Undergraduate Minors

There are four minor fields of study available within the Department of Natural Resources Science at URI. All minors at URI require 18 credits of coursework (see NRS minor requirements specified below), at least 12 of these 18 credits must be at the 200 level or higher, and all courses in the minor must be taken for a letter grade. Students must also earn at least a 2.0 quality point average in these courses. To complete a minor at URI, students must submit a completed “Minor Field of Study” form to the academic dean’s office no later than the beginning of the final semester prior to graduation. Click on the link below for a pdf copy of the Minor Field of Study form.

“Minor Field of Study” Form

  • This minor field of specialization provides students in-depth training in the use of GIS and remote sensing technology and application of geospatial data processing methods to environmental problem solving. Students who declare a minor in GIS and Remote Sensing must complete 18 credit hours consisting of the following core courses: NRS 409, NRS 410, NRS 415, NRS 516, and NRS 522. The remaining credits may be taken from NRS 423, NRS 524, NRS 533, or CPL 511. Students minoring in GIS and Remote Sensing are encouraged to take a capstone course that allows them to apply their analytical skills in a real-world application.

  • The International Development minor is available to undergraduates interested in employment overseas or in domestic enterprises with international operations. Students choosing this minor must complete 18 credits, with a maximum of six credits at the 100 or 200 level. Students must complete the following: (1) NRS 300 (3 credits); (2) language or culture (six to nine credits), to be met by the completion of at least six language credits through the intermediate level (103 or 104) or placement in the conversation and composition level (205 or 206), and completion of at least six credits in the same language or culture cluster (placement for course work is determined by the Educational Testing Service exam as administered by the University’s Department of Modern and Classical Languages and Literature in the following languages: French, Spanish, German, and Russian; the University also offers Portuguese and selected other languages that, with permission, could satisfy the requirement; six credits are allowed in the general education requirements for language and culture); (3) an approved internship (three to six credits) providing international development experience during the junior or senior year (NRS 487); and (4) NRS 496 (three credits) of an advanced-level seminar. See “Courses of Instruction” for descriptions of NRS 300 and 487, and NRS 496.

  • This minor field of specialization provides students in-depth training in the application of soils information to solve environmental problems and issues. Students fulfilling the requirements of the Soil Environmental Science minor meet the qualifications for basic membership in the Society of Soil Scientists of Southern New England, are eligible for certification as a soil scientist under the American Registry of Certified Professional Soil Scientists, and meet the requirements for federal job listings under soil scientists. Students who declare a minor in Soil Environmental Science must complete 18 credits from the following courses: NRS 212, NRS 312, NRS 351, NRS 361, NRS 412, NRS 426, NRS 450, NRS 452, NRS 471, NRS 510, NRS 567, or GEO 515. Students minoring in Soil Environmental Science are encouraged to take a capstone course that allows them to apply their analytical skills in a real-world application.

  • This minor field of specialization provides students in-depth training in the principles of managing wildlife populations and their habitats. Students who declare a minor in Wildlife and Conservation Biology must complete at least 18 credits of NRS courses within the WCB major curriculum, at least 12 of these 18 credits must be at the 200 level or higher, and all courses in the minor must be taken for a letter grade. Students minoring in Wildlife and Conservation Biology are encouraged to take a capstone course that allows them to apply their analytical skills in a real-world application.

  • This interdepartmental minor provides students in-depth, interdisciplinary training in the principles and application of restoration science and management to solve environmental problems and issues. Students who declare a minor in restoration science and management are required to complete 18 credits, including 4 credits from NRS 401, 3 credits from NRS 543, 3-6 credits from one or more experiential learning project courses (NRS 395, NRS 397, GEO 397, NRS 491, NRS 492 NRS 495, NRS 497), and 4-8 credits from one or more of the following courses: BIO 262, GEO 103, GEO 320, NRS 223, NRS 445, NRS 475. Students minoring in restoration science and management are encouraged to take a capstone
    course that allows them to apply their analytical skills in a real-world application and to
    engage with NGO, state, federal agencies on projects and internships.