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Online Courses

How to Register | Cost of Tuition | Available Online Courses

Regardless of where you go to school or where you will be living this summer, you can save money and get the credits you need by taking an online course through URI Summer Sessions!

Summer Session 1: 5/18/15 – 6/19/15

Summer Session 2: 6/22/15 – 7/24/15

Summer Session 3: 5/18/15 – 7/24/15

Register Today! 

 

How to register for a URI Summer Sessions online course

If this is your first time registering for a course at the University of Rhode Island, you will need to submit a Non-Degree Student Application Form (PDF) to the University in order to be issued a UserID. Be sure to include your email address on the form. Once the form has been submitted, the student will be entered into e-Campus and assigned a UserID. The student will then be able to register with e-Campus and sign up for courses.

For current students, please register online via e-Campus

 

Tuition for online classes at URI during the summer

Summer courses are offered at discounted tuition!
For example, the tuition for a 3-credit undergraduate course is:
In-State  $675 ($225 per credit)
Out-of-State  $1224 ($408 per credit)

Click here to see additional tuition rates or to find out what additional fees apply.

 

 

The following is a preliminary course listing and is subject to change.
Please continue to check back. e-Campus will always reflect the most up-to-date information.

 

2015 Summer Sessions Listing of Online Courses

 

General Education Offerings

Major-Specific Course Offerings

 

Major & Career Development Course Offerings

Graduate Course Offerings

General Education Courses

AFS 190: Issues in Biotechnology
Introduction to modern biotechnology in medical, pharmaƒceutical, forensic, agricultural, marine, and environmental applications. Consideration of ethical, environmental, health, and social issues. Gen. Ed. Category: Natural Science (N).
Summer Session 3 – TBD, 3 credits

BCH 190: Issues in Biotechnology
Introduction to modern biotechnology in medical, pharmaceutical, forensic, agricultural, marine, and environmental applications. Consideration of ethical, environmental, health, and social issues. Gen. Ed. Category: Natural Science (N).
Summer Session 3 – TBD, 3 credits

CLA 395: Greek Mythology: Gods, Heroes, and Humans
Nature and function of myth in the ancient world and today: ideas of divinity, relationship of divine to human, origins of cosmos and human society, male and female principles, power hierarchies, coming of age, the heroic experience. Theories of myth analysis. Readings in English translation. Gen. Ed. Categories: Fine Arts and Literature, Diversity
Summer Sesssion 1 – Daniel Carpenter, 3 credits - FULL!

CPL 202: Introductory Urban Geography: Understanding Cities
Introduction to urbanization processes, primarily in North America; national settlement systems; intra urban form; migration, racial, ethnic, gender, and class segregation; urban economics; environmental issues; planning and governance; urban applications of GIS. Gen. Ed. Category: Social Sciences (S), Diversity [D].
Summer Session 3 – Farhad Atash

CSC 101: Computing Concepts
Capabilities and limitations of computers. Applications of computers in today’s society. Overview of computing systems and programs. Students will complete several projects using a computer. Not open to students who have credit in any college-level computer science course, or to computer science majors. Gen. Ed. Category: Mathematical and Quantitative Reasoning (MQ).
Summer Session 1 – TBD, 4 credits
Summer Session 2 – TBD, 4 credits

ECN 100: Introduction to Economics
General overview of concepts economists employ to address issues of public policy. Description of major institutions of present-day American economy. Historical approach to subject matter. Gen. Ed. Categories: Social Sciences (S), Diversity [D].
Summer Session 1 – Richard McIntyre, 3 credits

ECN 201: Principles of Economics: Microeconomics
Principles underlying resource allocation, production, and income distribution in a market economy. Topics include demand and supply, consumer behavior, firm behavior, market structure, and elementary welfare analysis. Institutional foundations explored. Gen. Ed. Categories: Social Sciences (S).
Summer Session 1 – Robert Van Horn (two sections)

ECN 201H: Honors Section of Principles of Economics: Microeconomics
Principles underlying resource allocation, production, and income distribution in a market economy. Topics include demand and supply, consumer behavior, firm behavior, market structure, and elementary welfare analysis. Institutional foundations explored. Prereqs: Overall GPA of 3.30. Gen. Ed. Categories: Social Sciences (S), Diversity [D].
Summer Session 2 – Arthur Mead, 3 credits

ECN 202: Principles of Economics: Macroeconomics
Principles underlying aggregate demand and aggregate supply in a market economy. Topics include national income determination, inflation, unemployment, economic growth, and international trade. Institutional foundations explored. Prereqs: ECN 201 or equivalent. Gen. Ed. Category: Social Sciences (S).
Summer Session 2 – Arthur Mead (two sections), 3 credits

