The Women’s March: United We Stand

Painting by Laurie Doctor
Painting by Laurie Doctor

The Women’s March: United We Stand

by Ali Armani

The 2016 presidential race has been eventful, to say the least, and inspired outrage and fear. But since Election Day, where fear of the future was at its peak, there has been as much determination as well. The determination of people who will recognize and protect their rights and the rights of their fellow human beings.

On the day of Trump’s inauguration, millions rallied through Washington to take a stand for important causes, some such as women’s rights, LGBTQ rights, disability rights, and immigrant rights. For any hope the Women’s March has given, we can thank the many women who helped make the March happen. Taking root as a simple Facebook event, made by retired Hawaii attorney Teresa Shook, these seeds have grown beyond anything that could have been expected. Roughly 470,000 people have attended the March.

And these numbers only count Washington.

Spreading a message of empowerments and unity, the March has stretched far beyond the United States. In every continent of the world, Antarctica included, millions are following the example set in Washington. These massive numbers, joined with everyone’s inner strength and fierce resolve, are rising up for justice and unifying the people towards a vision of peace and welfare for all. The People of not just the United States, but the entire world, are speaking up for a common cause, and they have most definitely been heard.

With participants reminding us of the importance of intersectional feminism, the Women’s March went beyond just one issue, and became a chance for people of all backgrounds to come together. Those who began the Women’s March adhered to the principle that women’s rights are human rights, regardless of race, ethnicity, religion, immigration status, sexual identity, gender expression, economic status, age or disability.

The amount of people who are standing up to what they know is unjust is enough to remind us that we are neither powerless nor voiceless. Each and every one of us can take a part in making a positive change in these times, not just for ourselves but for everyone around us. Events like the Women’s March will send clear messages, and contacting our state officials is another way we can make ourselves be heard. In Gandhi’s principles of Satyagraha, people must become the change they want to make happen. Even the small, random acts of kindness and standing with each other can be enough. Enough to remind us of one crucial fact; “United we stand, divided we fall”.