Research and Extension Projects

 

Best Vegetable Cultivars for Local Market Production

Season-Extending Production Methods

Pest Management Strategies

We test new and experimental vegetable varieties for adaptation to southern New England, response to diseases and insects, and suitability for intensive production. Species and market classes trialed change from year to year in response to interest from seed companies and growers. Trials are conducted using IPM and sustainable methods.
We test new and experimental vegetable varieties for adaptation to southern New England, response to diseases and insects, and suitability for intensive production. Species and market classes trialed change from year to year in response to interest from seed companies and growers. Trials are conducted using IPM and sustainable methods.
Consumers have become accustomed to year-round availability of produce, so season extension is an important part of growing vegetables for local markets. Extending the season helps growers increase farm income and customer loyalty. We work to develop and demonstrate best practices for season extension using high tunnels, row covers, and other techniques.
Consumers have become accustomed to year-round availability of produce, so season extension is an important part of growing vegetables for local markets. Extending the season helps growers increase farm income and customer loyalty. We work to develop and demonstrate best practices for season extension using high tunnels, row covers, and other techniques.
Insects, microbes, weeds, birds, and rodents are important parts of the ecosystem, but they can also cause significant problems for farmers. Integrated pest management, minimal risk pesticides, and physical barriers are important tools for protecting crops.
Insects, microbes, weeds, birds, and rodents are important parts of the ecosystem, but they can also cause significant problems for farmers. Integrated pest management, minimal risk pesticides, and physical barriers are important tools for protecting crops.

Improvements to Soil Health

Urban Agriculture

Archived Projects and Trial Results

Insects, microbes, weeds, birds, and rodents are important parts of the ecosystem, but they can also cause significant problems for farmers. Integrated pest management, minimal risk pesticides, and physical barriers are important tools for protecting crops.
Insects, microbes, weeds, birds, and rodents are important parts of the ecosystem, but they can also cause significant problems for farmers. Integrated pest management, minimal risk pesticides, and physical barriers are important tools for protecting crops.
Urban farms and gardens enhance the quality of city life. They provide residents with fresh, local, and culturally appropriate food, strengthen social networks, and conserve biodiversity. Urban gardeners and farmers, however, face unique challenges, including limited access to land and soil contamination. Our research seeks to address these challenges by identifying  best management practices for smaller scale urban and suburban production systems.
Urban farms and gardens enhance the quality of city life. They provide residents with fresh, local, and culturally appropriate food, strengthen social networks, and conserve biodiversity. Urban gardeners and farmers, however, face unique challenges, including limited access to land and soil contamination. Our research seeks to address these challenges by identifying best management practices for smaller scale urban and suburban production systems.
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Think Big We Do

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