FLM 101: Introduction to Film Media
Introduction to techniques of film practice, film history, genres, analysis of film texts, and reading of film images in their aesthetic, cultural, and literary context. Gen. Ed. Categories: Fine Arts and Literature (A), Diversity [D].
Summer Session 1 – TBD, 3 credits
Summer Session 2 – Keith Brown, 3 credits
Summer Session 2 – Rebecca Romanow, 3 credits

FLM 204: History of Film I
A survey of world cinema from its invention in the 1890’s to the early 1950’s, examining the production, distribution, and exhibition of narrative, documentary and experimental, among other forms of film. Gen. Ed. Categories: Fine Arts and Literature (A), Diversity [D].
Summer Session 1 – TBD, 3 credits

FLM 205: History of Film II
A survey of world cinema from the 1950’s to the present time, examining the production, distribution and exhibition of narrative, documentary and experimental among other forms of film. Gen. Ed. Categories: Fine Arts and Literature (A), Diversity [D].
Summer Session 2 – TBD, 3 credits

FRN 392: Nineteenth-Century Literature in Translation
Reading in translation of selected literary works from representative 19th-century authors. Not for major credit in French. Gen. Ed. Categories: Fine Arts and Literature (A), Letters (L), Foreign Language/Cross-cultural Competence (FC), Diversity [D].
Summer Session 2 – Karen De Bruin, 3 credits

FRN 393: Twentieth-Century Literature in Translation
Reading in translation of selected literary works from representative 20th-century authors. Not for major credit in French. Gen. Ed. Categories: Fine Arts and Literature (A), Letters (L), Foreign Language/Cross-cultural Competence (FC), Diversity [D].
Summer Session 1 – Karen De Bruin, 3 credits

GEG 202: Introductory Urban Geography: Understanding Cities
Introduction to urbanization processes, primarily in North America; national settlement systems; intra urban form; migration, racial, ethnic, gender, and class segregation; urban economics; environmental issues; planning and governance; urban applications of GIS. Gen. Ed. Category: Social Sciences (S), Diversity [D].
Summer Session 3 – Farhad Atash, 3 credits

GWS 150: Introduction to Gender and Women’s Studies
Images of women, the theories and processes of socialization, historical perspectives, and implications for social change. Service learning in some sections. Gen. Ed. Categories: Social Sciences (S), Diversity [D].
Summer Session 3 – TBD, 3 credits

GWS 315: Introduction to Feminist Theories and Methodologies
Development of feminist thought, exploration of contemporary feminist theories and research methods, including African-American, lesbian, Western and non-Western perspectives, and the future role of feminist theories and methodologies. Prereqs: GWS 150 or permission of instructor. Gen. Ed. Categories: Letters (L), Diversity [D].
Summer Session 3 – Donna Hughes, 3 credits

HDF 225: Consumer In The Economy
Application of basic economic principles to consumer problems in a complex marketplace, buyer-seller relationships, effective consumer decision making, effects of government policies on consumers. Gen. Ed. Categories: Social Sciences (S).
Summer Session 2 – Jing Jian Xiao, 3 credits.

KIN 123: Foundations of Health
Development of attitudes and practices that lead to more healthful living. Personal and community health problems studied. Gen. Ed. Categories: Social Sciences (S), Diversity [D].
Summer Session 3 – Allison Harper, 3 credits

LAR 201: Survey of Landscape Architecture
Introduction to landscape design theory and composition as an applied art form. Gen. Ed. Category: Fine Arts and Literature (A).
Summer Session 3 – Farhad Atash (two sections)

LET 151: Contemporary France
Study of the history of thought, of the search for values, of the attempt to define the human condition, as reflected in written texts, both past and present. May be repeated for credit with different topic. May be taken once for General Education credit. Gen. Ed. Category: Letters (L), Foreign Language/Cross-cultural Competence (FC), Diversity [D].
Summer Session 1 – Lars Erickson, 3 credits
Summer Session 2 – Lars Erickson, 3 credits – FULL!

LET 151: The European Union
Study of the history of thought, of the search for values, of the attempt to define the human condition, as reflected in written texts, both past and present. May be repeated for credit with different topic. May be taken once for General Education credit. Gen. Ed. Category: Letters (L), Foreign Language/Cross-cultural Competence (FC), Diversity [D].
Summer Session 1 – Norbert Hedderich, 3 credits
Summer Session 2 – Norbert Hedderich, 3 credits

LIB 120: Introduction to Information Literacy
In-depth exploration and practice of information literacy skills designed to support college-level research and lifelong learning. Gen. Ed. Category: English Communication (EC).
Summer Session 3 – James Kinnie, 3 credits

LIB 220: Issues of the Information Age
Critical current issues concerning the use of information are examined. Emphasis placed on the interdisciplinary nature of information and the use of research techniques as a foundation for informed citizenship. Gen. Ed. Category: English Communication (EC), Letters (L).
Summer Session 3 – Mary Macdonald, 3 credits

