Nanotechnology and nanoscience

Tapping into the power of small particles

Researchers at the University of Rhode Island are developing “smart” nanoparticles capable of self-assembly and direction. Because the potential benefits of this technology are so far-reaching, they building interdisciplinary partnerships with colleagues across the University.

In the medical field, intelligent particles can be used as a drug delivery system for cancer patients. The particles will attack only cancerous cells and bypass healthy ones. Nanoparticles made of specific metal molecules also can detect complex medical conditions by latching onto cells and acting as beacons as physicians test for disease.

Chemical engineering Professor Arijit Bose and Associate Professor Geoffrey Bothun are leading teams to develop safer alternatives to oil dispersants used after a spill. Nanoscience may also hold the key to detecting pollutants in our environment. URI Researchers are studying micro- and nanoplastics and how they behave in in coastal environments. They are also in the early stages of developing a new sensing approach for detecting PFASs and other substances. Assistant professor, Yi Zheng, is using nanoscience to contribute to renewable energy technology by looking at nanoscale thermal transport and its relationship to solar energy harvesting and radiative cooling.

Our mission is to grow scientific knowledge and translate that into information, products or processes that benefit society. This can only be done through interdisciplinary collaboration.
Associate Professor, Geoffrey Bothun

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Faculty

Professor and Department Chair

Chemical Engineering

401.874.9518gbothun@uri.edu

Professor

Electrical, Computer & Biomedical Engineering

401.874.4738besio@uri.edu

Distinguished Engineering Professor

Chemical Engineering

401.874.2804bosea@uri.edu

Associate Professor

Civil and Environmental Engineering

401.874.5637sumanta_das@uri.edu

Assistant Professor

Mechanical, Industrial and Systems Engineering

401.874.4248ashgiri@uri.edu

Assistant Professor

Civil and Environmental Engineering

401.874.2889goodwill@uri.edu

Distinguished Engineering Professor

Chemical Engineering

401.874.2085ogregory@uri.edu

Assistant Professor

Mechanical, Industrial and Systems Engineering

401.874.4249yanglin@uri.edu

Associate Professor

Chemical Engineering

401.874.4303smeenach@uri.edu

Assistant Professor

Chemical Engineering

ryanps@uri.edu

Associate Professor

Chemical Engineering

401.874.2678roxbury@uri.edu

Simon Ostrach Professor

Mechanical, Industrial and Systems Engineering

401.874.2283shuklaa@uri.edu