College of Pharmacy

7 Greenhouse Road Kingston, RI 02881

pharmcol@etal.uri.edu – Office: 401.874.2761 Fax: 401.874.2181

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Office of Continuing Professional Development

32nd Annual Seminar by the Sea

Northeast Regional
Continuing Education Conference for Pharmacists

Targeted Practice: Tailored Approaches,
Specialty Drugs, and the
Expanding Role of Pharmacy

 March 15 – March 17, 2017

Gurney’s Newport Resort and Marina (Formerly the Hyatt Regency Newport Hotel), 1 Goat Island, Newport RI 02840

Pre-Conference Sessions: Wednesday, March 15, 2017

PRECEPTOR TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT WORKSHOP

Schedule

12:00 pm – 1:00 pm       Preceptor Networking Luncheon, Acquidneck Room

1:00 pm – 1:30 pm         Update for Preceptors: Standards and Practices, Newport Room

1:30 pm – 3:00 pm         “Dressed for Success: Using Learning Styles to Improve the Look of Your Rotation!”

3:00 pm – 4:00 pm         Preceptor Focus Group

 

Description

Interacting with trainees based on their learning styles is a critical component of the learning process that affects the learner’s ability to retain information and enjoy rotation activities. Making slight modifications to the rotation may maximize the learning potential of the trainee and decrease frustration by the preceptor. During this activity, faculty will provide preceptors with learning and behavior assessment tools to determine the most appropriate teaching methods for various types of learning styles and learners at different levels.

 

Learning Objectives

Upon completion of this application-based learning activity, participants will be able to:

  • Apply evidence based learning and behavioral assessment tools to assess trainees’ learning styles.
  • Describe strategies for managing learners at different levels.
  • Plan activities for different types of learners on the same rotation.
  • Identify two assessment tools that can help you quickly assess your trainees’ learning style; Choose teaching approaches based on learning style preferences
  • Describe strategies for managing multiple learning styles within a rotation

 

Target Audience

The University of Rhode Island College of Pharmacy New Student Preceptors, New Residency Preceptors, Experienced Student Preceptors, Experienced Residency Preceptors and those pharmacists interested in becoming a preceptor.

 

Faculty

Kerri E. Degenkolb, Pharm.D., BCPS, Residency Program Director, Eskenazi Health, Indianapolis, IN

Chris Degenkolb, PharmD, BCPS, Clinical Pharmacy Specialist, Internal Medicine and PGY2 Internal Medicine Residency Program Director, VA Medical Center, Indianapolis, IN

Brett Feret, PharmD, Clinical Associate Professor and Director, Experiential Education, The University of Rhode Island College of Pharmacy.

Deborah L Mathews, Director, Center for Human Services and Director, Community and Business Engagement, Office of Strategic Initiatives, University of Rhode Island Alan Shawn Feinstein College of Education & Professional Studies

 

 

ANTIMICROBIAL STEWARDSHIP IN GERIATRIC AND LONG TERM CARE POPULATIONS

Presented by the University of Rhode Island (URI) College of Pharmacy in collaboration with the Rhode Island Department of Health, Healthcentric Advisors, Brown University’s School of Public Health and Warren Alpert School of Medicine and the URI Academic Health Collaborative

 

Schedule

7:30 am – 8:30 am              Registration & Continental Breakfast, Grand Ballroom
8:30 am – 12:30 pm            Antimicrobial Stewardship in Geriatric and Long-Term Care Populations,
Grand Ballroom

Background

Antibiotic misuse is a serious patient safety concern and a national public health priority. Years of indiscriminant antibiotic use have promoted selection for antibiotic resistant bacteria, Clostridium difficile infection, and poor patient outcomes. While organized programs to improve antibiotic use, known as antimicrobial stewardship (AMS), are common in acute care, one setting that has been largely overlooked is long-term care. This is concerning as 70% of residents receive one or more courses of antibiotics each year and up to 75% of antibiotic use in long-term care facilities (LTCFs) is inappropriate or unnecessary according to the Centers for Diseases Control and Prevention (CDC).