MIC 190: Issues in Biotechnology
Introduction to modern biotechnology in medical, pharmaceutical, forensic, agricultural, marine, and environmental applications. Consideration of ethical, environmental, health, and social issues. Gen. Ed. Category: Natural Science (N).
Summer Session 3 – TBD, 3 credits

MTH 108: Topics in Mathematics
Introduces the nonmathematics student to the spirit of mathematics and its applications. Presupposes no mathematical background beyond University admission requirements. Emphasis is on development of reasoning ability as well as manipulative techniques. Prereqs: passing a placement test. Not open to students with credit in MTH 106 or MTH 109 and not for major credit in mathematics. Gen. Ed. Category: Mathematical and Quantitative Reasoning (MQ).
Summer Session 1 – James Baglama, 3 credits

MTH 131: Applied Calculus I
Basic topics in calculus for students who do not need all the topics in 141. Limits, derivatives, and integrals of algebraic, logarithmic, and exponential functions. Applications including graphing, maxima and minima problems, etc. Prereqs: passing a placement test or C- or better in MTH 111. Not for major credit in mathematics. Not open to students with credit or concurrent enrollment in 141. Gen. Ed. Category: Mathematical and Quantitative Reasoning (MQ).
Summer Session 1 – Li Wu (two sections), 3 credits

MUS 101: Introduction to Music
Fosters a better understanding and appreciation of the world’s great music. Consideration of musical styles, techniques, and forms from the listener’s standpoint. Gen. Ed. Categories: Fine Arts and Literature (A), Diversity [D].
Summer Session 1 – Susan Thomas (two sections), 3 credits

MUS 106: History of Jazz
The nature and origin of jazz and its development as an American folk idiom: European and African heritages, blues, ragtime, dixieland, boogie-woogie, swing, bop, cool, funky, gospel, jazz-rock, free-form, and progressive. Gen. Ed. Categories: Fine Arts and Literature (A), Diversity [D].
Summer Session 1 – Jared Sims, 3 credits
Summer Session 2 – Jared Sims, 3 credits

MUS 111: Basic Musicianship
Use of folk, classical, and popular music to learn essentials of music reading and music theory. Gen. Ed. Category: Fine Arts and Literature (A).
Summer Session 1 – Eliane Aberdam, 3 credits
Summer Session 2 – Eliane Aberdam, 3 credits

NUR 150: Human Sexuality
Interdisciplinary approach to the study of individual and societal determinants in the development, integration, and expression of human sexuality and a code of sexual behavior. Gen. Ed. Category: Social Sciences (S), Diversity [D].
Summer Session 1 – Tiffani Kisler, 3 credits

NRS 190: Issues in Biotechnology
Introduction to modern biotechnology in medical, pharmaceutical, forensic, agricultural, marine, and environmental applications. Consideration of ethical, environmental, health, and social issues. Gen. Ed. Category: Natural Science (N).
Summer Session 3 – TBD, 3 credits

PHL 101: Critical Thinking
Identification, formulation and evaluation of both inductive and deductive patterns of reasoning. Consideration of topics such as probability, reasoning about causes, fallacies, foundations of argument, and the issues in logical theory. Gen. Ed. Categories: English Communication (EC), Letters (L).
Summer Session 3 – William Krieger (two sections), 3 credits

PHL 103: Introduction to Philosophy
Pursues such basic questions as: What is a person? What is knowledge? Are we free? What is moral right and wrong? Does God exist? What is the meaning of death? Not open to students with 9 or more credits in philosophy. Gen. Ed. Category: Letters (L)
Summer Session 3 – Bethany Vaccaro, 3 credits

PHL 217: Social Philosophy
A systematic introduction to the philosophical problems of contemporary social relations: models of community, sources of alienation, property and ownership, the meaning of work and technology, human rights and freedom. Gen. Ed. Category: Letters (L), Diversity [D].
Summer Session 3 – Zahra Meghani, 3 credits

PHL 314: Ethical Problems in Society and Medicine
Ethical analysis of topics such as war, capital punishment, sexual morality, suicide, animal rights, honesty and deception, world hunger, discrimination, abortion. Prereqs: PHL 101 or 103 or one 200-level PHL course or permission of instructor. Gen. Ed. Category: Letters (L)
Summer Session 3 – Zahra Meghani, 3 credits

PLS 190: Issues in Biotechnology
Introduction to modern biotechnology in medical, pharmaceutical, forensic, agricultural, marine, and environmental applications. Consideration of ethical, environmental, health, and social issues. Gen. Ed. Category: Natural Science (N).
Summer Session 3 – TBD, 3 credits

PSY 103: Towards Self-Understanding
Individual and social problems of normal persons. Personality development, social behavior, and adjustment reactions with emphasis on increasing awareness of personal and interpersonal functioning. Gen. Ed. Categories: Social Sciences (S), Diversity [D].
Summer Session 3 – TBD, 3 credits

