Kristin Johnson (Ph.D. Claremont Graduate University, 2007) joined the Political Science Department in the Fall of 2007. Her current research interests include examining the relationship between state capabilities and civil conflict, resource distribution and development, remittances, and the subnational study of political and economic transitions. She is the former Co-Editor of International Interactions and current member of the TransPacific Consortium.  Her research has appeared in the Journal of Peace ResearchPublic Opinion QuarterlyInternational Interactions, and several book chapters.

At URI, Kristin teaches courses in International Political Economy, Comparative Politics, International Development, Civil Conflict, and African Politics.

Diane E. Kern

Diane E. Kern

Assistant Professor – Education

dkern@uri.edu

Diane is a long-time advocate of nonviolence and has incorporated the concept into her teacher training, integrating the Kingian principles into the teaching of literature to pre-service teachers of high school English teachers. Diane is a certified Level I Kingian Nonviolence trainer.

Research interests are in Comprehension Strategy Instruction and Teacher Education in English Language Arts and Literacy.

Celina Pereira, M.D., FAAP

Celina Pereira, M.D., FAAP

Physician – College of Health/Adolescent Medicine (Retired)

Diversity Award 2008

celinap@mail.uri.edu

Celina is a medical doctor who believes in the significant role of the mind-body-spirit connection in one’s overall health and sense of well being. A lifelong practitioner of meditation, she has been instrumental in establishing courses on stress reduction  and facilitating weekly guided meditations for students and staff at URI. She was honored with the Diversity Award in 2008. She sponsored the annual Harmony and Peace Meditation Session for many years during Diversity Week, that was enjoyed and appreciated by hundreds.

 

 

 

Rosaria A. Pisa

Rosaria A. Pisa

 

Lecturer – Sociology/Anthropology

rpisa@mail.uri.edu

Professor Pisa originates from Naples, Italy from where she emigrated with her family to the U.S. as a child. In the U.S., Prof. Pisa has lived in Pennsylvania, Texas and Massachusetts before settling in Rhode Island with her family. As a child, Prof. Pisa dreamed of seeing the world, connecting with people from different cultures, and communicating with them in their own language whenever possible.

Prof. Pisa is multilingual, has traveled extensively and has lived in Germany and Mexico for a time. It was on one of her sojourns abroad that she came to know and love Mexico. Her passion for Mexico ultimately shaped the direction of her graduate studies in political science (M.A. 1992) and sociology (Ph.D. 2001). Realizing her childhood dream of intimately connecting with other cultures, Prof. Pisa has conducted in-depth fieldwork in rural and urban Mexico since 1993. Her research has evolved from studying the impact of the privatization of communal land on community life to her current focus on the gender dynamics of local and organic farming.

Prof. Pisa regularly teaches SOC 100 General Sociology and courses in the area of social inequality such as SOC 240 Race and Ethnic Relations. She also teaches two interdisciplinary courses cross listed with anthropology, SOC/APG 329 Contemporary Mexican Society and SOC/APG 416 Migration in the Americas.

Prof. Pisa research on the Mexican Agrarian Reform and land privatization has been published in Urban Anthropology and Habitat International as well as several edited volumes here and in Mexico. She has presented her research at numerous international conferences, in Mexico, and the World Bank.

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