In September 2015, the CDC released formal AMS recommendations for LTCFs, which refer to a set of commitments and actions designed to ensure that residents receive the right antibiotic, at the right dose, for the right amount of time, and only when necessary. Due to recent requirements issued by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) for antimicrobial stewardship in long term care facilities that participate in the Medicare and Medicaid programs, there is increasing interest in the development, implementation and education of antimicrobial stewardship.

Goals

The Rhode Island Department of Health in conjunction with Healthcentric Advisors, a Medicare Quality Improvement Organization, has been focused on the development and implementation of an AMS educational program.  The goal for this program is to provide infectious diseases based education for providers, pharmacists and nurses that have interest in improving antibiotic use in LTCFs.  Participants in this program will receive an AMS toolkit including access to comprehensive antibiotic usage guidance and pathways for common infections in geriatric and LTC populations.

Target Audience

Physicians, physician assistants (PA), nurse practitioners, nurses and pharmacists in LTCFs and other interested health care providers. This session (only) offers CE for pharmacists, nurses, and physicians. PAs will be provided the physician CME certificates.

Agenda

7:30 am            Registration & Continental Breakfast, Grand Ballroom

8:30 am             Welcome and Introduction: Kerry LaPlante, PharmD and David Dosa, MD

8:45 am            Infectious Diseases and Microbiology: The Basics, Chet Cunha, MD

  • List the most common bacteria that transiently or persistently colonize human skin, colon and respiratory tract;
  • Classify the different types of pathogens and their resistance patterns that cause disease;
  • Discuss the importance of understanding antimicrobial resistance and how an antibiogram informs treatment.

9:25 am            Antibiotic Review – Soup to Nuts, Kerry LaPlante, PharmD, FCCP

  • Explain appropriate “bug-drug” matches to optimize antibiotic treatment selection;
  • Discuss the safety profile and monitoring needs of commonly used antibiotics in elderly and LTC populations;
  • Identify new and emerging therapies for multiple drug-resistant bacterial infections.

10: 15 am          Controversy, Colonization, & Criteria; Prevention & Management of Urinary Tract                                     Infections in Geriatrics and Long-Term Care, David Dosa, MD and Monica Dorobisz, PharmD

  • Differentiate Urinary Tract Infections (UTI) versus asymptomatic bacteriuria;
  • Describe the challenges related to the appropriate diagnosis of symptomatic UTI in elderly and LTC population;
  • Review the management of symptomatic UTI, catheter associated UTI and asymptomatic bacteriuria;
  • Discuss evidence related to agents used for the prevention of UTI and identify the role of these agents in LTC (including cranberry and ascorbic acid use);
  • Demonstrate the opportunities for antibiotic stewardship in LTC for improving the diagnosis and treatment of UTI.

11:00 am           BREAK

11:15 am           Treatment and Prevention of Common Respiratory Tract Infections in Geriatrics and
                         Long-Term Care, Stefan Gravenstein, MD

  • Review the symptoms and etiology of upper respiratory infections in the LTC population;
  • Discuss the challenges associated with the diagnosis and treatment of pneumonia specific to LTC residents;
  • Identify the most common bacterial causes of nursing home–associated pneumonia and risk factors for resistance;
  • Recommend appropriate empiric and targeted antibiotic treatment options for nursing home–associated pneumonia;
  • Describe the role for antibiotic stewardship in ensuring optimal management of respiratory tract infections in LTC;
  • Discuss the role of pneumococcal and influenza immunizations in preventing pneumonia in LTC residents.