PSY 255: Health Psychology
Investigates the relationship between behavior and health; emphasizes the theory and science of health behavior change; explores specific behaviors and behavior change strategies from an individual and public health perspective. Gen. Ed. Categories: Social Sciences(S), Diversity [D].
Summer Session 3 – TBD, 3 credits

PSY 310: History and Systems of Psychology
Origins of psychological inquiry and theories of psychology. Transformations of theories and methods of inquiry through the history of our culture including contemporary systems and models of psychological functioning. Prereqs: PSY 113. Gen. Ed. Category: Letters (L).
Summer Session 3 – TBD, 3 credits

SOC 230: Crime and Delinquency
Survey of the extent, distribution, trends and costs of delinquency and crime in the United States; examination of selected types of crime and delinquency; policy implications. Gen. Ed. Category: Social Sciences (S), Diversity [D].
Summer Session 1 – Barbara Costello, 3 credits
Summer Session 2 – Judy Van Wyk, 3 credits

WRT 227: Business Communications
Basic business communications forms, group reports and presentations, effective use of electronic mail systems, and design of graphic aids for successful visual communication. Prereqs: Open to Business majors with sophomore or higher standing. Open to a limited number of writing majors with sophomore or higher standing. Gen. Ed. Category: English Communication (ECw).
Summer Session 3 – TBD, 3 credits

WRT 235: Writing in Electronic Environments
Examine, investigate, and practice digital writing. May include web design, blogs, wikis, social networking technologies, presentation software, and construction of a digital portfolio. Requires out-of-class technology practice. Gen. Ed. Category: English Communication (ECw).
Summer Session 3 – TBD, 4 credits

WRT 302: Writing Culture
Experience with writings that sustain or reshape culture. May include profiles, reviews, food and fashion writing, liner and exhibition notes. Requires sustained fieldwork and out-of-class technology practice. Gen. Ed. Category: English Communication (ECw).
Summer Session 3 – TBD, 4 credits

WRT 303: Public Writing
Writing in the public sphere, emphasizing civic literacy, democratic discourse, and writing for change. May include letters, public documents, activist publications, and legislative texts. Requires sustained fieldwork. Gen. Ed. Category: English Communication (ECw).
Summer Session 3 – TBD, 4 credits

WRT 305 – Travel Writing
Writing about places both new and familiar. Emphasizes descriptive techniques, the use of facts, and different cultural perspectives. May include travel essays, place journals, guide-books, query letters. Requires sustained fieldwork. Gen. Ed. Categories: English Communication (ECw), Diversity [D].
Summer Session 3 – TBD, 4 credits

 

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Major-Specific Courses

AAF 202: Introduction to Afro-American Culture
Interdisciplinary survey of the social origins of Afro-American culture.
Summer Session 1 – Norman Barber, 3 credits
Summer Session 2 – Earline Ferguson, 3 credits

AAF 399: Introduction to Multicultural Psychology
Introductory course focusing on multiculturalism as a major paradigm. Emphasizes the meaning of multiculturalism and associated principles, concepts, and sociocultural factors as related to assessment, intervention, and research. Prereqs: PSY 113 or PSY 103.
Summer Session 3 – TBD, 3 credits

BUS 110: Business Computing Applications
Applications, concepts, and skills relevant to information technology in the context of the modern business environment. Topics include word processing, spreadsheet, presentation, and internet software. Prereq: open to students with a BU code or permission of the CBA dean’s office.
Summer Session 3 – Stuart Westin, 3 credits

BUS 341: Organizational Behavior
Introduction to organizational behavior; theory of human relations in industry; individual and group dynamics as well as motivational theories applied to current business issues, international business, and technological changes. Prereq: Junior standing in a degree-granting college.
Summer Session 3 – Aimee Lee, 3 credits – FULL!

BUS 342: Human Resources Management
Role of the personnel department in an organization. Employer-employee problems at various internal levels and their impact on the organization and its environment. Covers such areas as manpower planning, the recruitment process, training, employee relations, pension planning, and occupational safety in the public and private sectors. Cases and lectures. Prereqs: BUS 340 recommended, junior standing in a degree granting college.
Summer Session 3 – Aimee Lee, 3 credits

BUS 355: Operations and Supply Chain Management
Operations management problems in global and domestic environments. Operations strategy, service, and manufacturing; forecasting; inventory management; production and material requirements planning; scheduling; just-in-time; and quality management. Prereqs: BUS 110 or CSC 101, BUS 210 or STA 308, and junior standing in a degree granting college or permission of instructor.
Summer Session 3 – Dara Schiederjans, 3 credits

COM 210: Persuasion: The Rhetoric of Influence
Analysis of communication influencing beliefs, attitudes, and/or behavior. Investigation of rhetorical elements of logical, emotional, and ethical appeals. Study of elements critical for effective producers and consumers of persuasion. Prereqs: COM 100 or 100H or 110.
Summer Session 3 – Yinjiao Ye, 3 credits

