Environmental and Natural Resource Economics B.S.

Curriculum

The degree requires a minimum of 120 credits, including 24 credits in concentration courses. In addition to satisfying the general education requirements, students need nine credits in introductory professional courses, including natural resource conservation (NRS 100), introduction to resource economics (EEC 105), and environmental economics and policy (EEC 205). The major also requires a minimum of three credits in written communication skills (WRT) at the 200 level or higher.

Option 1: Green Markets and Sustainability (GMS)

Twenty-four credits in concentration courses are required at the 300 level or above, with 15 credits in environmental and natural resource economics (EEC), including economics of natural resource management and policy (EEC 310), benefit-cost analysis (EEC 440), and a capstone course in environmental economics and policy (EEC 432), three credits in intermediate economic theory or intermediate microeconomics (ECN 328 or 323), and six credits in other concentration courses selected by students in consultation with their advisors. Up to nine concentration credits may be in economics (ECN) or business (ACC, BAI, FIN, INE, MGT, MKT, SCA). A minimum of 21 credits in basic and supporting sciences are required in mathematics (MTH 103, 111, 131, or BAI 111), introductory statistics (STA 307, 308, 409, or BAI 210), and environmental geology or understanding the earth (GEO 100G or 103). Applied calculus (MTH 131) is strongly recommended, especially for students who are considering going to graduate school. Supporting sciences can be selected from a broad range of subjects including aquaculture and fisheries technology, animal and veterinary science, biology, business (BAI 210 and 212 only), cell and molecular biology, chemistry, computer science, ecology, geology, genetics, mathematics, natural resources science, oceanography, physics, plant physiology, or statistics. An additional 27 credits in supporting electives allow the student either to develop a closely related focus area (e.g., green business) or to sample from a broad set of relevant courses.

Option 2: Environmental Economics and Management (EEM)

This option is for students who seek a balanced focus on environmental sciences and environmental economics. The option requires 31 credits of basic sciences, including at least eight credits in principles of biology (BIO 101/103, 102/104); four credits in general or introductory chemistry (CHM 101/102 or 103/105); four credits in introduction to soil science (NRS 212); four credits in introductory ecology (BIO 262); four credits in understanding the earth (GEO 103); three credits in applied calculus (MTH 131); and four credits in introductory statistics (STA 308). The 24-credit concentration includes a minimum of 9 concentration credits in environmental and resource economics (listed under EEC), including economics of natural resource management and policy (EEC 310), benefit-cost analysis (EEC 440), and a capstone course in environmental economics and policy (EEC 432), as well as three additional credits in intermediate economic theory (ECN 328) or intermediate microeconomics (ECN 323). Students are also required to take a minimum of 12 concentration credits selected from ecology, soils and watersheds, and geosciences. Students choose a minimum of 20 credits in supporting electives.

Undergraduate advisors

Associate Professor, Director of the SimLab

Environmental and Natural Resource Economics

401.874.4398guilfoos@uri.edu

Assistant Professor

Environmental and Natural Resource Economics

401.874.4061pengfei_liu@uri.edu

Associate Professor, Undergraduate Program Director

Environmental and Natural Resource Economics

401.874.7428simona@uri.edu

Department Chair and Professor

Environmental and Natural Resource Economics

401.874.2238huchida@uri.edu

Professor | Associate Director, Coastal Institute

Environmental and Natural Resource Economics

401.874.4586euchida@uri.edu