Using Videos Someone Else Made

We hope that your Spring Break was chock-full of fabulous video-making and that, after last week’s post,  you now feel like your own version of an educational Scorsese. But, just in case it wasn’t and you don’t, we have some other video ideas for you…

If making your own videos seems a little daunting, or if you just don’t feel like you have time right now, then why not use someone else’s video(s) to get you started? There are multiple up-for-grabs educational video resources, both professional and homemade, made by faculty just like you. While you’ll need to do some online research to find just what you’re looking for, that research will ultimately help you to better understand what constitutes a good (and not so good) video tutorial, so that when you do feel up to making your own videos,  you’ll be even more knowledgeable about the process. Here are a couple of places to start your search:

We recommend visiting the Khan Academy, a nonprofit organization whose sole goal is to provide free, online, educational resources to anyone interested in using them. The majority of these videos come with transcripts for accessibility purposes. Check out this Ted Talk by Salmon Khan, founder of the Khan Academy. In it, he talks about the power of video, how the Khan Academy came about, and how flipping your classroom through the use of video can benefit your students.

You can also search YouTube for the video content you’re looking for. While you’re likely to wind up with as many misses as hits by taking this route, you’ll also be surprised by how much good stuff is out there. Of course, in terms of accessibility, it will probably be up to you to provide a transcript.

And then there is lynda.com – an online training library that offers video tutorials on a variety of subject, all of which come with transcripts. Lynda.com is not free, but you can browse its contents to see if a subscription might be worthwhile to you or your department. There is also the lynda.com channel on YouTube, which offers for free about 10% of what the subscription site houses.