COM 221: Interpersonal Communication
Examines basic theory and skills, including impart of perception, self-concept, listening, nonverbal messages, and language on interpersonal communication, including conflict, relationship development, friendship, family and romantic relationships. Prereqs: COM 100 or 100H or 110.
Summer Session 1 – Vincent Petronio, 3 credits

COM 251: Small Group Communication
The study of communicative functions in the small group setting. Includes group dynamics, leadership, problem solving, and decision making. Emphasis on theory and application. Prereqs: COM 100 or 100H or 110.
Summer Session 3 – Abran Salazar, 3 credits

COM 310: Topics in Communication
Analysis of contemporary rhetorical theories as they relate to speaking in business, civil rights, education, government, labor, law, and religion. Focus each semester on a critical contemporary issue. Some topics are offered online. Pre: junior standing in a degree-granting college or permission of instructor. May be repeated for credit.
Summer Session 1 – Joanne Mundorf, 3 credits – FULL!

COM 322: Gender and Communication
Survey of theories and research on gender and communication. Examines interface of gender and human interaction in interpersonal, group (including family), educational, organizational, mass media, and social movement contexts. Prereqs: junior standing in a degree-granting college or permission of instructor.
Summer Session 1 – Kathleen Torrens, 3 credits – FULL!

COM 326: Family Communication
Examines family communication from a symbolic interaction and systems theory perspective. Focuses on primary family functions including cohesion, and case studies. Prereqs: COM 202 and 221 and junior standing in a degree-granting college or permission of instructor.
Summer Session 3 – Rachel Dicioccio, 3 credits

COM 354: International Business Communications Exchange
Examination of effective international business communication. Use of worldwide email network to exchange views on business topics with counterparts abroad. Prereqs: junior standing in a degree-granting college or permission of instructor.
Summer Session 1 – Norbert Mundorf, 3 credits

COM 361: Intercultural Communication
Study of cultural similarities and differences as they affect communication within and across cultural boundaries. Prereqs: Junior standing in a degree-granting college or permission of instructor.
Summer Session 1 – Joanne Mundorf, 3 credits

COM 381: Research Methods in Communication
Basic concepts and techniques of communication research. Emphasis on analysis of existing communication research and on application of research processes to communication problems or phenomena. Prereqs: COM 202 and junior standing in a degree-granting college or permission of instructor.
Summer Session 1 – Norbert Mundorf, 3 credits – FULL!

COM 382: Communication Theory
A critical survey of social science based communication theories; an examination of the nature, processes and functions of communication theory in a variety of contexts. Prereqs: COM 100, COM 202 or COM 221 and junior standing in a degree-granting college or permission of instructor.
Summer Session 3 – Abran Salazar, 3 credits

COM 383: Rhetorical Theory
Surveys and analyzes rhetorical communication theories and theorists from classical to contemporary times and focuses on rhetoric’s relationship with philosophy, knowledge, reason, science, technology, and culture. Prereqs: junior standing in a degree-granting college or permission of instructor. COM 202, and COM 221 or COM 210 recommended.
Summer Session 3 – Kevin McClure, 3 credits

COM 414: The Rhetoric of Sports in Film
Studies the rhetoric of sports in film. Students identify and analyze rhetorical messages embedded in films that deal with sports as reflections of the filmmaker’s vision by applying film and rhetorical theory. Prereqs: COM 381 and 383 and junior standing in a degree-granting college or permission of instructor. Not for graduate credit.
Summer Session 3 – Stephen Wood, 3 credits – FULL!

COM 415: The Ethics of Persuasion
Relation of persuasion to ethics is examined. Purposes, means, results, and contexts are considered in making rhetorical judgments of interpersonal, political, and institutional communication. Prereqs: junior standing in a degree-granting college or permission of instructor.
Summer Session 3 – Stephen Wood, 3 credits – FULL!

COM 461: Managing Cultural Differences in Organizations
Exploring how to manage cultural differences in organizations and to adapt to culturally diverse organizations by applying the skills of intercultural sensitivity and intercultural competence. Prereqs: junior standing in a degree-granting college or permission of instructor. Not open to students who have credit for BUS 448, MBA 579.
Summer Session 3 – Guo-Ming Chen, 3 credits

CSC 200: Computer Problem Solving For Science and Engineering
An integrated symbolic, numerical, and graphical approach to computer problem solving. Structured design; fundamental programming techniques. Computer algebra systems. Scientific, engineering, and mathematical applications. Prereqs: credit or concurrent enrollment in MTH 131 or 141. Not for major credit in computer science. May not be taken for credit by students with credit in CSC 201 or 211.
Summer Session 2 – Gerard Baudet, 4 credits