11:55 am           Panel Presentations and Discussions: Meet the Leaders at the Antibiotic                                                          Stewardship Table: A Focus on Policy, Leadership and Legislation Updates Related
                         to Stewardship in Long-Term Care, Aman Nanda, MD, Rebecca Reece, MD and Sarah Hendrick, PharmD

  • Recognize the need for and barriers to antibiotic stewardship in LTC
  • Identify national initiatives to address antibiotic resistance and misuse in LTC
  • Review the CDC Core Elements for Antibiotic Stewardship in Nursing Homes
  • Discuss tools for implementing, monitoring, and sustaining antibiotic stewardship in LTC facilities
  • Describe new opportunities for health care professionals to advance stewardship in LTC facilities

12:30 pm           Adjournment

Faculty

Planning Committee, Course Coordinators and Content Leads:

Kerry LaPlante, PharmD, FCCP
Professor, College of Pharmacy
The University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI
Adjunct Professor of Medicine
Brown University, Providence, RI
Director of the Infectious Diseases Research Program and Infectious Diseases Pharmacotherapy Specialist, Providence Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Providence, RI

Haley Morrill, PharmD
Infectious Diseases Pharmacy Specialist Providence Veterans Affairs Medical Center Providence, RI

David Dosa, MD, MPh
Associate Professor of Medicine, Associate Professor of Health Services, Policy & Practice
Brown University, Providence, RI

Erica Estus, PharmD, CGP
Clinical Associate Professor
College of Pharmacy
The University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI.

Norma Owens, PharmD, FCCP, BCPS
Professor, College of Pharmacy
The University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI
Geriatric Clinical Pharmacy Consultant
Steere House, Providence, RI

 

Presenting Faculty:

 

Chet Cunha, MD
Assistant Professor of Medicine
Brown University Alpert School of Medicine
Medical Director, Antimicrobial Stewardship Program, Rhode Island Hospital and
The Miriam Hospital, Providence, RI

Monica Dorobisz, PharmD
Infectious Diseases Pharmacist and Chair
Kent Antimicrobial Stewardship Program
Kent Hospital, Warwick, RI

Stefan Gravenstein, MD, MPH
Director, Division of Geriatrics and Palliative Care
Department of Medicine
Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio

Sarah Hendrick, Pharm D
PGY1 Resident

Aman Nanda, MD
Associate Professor of Medicine
Program Director Geriatric Medicine Fellowship Program
The Warren Alpert Medical School
Brown University

Rebecca Reece, MD, DOH
Medical Consultant
Division of Preparedness, Response, Infectious Diseases, and Emergency Medical Services
Rhode Island Department of Health, Providence, RI

 

Accreditation

acpesmaller

The University of Rhode Island College of Pharmacy is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education as a provider of continuing pharmacy education.

 

Credit Designations

March 15, 2017 Preceptor Workshop

This is an application-based educational activity. Pharmacists will receive 2.0 contact hours (0.20 ceus) for the preceptor workshop. No partial credit will be given.

March 15, 2017 Antimicrobial Stewardship (AMS) Session

This is a knowledge-based educational activity. Pharmacists will receive 3.75 contact hours (0.375 ceus) for the AMS session. No partial credit will be given.

Healthcentric Advisors is accredited by the Massachusetts Medical Society to provide continuing medical education for physicians. Physicians will receive AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™ for the AMS session. Physician assistants will be presented with an AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™ certificate which can be provided to their respective licensing board to determine eligibility for credit. Nursing credit will be provided by NE-MSD (Northeast Multi-State Division).

 

Requirements for Credit

Participants must sign in each day. Participants will receive a participant code for each session and must complete program evaluations on the URI web site at www.uripharmacycpd.org. CE credit will be automatically uploaded to the CPE Monitor upon completion of the evaluation and posted to the participant’s NABP account within 72 hours. Credit will not be awarded to participants who complete the program evaluation more than 60 days post-activity.  CE statements and transcripts are available through your CPE Monitor account.

 

Universal Activity Numbers

Wednesday, March 15, 2017

Preceptor Workshop:         UAN 0060-0000-17-004-L04-P         2.00 Contact Hours                (0.200 ceus)

AMS Session:                   UAN 0060-0000-17-003-L01-P         3.75 Contact Hours              (0.375 ceus)

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