CSC 301: Fundamentals of Programming Languages
Organization of programming languages, data and control structures, syntax and semantics, compilers and interpreters. Block structured languages, recursion, parameter passing, run-time storage management. Procedural, functional, object-oriented, and logical languages. Prereqs: CSC 212.
Summer Session 1 – Suzanne Mello-Stark, 4 credits

CSF 102: Fundamentals for Cyber Security
This course provides an overview of the technical background required to provide solutions to many cyber security problems. This background includes: binary/hex number systems, operating systems concepts, file systems, OSI model, network topologies and protocols, and wireless standards and implementations.
Summer Session 2 – TBD, 4 credits

ECN 305: Competing Traditions in Economics
Introductory exposure to the history of economic thought and also to competing schools of thought within modern economics. Connections between present-day controversies and competing traditions are explored. Prereqs: ECN 201, 202. May be taken concurrently with 202.
Summer Session 2 – Robert Van Horn (two sections), 3 credits

ENG 205A: Creative Writing: Poetry
Writing and analysis of works written by class members and professional writers. Students may repeat ENG 205 for a total of 16 credits but may not repeat the same letter (A, B, C, D).
Summer Session 3 – TBD, 4 credits

ENG 205B: Creative Writing: Fiction
The teaching of creative writing is, in terms of the history of human narrative, a very recent development indeed. People have been writing stories, tales, plays, and poems for many thousands of years — but the idea that such activities could be taught in a college setting is not even a century old. It’s still evolving, and there’s no one method, or fixed course of study, that works for everyone. Here in this online class, I’ll do my very best to find the method and approach that’s best for each of you, and help guide you to the kinds of processes, strategies, and goals that fit best with your work, whatever its genre or form. You can expect regular, careful feedback on your writing, and guidance and support as you pursue your own creative goals.
Russell A. Potter is the author of the novel PYG: The Memoirs of Toby, the Learned Pig (Penguin Books); his essays and short stories have appeared in The New Orleans Review, Gingerbread House, Remarkable Doorways, and The Ocean State Review. Students may repeat ENG 205 for a total of 16 credits but may not repeat the same letter (A, B, C, D).
Summer Session 3 – Russell A. Potter, 4 credits

ENG 205D: Creative Writing: Screenwriting
Writing and analysis of works written by class members and professional writers. (Lec. 3) ENG 205D may
be offered online. Students may repeat ENG 205 for a total of 16 credits but may not repeat the same letter (A, B, C, D).
Summer Session 3 – TBD, 4 credits

ENG 305B: Advanced Creative Writing – Fiction
Intensive writing and reading workshop for students at the advanced level who have preferably taken at least one previous class in creative writing. Student may repeat ENG 305 for a total of 16 credits but may not repeat the same letter (A, B, C, D).
Summer Session 3 – TBD, 4 credits

FLM 351: Low-Tech Cinema
Application of one or more production technologies in film media genres and analysis of their aesthetic implications. Prereqs: sophomore standing or permission of instructor. FLM 110 or video or filmmaking course from ART, COM, or JOR recommended. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits with permission of the director and change of topic.
Summer Session 1 – Reshad Kulenovic, 4 credits

FLM 352: You Tube Film: Mashups, Mixes, Etc.
Critical examination of historical, theoretical and aesthetic topics in world cinema. Prereqs: sophomore standing or permission of instructor. FLM 101, 204 or 205 recommended. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits with permission of the director and change of topic.
Summer Session 1 – TBD, 4 credits

FRN 412: Topics in French Culture and Literature
Topics in French literature and culture. Prereqs: FRN 309 or 310 or permission of instructor. May be taken more than once for credit on different topics.
Summer Session 2 – Karen De Bruin, 3 credits

GWS 301: Women’s Professional Development and Leadership
Theory, data and skill development for career building and leadership. Gender issues in organizational settings, developing professional skills and responses to challenges in the workplace, and strategies for positive change.
Summer Session 3 – Aimee Lee, 3 credits

GWS 350: Special Topics in Women’s Studies
Selected areas of study pertinent to women’s studies. Instruction may be offered in class seminar or tutorial environments according to specific needs and purposes. Topics include “Media Images of Women,” “Narrative of the Witch,” “Women and Aging,” “Women and Health,” “Women and the Law,” “Women and Music,” “Women and Religion,” “Women and Business Culture,” and “Women in Islam.” Some topics may be offered online. May be repeated with different topic.
Summer Session 2 – TBD, 3 credits

GWS 360: Men and Masculinities
Examines from a feminist perspective, the values, beliefs, myths, realities, research and writings about men and masculinities in contemporary United State life. Prereqs: WMS 150.
Summer Sessions 3 – TBD, 3 credits

GWS 370: Sex Trafficking
Focuses on the commercial sexual exploitation and slavery of women and girls and the impact on their health, rights, and status in society. Prereqs: GWS 150 or permission of instructor.
Summer Session 3 – Donna Hughes, 3 credits.

HDF 205: Family Financial Issues Across the Life Span
Introduction to financial issues faced by families and individuals at each stage of the life cycle from different income levels, family types and cultural backgrounds.
Summer Session 1 – Nilton Porto, 3 credits

HDF 230: Marriage and Family Relationships
Male-female and other close relationships in courtship and family systems as influenced by personality and culture in a changing society. Professional and functional orientation.
Summer Session 1 – Jerome Adams, 3 credits

HDF 428: Consumer Protection
Effectiveness of diverse approaches to consumer protection. Analysis of techniques such as information disclosure, standards for products and services, government and private agencies, redress channels, and legislation. Prereqs: HDF 205 or 225 or permission of instructor.
Summer Session 2 – Jing Jian Xiao, 3 credits

KIN 275: Introduction to Exercise Science
Introduction to the field of exercise science. Principles of exercise, components of health-related physical fitness, weight management, and basic exercise prescription.
Summer Session 3 – Disa Hatfield, 3 credits

NVP 425: Peace Psychology
Peace psychology combines aspects of cognitive, social, clinical and cross-cultural psychology that bear on the prevention of violence and the promotion of constructive nonviolent behavior. Prereqs: Prior coursework in psychology, or permission of instructor. Prior coursework in another social science is recommended.
Summer Session 3 – TBD, 3 credits

PSC 300: Challenge of Nuclear Arms
Nuclear weapons addressed from a range of perspectives. Emphasis on the strategic, political, social, and moral issues and controversies raised by the potential for nuclear war. Prereqs: 3 credits in the social sciences recommended or permission of instructor.
Summer Session 3 – Kristin Johnson (two sections), 4 credits

PSY 399: Introduction to Multicultural Psychology
Introductory course focusing on multiculturalism as a major paradigm. Emphasizes the meaning of multiculturalism and associated principles, concepts, and sociocultural factors as related to assessment, intervention, and research. Pre: PSY 113 or 103.
Summer Session 3 – TBD, 3 credits

PSY 425: Peace Psychology
Peace psychology combines aspects of cognitive, social, clinical and cross-cultural psychology that bear on the prevention of violence and the promotion of constructive nonviolent behavior. Prereqs: Prior coursework in psychology, or permission of instructor. Prior coursework in another social science is recommended.
Summer Session 3 – TBD, 3 credits

PSY 480: Psychology of Women
Discussion of psychological research and theories on the psychology of girls and women from a multicultural perspective. Topics include personality theories, gender similarities and differences, biological aspects of sex and gender, cultural images of women, sexuality, relationships, motherhood, work and achievement, physical and mental health. Prereqs: PSY 113 and at least one 200-level psychology course.
Summer Session 3 – TBD, 3 credits

SOC 274: Criminal Justice System
The American system of criminal justice, general processing of cases, principal actors, study of theories of criminal law, and pretrial detention and sentencing.
Summer Session 2 – Leo Carroll, 3 credits

TMD 222: Apparel Production
Analysis of apparel construction and production; current industrial and technological developments. Discussion of sizing and quality standards with emphasis on identification of fabrics, garment styles, findings, and trims. Prereqs: TMD 103.
Summer Session 2 – Susan Hannel, 3 credits

TMD 232: Fashion Retailing
A comprehensive study of fashion retailing as an operating system. Examination of the strategies and the organizational structure that support the fashion retail system.
Summer Session 3 – Yvette Harps-Logan, 3 credits

TMD 240: Development of Contemporary Fashion
History of contemporary fashion from the beginning of the 20th century to the present. Influence of designers, buyers, consumers, and technology on fashion in the marketplace. Prereqs: TMD 103, 126, and sophomore standing.
Summer Session 3 – Linda Welters, 3 credits

TMD 433: Textile Markets
Study of social, economic, and political issues that affect the development, production, and marketing of textile products. Study of the textile needs of the apparel, home furnishings, industrial, and medical industries. Prereqs: TMD 303 and ECN 201 and 202.
Summer Session 3 – Sheng Lu, 3 credits – FULL!

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Major & Career Development Courses

ITR 300: Career Planning: Concepts and Skills
Identify personal strengths, interests, and professional values related to career exploration. Develop professional job and internship search skills. Prereqs: sophomore standing; NOT for BUS or Wanting BUS students.
Alternate Session (see eCampus for dates) – John Rooney (two sections), 1-3 credits

ITR 301: Field Experience I
Field experience gained at placement site through participation in the ITR program. The experience will be defined by a job description and learning contract arranged by the ITR director between the student intern, the intern’s faculty advisor, and the relevant agency supervisor. Prereqs: junior or senior standing, a minimum quality point average of 2.50, participation in the ITR program, and permission of faculty advisor. May be repeated for a maximum of 24 credits. For registration information, please call 401.874.2311.
Alternate Session (see eCampus for dates) – Instructor to be assigned (2 sections), 3-12 credits

ITR 302: Field Experience II
Field experience gained at placement site through participation in the ITR program. The experience will be defined by a job description and learning contract arranged by the ITR director between the student intern, the intern’s faculty advisor, and the relevant agency supervisor. Prereqs: junior or senior standing, a minimum quality point average of 2.50, participation in the ITR program, and permission of faculty advisor. May be repeated for a maximum of 24 credits. For registration information, please call 401.874.2311.
Alternate Session (see eCampus for dates) – Instructor to be assigned (4 sections available), 3-12 credits

ITR 303: Colloquium I
Seminar format. Discussions of issues and problems raised by internship experiences in public service agencies. Prereqs: concurrent enrollment in 301 for 303. Required for and open only to students enrolled in the ITR program. For registration information, please call 401.874.2311.
Alternate Session (see eCampus for dates) – Instructor to be assigned (2 sections available), 3 credits

ITR 304: Colloquium II
Seminar format. Discussions of issues and problems raised by internship experiences in public service agencies. Prereqs: concurrent enrollment in 302 for 304. Required for and open only to students enrolled in the ITR program. For registration information, please call 401.874.2311.
Alternate Session (see eCampus for dates) – Instructor to be assigned (6 sections available), 3 credits

UCS 270: Academic and Career Decisions
Individualized approach to career concerns, skill identification, self-awareness, career development theory, decision making. Emphasis on understanding long- and short-term goals.
Summer Session 1 – John Rooney, 1-3 credits
Summer Session 2 – John Rooney, 1-3 credits

 

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Graduate Courses

LSC 502: Lead, Manage & Connect Library and Information Services
Apply professional values, ethics, principles, theories, and problem-solving to present and future library and information services (LIS). Plan, lead, manage, and connect LIS with transformational leadership in diverse communities.
Summer Session 3 – TBD, 3 credits

LSC 505: Organization of Information
Theory and practice of organizing information following national and international standards; focus on bibliographic information. Emphasizes the understanding and application of cataloging and classification principles, standards, tools, bibliographic utilities and networks. Prereq: Graduate standing.
Summer Session 3 – Yan Ma, 3 credits

LSC 525: Multiculturalism in Libraries
Determining information needs and planning library collections, services, and programs for diverse populations. Historical, philosophical, and comparative aspects of multiculturalism in libraries will also be considered. Prereqs: LSC 504 or permission of instructor.
Summer Session 3 – Yan Ma, 3 credits

LSC 527: Digital Information Literacy Instruction
Design and teach digital and information literacy skills to diverse library users to promote effective and ethical use of digital and information resources in a variety of library settings. Pre: LSC 504 or permission of instructor.
Summer Session 3 – TBD, 3 credits

LSC 530: Texts & E-Tools for Tots to Teens
Select, evaluate, and promote the use of print, media, and digital resources for diverse populations by ensuring and mediating access to library resources and e-resources beyond collections.
Summer Session 3 – TBD, 3 credits

MBA 502: Organizational Behavior
Examination of the theory, research, and practice of organizational behavior in work settings, focusing on individual differences, communications, group dynamics, motivation, and leadership in the workplace. Cannot be taken for credit if student has already taken MBA 532.
Summer Session 3 – Roy Twaddle, 3 credits

MBA 504: Financial Management
Functions and responsibilities of financial managers. Examination of: financial statement analysis, cost of capital, capital structure, valuation, markets, capital budgeting, working capital, mergers, bankruptcy, multinational finance. Prereqs: MBA 500, 503 or 533, and ECN 590. Cannot be taken for credit if student has already taken MBA 534.
Summer Session 3 – Bing-Xuan Lin, 3 credits

MBA 550: Managing with Information Resources
Concepts of information technologies and systems as they relate to the information-age organization. Major focus is on how the various information resources can be managed to facilitate organizational effectiveness. Topics include information and communication technologies, decision support and information systems, technology-enabled process re-engineering, and information architecture. Prereqs: permission of instructor. Cannot be taken for credit if student has already taken MBA 532.
Summer Session 3 – Bjorn Carlsson, 3 credits – FULL!

NUR 535: Advanced Pathophysiology
An in-depth study of pathophysiological phenomena across the life span from the biological life processes perspective. Clinical decision making based on the synthesis of this knowledge and current research findings will be explored. Prereqs: for nursing students: admission to graduate program in nursing or permission of instructor; PHT 500 and 1st year standing in the D.P.T. program for physical therapy students.
Summer Session 3 – Denise Coppa, 3 credits

NUR 680: Informatics in Health Care Settings
Theory and application of nursing science, computer science and information science for decision making, practice management and communication in health care settings. Prereqs: D.N.P. enrollment or permission of instructor.
Summer Session 3 – Patricia Schwirian, 3 credits

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